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It's not a bomber jacket, it's a flight jacket - still have mine ! In the early days of naval aviation, the pilots were issued brown boots, thus the distinction. The "black shoes" were the surface navy ( just imagine an intra-service rivalry within the same service !). For years, there was a faction that insisted that the "real Navy" was the surface navy ....... but the battleships are all gone, while the carriers are still out there.NAV1
 

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Olongapo City

Too funny....Yeah I remember doing the Magsaysay shuffle many times...LOL. At least I remember the first few hours..... Then we would head over to Marilyns Bar for a few rounds of "smiles". The good times with the LBFM's.
 

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LBFMs and Smiles . . sigh

memories of PI as a civilian contractor back in the 70s and 80s

oh to be in my 20s again
 

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The Lucky Bag was where lost gear, such as clothing were stored on the ship and from time to time they would open the Lucky Bag and sell the unclaimed gear.

The only time I heard the term ditty bag used was in boot camp and your ditty bag was where you stored your dirty clothing, which was tied to your bunk.

The Geedunk was the ships soda fountain and they sold pogey bait (candy, cookies, chips, soft drinks) to the ships crew.

On my ship the Geedunk was seldom open but when it was open they would announce it's opening over the 1MC, just before movie call at 2000 hours. The ship's Geedunk is now open and will remain open until 2000 hours.

The ships store was where they sold uniform items., cigarettes, pipes and pipe tobacco, razors, watches, foo foo juice (after shave) and other odds and ends.

The Geedunk and the ships store were operated by Supply Division personnel on the ship. When I was in the service (62-66) filter cigarettes were $1.10 per carton and unfiltered cigs were $1.00 per carton at sea. In port back here in conus you'd add a buck to the price of each carton due to taxes. In the Westpac, they would check us on the quarter deck before leaving the ship, to make sure that the ships crew weren't smuggling the cheap cigarettes off the ship to sell at a profit or trade for commercial affection on the beach in the bars.

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Whenever I encounter a Navy vet, I always thank him for the ride, unless he was a coxswain on a Poppa Boat. I hated those damn things with the leaky diesel engines. Never could keep my breakfast down when bobbing around in huge circles while waiting to make the run toward the beach.
I think that was done on purpose, so we grunts were glad as hell to get off when the ramps went down.

As for Geedunk, I never bothered to learn where the term came from. It was like calling a hatch a hatch, or an overhead an overhead. It was just called that.
 

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Back here in the states there were civilian owned and operated snack trucks that would come on the base and drive out on the piers selling pogey bait, sandwiches, soft drinks, chips, etc.

When the snack truck would arrive, the Boatswain's Mate of the watch would announce over the 1MC that the "Roach Coach" was now on the pier.

There was also a civilian laundry truck that would pick up our dress blues and take them in and clean them and bring them back to the ship. When this truck was on the pier they would announce over the 1MC that the "ship's service laundry truck was now on the pier for pick up and delivery."....

Since absolutely nothing was sacred to Sailors, at times when we would hear that announcement over the PA system... We would tell our buddies, that your wife, girl friend, mother, or whomever was now on the pier for pick and delivery. Like we used to say to each other back then, it don't mean a thing, and it didn't.

7th
 

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KenV,

"Pogey Bait" is anything that can be bartered or traded for "a good time". Candy, stockings, tooth paste, perfume and several other sundry items. It was originated in China in the 20s and 30s by the Marines who traded their candy ration for pogey, a bastardized pronounciation for a Chinese Prostitute.

I only know this because a womanizing Marine told me. I was a rosey cheeked all American boy and an upstanding member of our United States Navy. I never partook of these sinful and dispicable practices...much. Except maybe, in Subic Bay, Hong Kong, Saigon, Da Nang, Taipei, Sasebo, Yokosuka...did I mention Subic Bay? Gawd, I loved Olongapo....
ROTFLMAO !!! That was great.
 

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And just to add that's she's as beautiful as the day she was commissioned. Her hull was so badly decayed from sitting in the ship channel muck that she almost sank on the way to dry dock down in Galveston. My own opinion is that it was the spirits of her sailors that kept her afloat 'til she reached a safe berth.

She actually floats now in permanent anchorage at the birthplace of Texas Independence, as a ship of her lineage and service deserves.


And the Geedunk is still there!

Go Big T!

v/r,
Bear
The Commanding General of 1st Marine Division got a request from the folks who were restoring the "Lane Victory Ship" (out of Long Beach Harbor, CA) during one of the numerous social functions the CG had to attend. He was asked for a ".50 Caliber" and he said we most likely could help with that. SO........... it came to Division Ordnance to FIND a ".50 Caliber" for them and I was tasked with doing it. So when the Div Ord Officer tasked me, I told him I was NO expert on Naval Weapons, but I BET they meant a gun or cannon and not a Ma Deuce. A phone call to the civilian confirmed that. However, that did not get me out of the mission......

I was allowed unlimited long distance phone calls and called ALL OVER the country to find out information on the gun and how to lay hands on one. I called the folks restoring the "Texas" and they could not have been more helpful. They gave me info and some good leads. I REALLY hope to visit there one day.

Through the help of many folks and sheer Mule Headed Stubborness on my part, I FINALLY found a gun at Crane NAS for them. That took about four days on the phone and they almost had to surgically detach the phone from my ear. I was glad to be off the hook on that one, for a while anyway.....

THEN the same civilian came up about a month later at another social event the CG was attending and thanked him personally. THIS time he wanted an inert SEA MINE. They were going to sail the Lane Victory to Normandy for the 50th anniversary and wanted it as a display. So, once again the CG got a hold of the Div Ord Officer and I got tasked with it. I will never forget his opening statement. "Top, you really screwed up by finding that cannon. Now they want a Mine." I looked at the Major and said, "A SEA mine?" Actually, that only took about two and a half days and someone was smiling down on us as the Navy Yard at Longbeach had a mine they gave then and another type they loaned them for the trip.

When that was done, I told the Major to PLEASE inform the General that we "do not DO" torpedoes or U Boats. The CG actually got a laugh out of that one.
 

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I am the only person allowed to bring back a switchblade from Italy, riding an LPH called Inchon after a very interesting Med Cruise in 1974. I kept it in my ditty bag...

We had a surprise inspection and they said anyone giving up their contraband (of which switchblades were on the list) wouldn't get in trouble. So, about a hundred switchblades were in the box. I got mine and when the box came by I threw it in and the lieutenant picked it out and started laughing. It's about an inch long closed, two open.

He handed it back to me and said, he was making an exception to the rule... He turned a tense situation into a funny one...and I kept my switchblade... In my ditty bag.

And why did you squids keep stealing our boots?
 

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Nuke 'em till they glow.


If you can't stand behind our troops,
feel free to stand in front of them.

This is GREAT. I have to add it to my quotes to remember.
 

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Geedunk is pogey bait! Man we used to stuff our ruck sack with that stuff!

TFox, my little jarhead, came home with a "Ditty Bag". Just a bag full with stuff! And duffle bags, whoops, sea bags! Just made me smile!
Pogey Bait is what I remember from 1964 Boot Camp. We used to have what was called Shakedown inspections of our Foot Lockers looking for contraband. Sometimes the old 1st Sarge would poke around in a recruits locker and yell "Pogey Bait" and come out with a few Candy Bars or a copy of Playboy. Ah them were the days
 
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