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Mine is all hard red winter in 5 gallon steel cans with nitrogen. 20 years or more old...hope it hasn't turned to dust.
 

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i plan on growing some spring wheat in small plots next year. i have read logsdon's book on grains so i have some ideas. wish me luck because i will need it, lol...
 

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Hard red winter wheat in nitrogen filled cans for me also. But several 3 & 5gal buckets of rice. Powdered milk in 3gal buckets as well as some nitrogen packed.

HH
 

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I have quite a stash of red winter wheat that I bought from the LDS. It's in #10 cans with oxy absorbers. The cans are dated when they were packed and says they have a shelf life of +30 years if stored in a dry place @ 75 degrees or below . But I would think that if the cans retain their integrity the wheat will last indefinitely. They've discovered wheat in Egypt stored in the Pharaoh tombs that still germinates.

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I'm more of a rotater than a long-long-term storage guy, so have never done this, but a home-remedy-type substitute for professional nitrogen packing is fill your own can and then to add chunks of dry ice, allow it to 'melt' and off-gas, filling the the can with carbon dioxide, and then seal the can. Supposedly you're good for quite a while that way. Personally, even though CO2 is heavier than air I would put the dry ice the bottom and then fill the can with food, thereby fully ensuring all the air was pushed out, but that's just me.
 

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I'm more of a rotater than a long-long-term storage guy, so have never done this, but a home-remedy-type substitute for professional nitrogen packing is fill your own can and then to add chunks of dry ice, allow it to 'melt' and off-gas, filling the the can with carbon dioxide, and then seal the can. Supposedly you're good for quite a while that way. Personally, even though CO2 is heavier than air I would put the dry ice the bottom and then fill the can with food, thereby fully ensuring all the air was pushed out, but that's just me.
As usual I'm tuning in late. But as a guy that has a lot of wheat stored; eats a lot of wheat; and lives on a farm in wheat country; I might know a thing or two about wheat ;-)

Sweets, you're right on the money about this.

CO2 and Nitrogen will both do an equal job of storing the wheat. Some even use stuff called "diatomaceous earth" which I refuse to use.

Actually, storing wheat is as simple of a storage job as you can do. Perhaps the only thing simpler than storing wheat is storing salt.

I store none of my longterm wheat in Nitrogen. All of it in CO2. I store in 55gal drums and 5-6gal buckets.

The reason is simply because of what Sweets mentioned. CO2 is heavier than air. Which matters down the line when you pop the lid.

The CO2, being heavy, stays put and continues its protection after you close the lid. The Nitrogen, being neutral, swishes about and is easily replaced by air. The wheat in the CO2 is immersed and you can dip it out without disturbing the entire bin. Not so with nitrogen.

While the gas is contained, either gas is just as good. The nod goes to CO2 for handling later on.

To check CO2 levels, a match/candle/flame is lowered and will extinguish to see where the CO2 is.

Do it just as Sweets says: lump in some dry ice; poor in the goods; leave a loose lid for a day while the dry ice sublimates. Button it up. Cheap, easy, no special tools, lasts for a very long time. The CO2 on the bottom forces the air out the top ensuring that you have 100% saturation with no pockets of air.

This is not impossible with a nitrogen wand, either, but it's simpler, automatic, and more dependable with the CO2.

I'm eating wheat packed in 1978. Sprouts from some 1981 wheat.

It keeps plenty fine.

OH... and eating the stuff? Lots of ways. But perhaps the most unconventional is when I remembered that pasta is 100% seminola wheat. So treating boiled wheat berries (very easy prep) like pasta, weird as it sounds, works great. Sprinkle on some parmesean... some red peppers... etc. Starts my day.

My other favorite way is on pizza. Yes, I do. One slice of your favorite pizza (I like a supreme/works/heap of pizza) covered with a 1/2" layer of wheat berries? Fabulous. 2 slices is a full meal. Oh, and sprinkle on the cheese after you cover it in wheat. I use a lot ;-)

Not only does it stretch the pizza for cheap (you seen the cost of good pizza?) and takes on any taste of the pizza, but it supplements with both protein and nutritional goodness, AND provides a big bunch of natural fiber. Now, I can eat the greasiest, cheesiest pizza there is and it digests effortlessly in my aging system.... like a bowl of warm soup.

And there's plenty of leftover pizza. And as we all know, next-day pizza always tastes better ;-)

Anyway, I have two M1As and right at 3,000 lbs of wheat. That's a lifesaving combination in my books ;-)


Wrat
 
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