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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not a thorough three-hundred-round cleaning, just a "I-just-shot-a-magazine-full cleaning". It's the first rounds I've run through it, and want to make sure I treat her right.

1. Swab it with Kroil, let sit inverted 15 minutes.
2. Brush w/ nylon bristle brush
3. Dry patch
4. Swab w/ Shooter's Choice Copper Cleaner
5. Dry w/ Boresnake
6. Lightly oil w/ Kroil
 

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You'll get a lot of differing opinions about it, but mine is just that: You don't need to clean an M-14/M1A THAT frequently. Such cleanings will do more harm than good. A bore-snake wetted with CLP is okay, just to clear the barrel of debris once in awhile (never use a dry bore-snake), but even then you want to have a reason to do so and 1 magazine is not that reason. Bore snake it every hundred rounds or so, but not sooner than that.

You certainly don't want to be sticking a cleaning rod down the muzzle more often than you need to. The more you do this, the greater the chances of damaging the muzzle crown or rifling, so you want to clean it only when it needs it. Wait a few hundred rounds at the very least. In fact, don't use a cleaning rod at all, ever. Get yourself an Otis DMR cleaning kit. It's pull-though like the bore snake and gets the barrel much cleaner than a cleaning rod will, without the likelihood of damage.

Fight the desire to clean your M1A. You are in fact NOT taking care of it when you clean it too often. Cleaning it usually wears it out much faster than actually firing it. This goes doubly if your M1A is bedded or has a match-grade barrel in it. Do NOT over-clean them.
 

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Mine get's cleaned with a dewey rod and hoppes every time I shoot it. My stock is bedded and yes I still take it out every time. I've had it a long time and I bedded it right and it's never hurt it yet. Use a bore guide if it makes you feel better. I don't. I guide it with my fingers. I have a nice solid bench in the shop with a cradle to hold the rifle though. If you're doing it across your knee then a guide will probably come in handy. I just put one or two wet patches down the bore with hoppes benchrest then let it sit over night and then dry patch a couple and then another wet patch. Let the solvent have time to work and you won't have to be putting the rod down the bore so many times. A one piece quality coated or stainess cleaning rod will not hurt your bore if you use reasonable care. Jointed rods will tear it up in a hurry. I won't even comment on the bore snake. Clean it with that then come back the next day with a rod and patch wet with some sweets and you will see what I mean. Most of my customers use bore snakes throughout the year then when I get their rifle for a real cleaning after deer season they act really amazed how blue the patches come out. They thought because it looked clean that it really was. Rod and patch is the only way to go. Or maybe a Otis and patch if you are into those.
Or do you wash that bore snake in between passes down the bore? :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
when you grew up with a father that whooped (yes, I got whooped and I'm not the worse for wear) you if you ever shot a firearm and didn't clean it, it's hard not to do so as a grown up. The main reason is I was shooting Radway Green, and I don't know if it's corrosive or not, so I wanted to err on the side of caution.

As for the bore snake, I don't know if you're supposed to or not, but I wash it and let it air dry in between uses; yea or nay?
 

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Radway Green is not corrosive, but I always clean my M1A after shooting it. I use Hoppe's # 9 Nitro Solvent, copper brush with half a .30 caliber cleaning patch around it. Wipe it clean, then wipe out with WD40.
 

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Bong!!! That's the deeply imbedded memory of the range Gunny Sgt slapping me upside of the head for using WD40 on my Garand when I was stationed at Whidbey Is. He was an old, old salt (30+ years) and set in his ways. He told me that WD attracts moisture? Don't know if that's true, but every time I see a can my ears ring. I wet(Hoppes)/dry patch with a one piece rod after shooting every time and every 600-800 rounds use Sweets and a copper brush in addition to patching. Moistened patch with CLP through the bore before I store it. I haven't screwed it up yet..............
 

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Tommo said:
Radway Green is not corrosive, but I always clean my M1A after shooting it. I use Hoppe's # 9 Nitro Solvent, copper brush with half a .30 caliber cleaning patch around it. Wipe it clean, then wipe out with WD40.
How can you read any gun board and not get the message about WD40? I would no sooner let that crap touch a good rifle than I would use Wesson Oil in my engine. You use the product designed for the application. WD40 turns into a gummy mess and is totally useless for rust prevention. CLP will do the job (as well as several others), but if anyone ever used WD40 on a rifle of mine, they would never be allowed to touch it again. I remember visiting 2 people with rusty firearms, and (you guessed it) they used WD40. That's the hard way to learn.

-- cw
 

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WD stands for water displacement. put it on wet metal and it will replace the water on that metal. but when it dries it leave no protection at all. then you must lube with something like CLP which is on excellent at preventing rust.

never ever never use wd-40 as your final application or you will get rust. unless you live in the desert.
 
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I appreciate everyone's cleaning recipes out in print to see what others are doing!

I do this with all my guns:

1. Hoppe's #9 first and leave the rifle bore alone over night.

2. Clean out residue next day and wipe off same on moving parts (I use Hoppe's Number Nine in the action to clean everything. I think it's just because I grew up using it even on .22s).

3. Swab bore and moving parts with CLP (what the Army uses).

4. Remove excess CLP.
 

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Not a thorough three-hundred-round cleaning, just a "I-just-shot-a-magazine-full cleaning".
...
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After just a few rounds all that's really needed is to remove the loose powder residue from the chamber and barrel, and to make sure the chamber & barrel are dry. I just pull a few dry patches from the chamber out thru the muzzle.

If the rifle will be unfired for a long while, doing a more thorough cleaning with solvent, brushes, fresh grease, etc. wouldn't hurt.

Another consideration is that it's common for the first couple of shots from a thoroughly cleaned barrel to be somewhat 'off'. So don't start making sight changes based on them.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
 

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As stated in a previous thread - the are as many opinions about cleaning as Carter has little liver pills. THe absolute main objective is to clean without damage to the crown-bore or chamber.
I rarely use bronze brushes alone but when i do brush it is generally with nylon brushes.
I use a one piece Dewy coated and or stainless steel rods - what I use for a bore guide is a quality one piece (Rem STS or WW-AA) 12 ga shotgun hull with the brass base removed primer holes drilled out to fit the rod. I generally use a slightly smaller than bore size nylon bore brush for a jag to have patches wrapped around them. The trick here is use a brush/jag:patch combination that is sung but not "tight". If the patch is too tight it may cause the rod to bend and flex as it is being used.
Solvent - again - subjective.... I use a 2:1 mix of Shooters Choice and Kroil. Wet the bore let it sit - wet patch - let it sit - wet patch - let it sit, etc. Dry the bore with dry patches if I am going to shoot soon. If it will be a long time before it is to be fired again I may put a light oil in the bore being certain to dry it out before going back to the range.
If copper fouling is a serious issue - Sweets 7.62 is excellent --- HOWEVER, do not mix Sweets 7.62 and Shooters Choice and let that combination sit in the bore.
I use a chamber brush on the chamber and clean with solvent and dry it out.
For the out side, if needed, I have found QMaxx to be an excellent product.

I tend to modify my cleaning for each rifle depending on how much it has been shot. I try not to over do it as has been stated above - I have had several really good gun smiths tell me that have seen more barrels die from abuse than from neglect.

If you do not have quality cleaning gear you are better off not doing anything...IMO
 

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I use balistol for a bore cleaner in chrome lined bores, and Butch's bore shine in all the rest. I patch out the loose stuff, then wet patch it and let it sit for 20-30 mins. Then I will "if needed" wet brush the bore with a bronze GI brush. Clean out the residue with a good fitting jag and good patches "GI patches or Butch's patches", lastly "if storing" I run a wet patch of a good synthetic rust stopping oil in the bore and leave it. If I am going to be shooting it within 24 hours, I do not wet the bore with oil, that is only for long term storage. All this is done with a one piece rod made to the proper length for the M14, along with a tight fitting bore guide. I also use a Possum hollow action insert to catch run-out cleaner, oil, and dirt. I have a chamber cleaning set-up I use to brush and patch the chamber between major cleanings, and during major cleanings, also use it as needed if only the chamber is dirty.
 

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What Doc said about Sweets and Shooters choice has been witnessed by benchrest shooters back in the 90s. Shooters Choice and any ammonia based solvent should not be mixed and left in bore. Each are excellent cleaners on their own. The reaction when they are left to set together for more than a few minutes will pit the barrel.
 
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