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Discussion Starter #1
So today I got my new M1A "Loaded" out to the range for the first time. SAI was kind enough to include an article about zeroing the rifle, at 100 yards. Since I was shooting from a rest at 100 yards I just read along and followed the procedure, even though I have experience in this area on other platforms. Getting to the point... when I have the rear sight cranked all the way down to as low as it will go, it's still shooting about two inches over what I'd expect at 100 yards, using factory Federal 7.62 x 51 168 gr OTM. According to the article's recommended procedure, I was supposed to first crank it all the way down, and then come up about 10 clicks to be "very close to your aiming point" (using) "service grade sights." I did that and was hitting 10" high on a standard 100 yard military target using a six-o'clock hold. So, I cranked it all the way back down until it bottomed out again, and they were then hitting in the top half of a 6.3" bullseye. I'm new to the M1A, but this didn't seem right to me. So, I moved over the the 200 yard range, left the sights were they were, and using a 12" bullseye, it was hitting exactly at point of aim (6:00 on the bull).

Can anyone help me understand what might be going on here? My rifle has NM sights. I don't think that would result in this issue vs "service grade sights." When zeroed at 100 yards, shouldn't I still have at least a couple of clicks of elevation to come down before bottoming out?
 

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Sometimes a hooded rear sight doesn't go as low as a standard sight.

Some rifles just shoot high, particularly Match grade. I have put the LRB taller front sight on several match rifles to give me a zero of about 10-12 clicks.
 

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Try replacing your front sight with the tall front sight that LRB sells. It’s not as narrow of a front sight blade as the NM ones but it is thinner than the standard GI sight. The extra height will give you some more room with your adjustment of the rear sight and bring it closer to what you’re expecting


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Interesting! Thanks. On the ride home from the range, I was thinking that somebody must make a taller front site, but also was wondering why I would need one on a brand new gun. So if I'm understanding both of you who have replied with similar answers, this is not an unusual situation, and it doesn't mean there is anything way out of spec on my rifle. Am I correct in this understanding, or am I just hearing what I want to hear?
 

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It’s not anything I would worry about too much. Especially if the gun is grouping nicely and running reliably. Some guns just need a little trial and error to get right. Try out a taller sight and you should be good to go!


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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks so much for the insight! It functioned perfectly. The groups were good for shooting irons with troubled 57-year-old eyes. Based on my results under these conditions, I'm sure they'd tighten up impressively if I scoped it.
 

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Front sight...Flash Hider...Barrel...Receiver...Sight Base...Elevation Pinion...Aperture

7 parts. Variations can cause the rifle to shoot a bit high (never saw one shoot low). It's a common issue with the Socom (SAI makes a taller front sight to compensate), but I've seen it several time with Match rifles as well. Get the LRB sight. It is between a Stanard and a Scout (really tall).

I have recently started using the Bob Jones lenses in my hooded sights. Using irons is enjoyable again. Well worth the price.
 

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I would wait until after a couple of hundred rounds have gone through your barrel before making any changes.
Then perhaps go to a higher front sight.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks KurtC for the tip on the Bob Jones lenses hoods. I'll look into those.

And thanks nf1e for the reminder not to move too fast and make changes after a single range trip. I understand the idea behind your suggestion that the gun will "settle in" a bit. Is it your experience that the change could be enough to account for several clicks at 100 yards?
 

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Thanks KurtC for the tip on the Bob Jones lenses hoods. I'll look into those.

And thanks nf1e for the reminder not to move too fast and make changes after a single range trip. I understand the idea behind your suggestion that the gun will "settle in" a bit. Is it your experience that the change could be enough to account for several clicks at 100 yards?
Yes. Could be as simple as a knicked crown.With all firearms I like to give them a chance before jumping on something that might not be necessary at all. Of coarse the addition of a longer front sight is something that only takes a small effort and nothing would be lost. Personally I like longer front sights and then file them down to perfection.
 

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Only because thread this is about zeroing, and that's what I did last Saturday, and you guys can appreciate this, I took my Fulton to the range the first time after putting a scope on it. I started at 25 yards to see if I could hit paper. Fired three shots and saw no holes, so I took a peek through the irons and saw I was aimed to the right. Three more shots brought a nice group to the left on the target edge. By the time the range was declared cold I was ready for 100 yards. You know the rest. Very satisfying to work in an expected progression and see nice results. Anyway, thanks Tic Tock for posting and letting me share your thread.
 
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