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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Currently, my M1A has a "thin" sided USGI stock from what I gather by reading Scott Duffs book. Hence, it is not suitable for bedding according to said book. I am considering a Boyds replacement and am not sure which to use. Maybe the one that is already cut out for bedding? Or the heavy one and do the cutting myself? Any input would be appreciated. Also, in Duffs book he makes reference to a "slave" barrel for gas system modifications. Where does one find one? Thanks in advance.
 

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When you say USGI, I take it you mean a GI fiberglass stock? They are not prime candidates for bedding but they can be bedded. GI wood is okay to bed, be it heavy or standard contour unless you have a rear lug, then you want a heavy contour.

As far as which Boyd's to get, any one should be suitable for bedding. Routing out the stock can be done by hand using a dremel, but it won't look as nice. But once the bedding compound is in there, nobody will ever know what you used to route out the wood.

You can get a slave barrel from the classifieds. Once in a while, a barrel will pop up that's shot out and someone will sell it for $25 to $75.

I wouldn't get one unless you plan on uintizing a lot of cylinders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Tony. My stock is a walnut USGI, and seems pretty sound albeit a "thinner" one. I have no rear lug. Are you suggesting shimming with washers? What else can I do to metal parts without the slave barrel? Thanks again.
 

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You can definitely bed a GI walnut and be okay. Shimming usually provides and improvement over a loose and un-unitized gas sytem. As far as the slave barrel goes, I just meant that if you only want one gas cylinder unitized, I'd send it to Ted Brown or the guy that 82nd uses to unitize gas cylinders. I wouldn't drop the money on a slave barrel solely for the purpose of unitizing one gas cylinder unless you just really want to know how to do it yourself.

I prefer a unitized gas cylinder but my best shooter has a shimmed and un-unitized gas cylinder.

Tony.
 

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If this is your first time glass bedding.You might want to pick up a Junker stock. That will give you something to practice on. That will be less expensive then having to buy another good stock if things go wrong. .02
 

· "Death From Above"
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With regard to the boyds stock, I had both at one point. The Regular looking one without the inletting is called a type I the one with the inletting is a type II. I prefer the type I because the type II is extra extra wide however, as you already know it is inleted for a rear lug and the trigger area is inleted as well. I wound up selling the type II as new, after handling it I decided it was way to wide for my tastes. If you are familiar with the M14 Fajen stock, its about as wide as it. Seeing how you don't have a rear lug the type I would be a nice choice if you want that brand new look.
As far as getting a "slave" I assume you are referring to, as mentioned a barrel that you can use as a jig? If so I know LRB has several de-milled front ends. I am not sure what they are selling them for but it includes a gas cylinder. Not sure if they still have them in stock either.
I agree with what was said about getting a beater stock to practice bedding on. Again I know LRB has a bin of cracked stocks in front of the display case that you can more than likely get on the cheap.
 

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Well it seems that you are planning on bedding it yourself. If so, check out the glass bedding instructions in the reference section if you haven't already. Hopefully it will give you some pointers if you don't already know them.

Tony.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes Tony, I am planning on doing the bedding. I have read your treatise on bedding and am planning on following it religiously. I have experience in the construction trades (30+ years), and can do machining (have lathe and milling machine). The added plus is a practice stock (lol). I just made a .100 wide front sight for my SC 1903A3 that really improved my sight picture. Much friendlier for old eyes. What an improvement over the skinny one! Thanks so much. Chris
 

· MGySgt USMC (ret)
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A long, LONG time ago I lost track of how many NM "glass" jobs I did on all sorts of G.I. stocks with M14's in both standard and rear lug configuration.

Bottom line. If you don't use a rear lug, there are no problems using even the skinniest G.I. Walnut stocks.

IF YOU HAVE A REAR LUG on the receiver, then you have to have a fatter G.I. wood stock. The reason for this is the top rear of the stock has to be fat enough both for the lug and glass to go into the stock and enough stock "meat" around it on the back left side so the stock doesn't crack. Remember, the heel of the Garand or M14 receiver twists/torques and when you add the rear lug - you need enough stock "meat" that it won't crack through the side of the stock.
 
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