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I was looking for a grease that I can use in both an M1A and on the slide of a 1911 handgun. I read on another forum that 130a is to thick for the handgun. It was suggested that i use lubriplate #105 as a universal grease. Is this correct? Both brownells and napa have the 105 which is listed as engine assembly grease. Thanks
 

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I don't think so, 130-A is NLGI grade 2.5, 105 is grade 0. A little goes along way. Another Lubriplate product is 130-AA, it's NLGI grade 1 halfway between 105 and 130-A. Calcium based greases resist water and washout better than others, they're great for guns, fishing reels and bicycles. I've been using Dupont white lithium grease with teflon on all my weapons, I believe it's NLGI 2. 105 is popular as an assembly lube for electric motor and engine builders. My guns rarely get rained on and when they do i clean 'em off right away and re-lube. They are so many good oils and greases out there, everyone has their favorite. INMO Lubriplate products are excellent, you wouldn't go wrong with any of them.
 

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If this is the stuff that comes in silver and black squeeze tubes and is kind of coffee & cream coloured, I would not use it. With heat, it loses viscosity and becomes very much like a transparent oil.

I use synthetic clear grease or +P Stainless Steel lube. Works great but I haven't bought any in years. Little tub lasts a long time. Use a dab of STP on the disconnector.

- Ivan.
 

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If this is the stuff that comes in silver and black squeeze tubes and is kind of coffee & cream coloured, I would not use it. With heat, it loses viscosity and becomes very much like a transparent oil.

I use synthetic clear grease or +P Stainless Steel lube. Works great but I haven't bought any in years. Little tub lasts a long time. Use a dab of STP on the disconnector.

- Ivan.
Dunno, I've been using Lubriplate 130A for my M1's and M1A's for a few decades and in all conditions and have had great luck with it. I think it is what was original issue.

Other's mileage may vary.
 

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Dunno, I've been using Lubriplate 130A for my M1's and M1A's for a few decades and in all conditions and have had great luck with it. I think it is what was original issue.

Other's mileage may vary.
Hi Mercman,

This fellow was asking about grease for a M1911 pistol. For the M1A / M1, I use synthetic wheel bearing grease by Castol. Bought a tub way back and use it for lots of stuff where a heavy grease would not hurt. Looks very much like the little clear pots with a yellow top that I believe was issue for these guns.

I have use Lubriplate as well for this application and it works well enough. If you get it in the tube, you might notice that the stuff at the tip is oil rather than grease?

- Ivan.
 

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When my daily carry was a 1911 I tried a few different greases, including 130A, gunslick and Rig. None of the greases really worked well for me. A light application of a good gun oil was the ticket for me. The greases slowed the slide down on cold days and collected more particulates than oils. But who knows, there's lotsa new greases on the market now. That was 30 years ago.

Yeah, I do get an oiler secretion at the start of a tube but mix it around with the more solid grease.
 

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I was looking for a grease that I can use in both an M1A and on the slide of a 1911 handgun. I read on another forum that 130a is to thick for the handgun. It was suggested that i use lubriplate #105 as a universal grease. Is this correct? Both brownells and napa have the 105 which is listed as engine assembly grease. Thanks

I think the key to the answer is what climate conditions are you likely to encounter? We know that calcium based is good for wet/dry conditions. What temperature ranges are you likely to encounter? The colder the climate, the thinner the lubricant should be. You wouldn't winterize you car in your climate (Indiana) w/50wt. motor oil would you? I live in the Deep South in wet/humid conditions, and maybe only a month a year does it get below freezing. Lubriplate 130-A is used for all my weapons. dozier
 

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I would use oil on most handguns unless it's a stainless slide on a stainless frame. For that, I'd use a grease. Most will work fine. I've had no complaints with TW-25b.

True tony, forgot to mention in my post that I use a drop of CLP on things like trigger/hammer/mag catch pins etc. Any high friction sliding parts get the grease. dozier
 

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Wolf's Head

..Golden 30Wt was Earl's choice, it'll never let ya down. I read that in Korea GI's were forced to clean and use no lubricant whatsoever on their Garands to prevent jamming, man now that's COLD! Amsoil is great stuff if you can find it.
 

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Ive used the TW25b for awhile on my 1911s, and all handguns for that matter. I havent had any problems up here in NY, carrying and shooting year round with the same application the whole time. No complaints
 

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For the M1a I use rifle grease in hot weather, 105 in moderate, (40's-60's) LSA or 10W-30 in 30's weather.

I do not recommend greases in a M1911. The stuff is hard to clean out, gets impacted in every crevasse and corner.

Oil, and this is 10W30 synthetic motor oil, works great. LSA works great. Oil dissolves powder residue and wipes off.
 

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The 1911 slides should not be greased. period. The viscosity of grease will loosen the slide to frame fit and you will end up with a loose pistol. CLP or automatic transmission fluid would be my recommendation. I have used both and prefer CLP. It's cleaner. Doesn't matter if blued or stainless. Trigger parts and pins can be greased if cut 80%CLP/20%lithium grease.

Spec on the M1A is 130A Lubriplate. One can lasts a lifetime. Spec doesn't mean anything here on the forum. A lot of guys use (and with great success) heavy wheel bearing greases. Depends on the climate you shoot in. Good luck. Hope this helps. My 2 cents.
 

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I use lubriplate on my Sig 226 without issue, actually most (Sig) armorers recommend using a grease instead of oil. Ill try to post a link in a minute to it, but if you go to www.sigforum.com and look in the Sig armorers section there should be a sticky for "florks lubrication guide" or something similar.

http://sigforum.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/430601935/m/908103701

Here is the link
 

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I have always used good quality grease on my 1911s and I've carried them in harms way for many years as a cop. I was first introduced to the 1911 in SE Asia where it was love at first sight.

A light application of grease on the sliding surfaces, such as the rails, barrel bushing, barrel link and on the disconnector notch is just the ticket for proper lubrication. CLP is used everywhere else.

Light weight oils tend to wash out and be disbursed by moisture when combined with heat. For one thing, since uniformed police carry their pistols out in the open, exposed to the weather in all kinds of climates.

7th
 

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Does anyone have experience with Dupont Krytox greases? I've seen it advertised as the "perfect" lube for racing bicycles and fishing reels equipped with ceramic bearing technology. Expensive stuff though, used in aerospace and high tech industry.
 

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I lube all my 1911's, all my semi auto rifles, all my revolvers and all my bolt action rifles with moly. My guns never leave home without it. Moly eliminates all wear, reduces friction and prevents galling, stays wet and were we put it and doesn't attract dirt.

Example; My 1911 will cycle faster and smoother too. Plus there is no wear yet on my new AO 1911 with 500rds thru it now. I watching to see if the moly will eliminate the wear on the front rails on my 3 new 1911's. I see so many used 1911's in the used gun case that have this front rail/slide looseness when it could of been prevented with just a lube.

Moly has already proven its worth in my semi auto sks and saiga's. The finish is still on the receiver rails with many rounds put thru them already.

Adding a little moly on the trigger sear will reduce the trigger pull by up to 50% right away and more as it works into the pores of the metal. The trigger is way smoother too.

Trust me you have to try this stuff. Its already inside my m14 waiting to be test fired. Bill

BTW; Moly does come in a paste form, an anti seeze form and a grease form for just about every application known to man.

Moly is in that tube of engine assembly and camshaft assembly lube. Its an extreme pressure lube and has worked in every application i have tested it in since the 70's.

www.tsmoly.com Once you try it you won't use anything else ever again....oil is for the bores to prevent rust.
 

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Does anyone have experience with Dupont Krytox greases? I've seen it advertised as the "perfect" lube for racing bicycles and fishing reels equipped with ceramic bearing technology. Expensive stuff though, used in aerospace and high tech industry.

I use Krytox grease at work, I use it in a Chemical Vapor Deposition Vacuum Oven for the fittings in the vacuum system. It is a very stabile grease at both high and low temperature and vacuum. I have never used it in a firearm, the cost is very high for a small tube.
If you try it please share as I would like to know.

Jim
 

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I don't think so, 130-A is NLGI grade 2.5, 105 is grade 0. A little goes along way. Another Lubriplate product is 130-AA, it's NLGI grade 1 halfway between 105 and 130-A. Calcium based greases resist water and washout better than others, they're great for guns, fishing reels and bicycles. I've been using Dupont white lithium grease with teflon on all my weapons, I believe it's NLGI 2. 105 is popular as an assembly lube for electric motor and engine builders. My guns rarely get rained on and when they do i clean 'em off right away and re-lube. They are so many good oils and greases out there, everyone has their favorite. INMO Lubriplate products are excellent, you wouldn't go wrong with any of them.
agreed 100%
 
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