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Myself I see the M14-M1a as the Premier U.S. Battle Rifle, Period

No doubt about it for reliability the robust design and engineering have created a long lasting versatile Weapon that has short or long range capability to follow shot after shot at desired target with accuracy and the knockdown power.

The Rifle just sitting there is SEXY, and you just want to hold the Rifle, and look through the sights and PLACE the bullet into the desired target. Hmmmm

And the MEN that have used the Rifle in combat that participate on the Forum to further the constructive use of Rifle for Marksmanship skills. Thank YOU to all that participate here, on the Forum.

I myself read here every day and continue to learn more about a Rifle that I have held for self assurance for over 30 years. That to practice my Marksmanship skills will make me a
better prepared Rifleman. Anything that I have written here is not ment to offend or DisHonor Men that have seen the Elephant, if I can use that term.

Why Do You Own The M14-M1A Rifle?
I was issued a M-14 during my visit to Viet Nam. Every time I pulled the trigger it went BANG! Didn't matter how dirty or wet it and I was! The M-14 was my BTC rifle. It's similarity to the M1 Garand I had at home drew me in. My A.R. Sales Company, three digit rifle came to me in the early 1980's. At that time you needed to show a score card from two High Power matches to qualify to purchase a M1 from the "DCM" and my rifle helped me win one match and and scored in the top 10 in the second match. Still have both the M1A and that subsequent Springfield M1 Garand. Both will be passed onto my kids. .. .. ..
 

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No one warned me here about the slippery slope I was about to go down. Three rifles later, I was HOOKED TOO!
Nobody warned me either. I have 2 M1As and my first Garand on the way.

Now I'm looking at my 3rd rifle.

A member on this forum has close to 50 of these rifles. As this member would say, "whatta hobby!"

It's quite an addiction for sure.
 

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It seems the craze is 16 inch barreled rifles these days. And I'm not opposed to them - they are handy...But a full 22 inch barrel delivers what I want from a 308 rifle - enough power to be effective after passing through windows, doors, walls, whatever barricades one might encounter. I really don't expect for the left to stand out in the open and shoot at me when Trump wins again lol. The recoil is mild enough for quick follow up shots too. I shoot a Springfield M1A Standard. I got it on sale, and to have something I could run like a mad man with cheap ammo - just to enjoy shooting the 308 cartridge. It's a pretty rifle too. I figure with open sights, no one really wants to mess with me at 200 yards and in. I can shoot it out further with open sights - but one to two hundred is where I enjoy shooting it the most, and most likely the practical ranges I would need it at - I think - I hope. Depending on one's income bracket, there can be a limit as to how expensive a rifle can be before it starts losing it's utilitarian use. My M1A gets shot like I stole it. And after 10,000 rounds, I'll probably sell it - buy another - and repeat the process. I also think the M1A / M14 says something about a man's character. It makes a statement , and I like what it says. I post this reply as the last thing I do before lights out. I usually shoot out in the desert for fun - But in 5 hours I will rise from bed - grab my M1A and my range bag - and be at an officail shooting range 15 minutes prior to opening. I'm shooting for groups tomorrow. Serious what can I do on paper at one and two hundred yards. I have high hopes actually. Iron sights - I'm hoping for 3 to 4 inch groups at 100, and 6 to 8 at 200. If I was scoped, I would hope for better. But this is my open sight battle rifle - I just want to be able to score quick hits out to 200 yards. 200 yards is the furthest this range reaches out to for now. I'm so excited to put my shots on paper I'm not sure I can sleep. Yeah - Not many firearms do that to me. How many solo camping trips has an M1A served as my protection in the deep woods. A 22 inch barreled open sighted M1A has always made me feel safe all alone deep in the woods of black bear country. The military history of the M14 appeals to many - me too I guess. But my own history of civilian use with it on outdoor adventures is what has really bonded me with the platform. Sorry for the long reply, but I just had to post when I saw this thread.
At 10,000 rounds you'll need a barrel and small parts but the receiver will last about 250,000 rounds and bolts can do 100,000 if given routine cleaning.
 

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20 years ago I bought my first M1A, A loaded model with a stainless match barrel, match trigger and sights. I loved it but I had to sell it about 10 years ago because I needed money. A couple years ago I saw the SOCOM 16 and I had to have one. It is a fantastic rifle! The two things that I have done to it is takeoff the scout scope mount rail and replace the handguard with a solid one and I put on a slip-on kick killer recoil pad mainly to increase the length of pull. I do not want to mount a scope on it, I feel that just makes it bulky and heavier. It is a battle rifle. Earlier this summer, I took it out and shot it off my bench at 50 yards, I got an inch and a quarter group using 165 grain SoftPoint outback ammunition. I have not had time to go shooting since.However, before the cold weather sets in, I plan to take it out again and shoot it at 100 and 200 yards. I figure that if I can hit milk jugs at those distances, that’s good enough. I love this rifle, so far it has functioned flawlessly.
 

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I was a 21yo sergeant stationed at Ft. Knox in 1987 before I ETS'd from the Army. Bought my first M14 clone (a SA M1A) from a guy at Knob Creek. Not during the machine gun shoot, just a nice Spring day with only a few people there shooting. One guy there had a buddy who had one for sale, he called him at work and I hung out until he went home and got it, then brought it out to the range. I gave him $700 for it. It certainly wasn't new but was in good shape. I remember my heart racing as he finally got there and opened the case!
 

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My Dad had a M1 Garand and a M1 carbine.

I was going to inherit these when the time came.

I had two M1 Carbines.

It only made sense to get the M1A to complete the M1 Series.

The Garand ended up being stolen from my Dad's place.

Didn't turn 18 until 1975, so I missed the original M14's.

Always liked the way it looked and later when I actually got one in hand, it just felt right.

Still trying to decide on filling the Garand spot.
 

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I bought a M1 Garland and a M1 Carbine through the CMP so I decided I needed a M14 and went and bought a M1A Standard from a LGS. Then I needed another one so I got a Scout Squad. I do have a nice M14 stock thar will go on my M1A when I decide to install it. Along with them I also have a 1903A3.

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My Dad had a M1 Garand and a M1 carbine.

I was going to inherit these when the time came.

I had two M1 Carbines.

It only made sense to get the M1A to complete the M1 Series.

The Garand ended up being stolen from my Dad's place.

Didn't turn 18 until 1975, so I missed the original M14's.

Always liked the way it looked and later when I actually got one in hand, it just felt right.

Still trying to decide on filling the Garand spot.
Sad to hear your father's garand was stolen. It definitely sounds like you need to fill that void in your collection though!
 

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Myself I see the M14-M1a as the Premier U.S. Battle Rifle, Period

No doubt about it for reliability the robust design and engineering have created a long lasting versatile Weapon that has short or long range capability to follow shot after shot at desired target with accuracy and the knockdown power.

The Rifle just sitting there is SEXY, and you just want to hold the Rifle, and look through the sights and PLACE the bullet into the desired target. Hmmmm

And the MEN that have used the Rifle in combat that participate on the Forum to further the constructive use of Rifle for Marksmanship skills. Thank YOU to all that participate here, on the Forum.

I myself read here every day and continue to learn more about a Rifle that I have held for self assurance for over 30 years. That to practice my Marksmanship skills will make me a
better prepared Rifleman. Anything that I have written here is not ment to offend or DisHonor Men that have seen the Elephant, if I can use that term.

Why Do You Own The M14-M1A Rifle?
When I was looking for a 7.62 rifle I couldn't find an auto loader with a 20+ inch barrel I liked more, plus the different configurations means you can build the right tool for the job.
 

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Having this conversation with another member earlier and I genuinely feel it's worth mentioning. I've handled and fired quite a lot of different weapons in my young life. My father, grandfathers and uncles have all been into collecting weapons. From WW1 all the way to present, each obviously has filled it's role and etched itself into history, but the m1 rifle, and for me the m14 just resounded differently. I to this day can't quite explain it, but when you look at it, you just know. Similar to that one car at the hot rod shows, one just had a way of standing out. Is it the lines of the build, is it the finish, was it the raw power hiding behind such an unassuming piece. Couldn't tell you, but every time I open my range bag, or see a picture of this classic, quirky and ovely temperamental piece of history I smile a little bigger each time. To me, its a gentleman's rifle. You willingly accepted this challenge, and its not for everyone. I look at the modern sporting AR style rifles as like a jeep wrangler, they are mostly built well and kinda cool, but if you've seen one, you feel like you've seen them all.... Save for a few crazy ones (.458 socoms!) The m14/m1a seems to be more of a personal reflection of its owner. Some are classic and simple with sleek lines living in a timeless wood stock, others are built to the nines with performance in mind, still a bit of a sleeper, but you can tell they mean business. As a car guy, at least to me, they perfectly personify the era they came to life. The late 50s were an engineering time in America we can never replicate. Power, simplicity and a timeless design. Is it the best, not at all, but is it the one for me....you can bet the farm on that one. They can keep their soy latte ARs with all those gizmos and gadgetry...ill take my 10lb battle hammer into the depths of hell and smile my way to the front of the line every time.

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My Dad and his older brother both carried M1 Garands during WWII, my twin brother (USAR 1968-1976) carried an M14. I was in the USAF (1968-1971 with transfer to ret. reserve) so, while I knew which end was the dangerous end, my issued arm was a S&W Combat Masterpiece (later designated the Model 15). I have always preferred rifles and love the M1 Garand and M1A ( I have a few of each, but my preferred M1A is a Supermatch, ser. no. 013xxx with all GI parts except the stock, barrel, and receiver that I picked up in Geneseo, IL in 1979.

I still prefer to shoot one of my M1s//M1As over my other rifles, and, as I approach senescence, will sell everything but my M1/M1As. YMMV.

Harry
 

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The real question is why do I own eight. I will never get to shoot them all in my life time.
 

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Discussion Starter #98 (Edited)
Think of it as a Great Gateway that you can improve anything you want if the Rifle you have needs improvement. Or fall into the Rabbit Hole and the whole world opens up to many possibilities. I have 2 Springfield Rifles presently and have upgraded some 10 or more that needed attention but were all good or better shooters. Then I could not stop with Springfield only and have 4 other makes, models that have their own personalities. And have what I need to build out another. With parts to build a few more.:cool: And still actively keep trading or buying more parts or Rifles. As said by a Marine on Site " What a Hobby".

As I have gotten older my sports carreer was changed, knee, then my profession in construction has got me to retirement. Now its all on my time. But its taken 32 years of M1A-14 to get to this point.

You can always acquire different brands, models to your own taste or requirements. Be patient and when a deal comes by be prepared to seize the moment.
 

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Having this conversation with another member earlier and I genuinely feel it's worth mentioning. I've handled and fired quite a lot of different weapons in my young life. My father, grandfathers and uncles have all been into collecting weapons. From WW1 all the way to present, each obviously has filled it's role and etched itself into history, but the m1 rifle, and for me the m14 just resounded differently. I to this day can't quite explain it, but when you look at it, you just know. Similar to that one car at the hot rod shows, one just had a way of standing out. Is it the lines of the build, is it the finish, was it the raw power hiding behind such an unassuming piece. Couldn't tell you, but every time I open my range bag, or see a picture of this classic, quirky and ovely temperamental piece of history I smile a little bigger each time. To me, its a gentleman's rifle. You willingly accepted this challenge, and its not for everyone. I look at the modern sporting AR style rifles as like a jeep wrangler, they are mostly built well and kinda cool, but if you've seen one, you feel like you've seen them all.... Save for a few crazy ones (.458 socoms!) The m14/m1a seems to be more of a personal reflection of its owner. Some are classic and simple with sleek lines living in a timeless wood stock, others are built to the nines with performance in mind, still a bit of a sleeper, but you can tell they mean business. As a car guy, at least to me, they perfectly personify the era they came to life. The late 50s were an engineering time in America we can never replicate. Power, simplicity and a timeless design. Is it the best, not at all, but is it the one for me....you can bet the farm on that one. They can keep their soy latte ARs with all those gizmos and gadgetry...ill take my 10lb battle hammer into the depths of hell and smile my way to the front of the line every time.

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
Well said. I feel exactly the same way.
 
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