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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sure there is a thread somewhere about this topic but...
What lubes, grease, oil, solvent, etc.. do you use in your kit?

My kit is pretty basic

Basic cleaning: CLP and Hoppes solvent

Deep clean: Kroil and JB paste for bore (seldom used after initial break in) and CRC break cleaner for stubborn stuff.

Lube: CLP and Lubriplate

I think most guys are using about the same but curious if anyone has found some magic in a bottle.
 

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boresnake venom or Hoppe's # 9
3 in 1 oil with the 6 in wand for tight spaces or 10w motor oil
Walmart no.2 synthetic grease
Outer's foul out for lead or copper build up
 

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I have hoppes gun solvent and oil with the little needle applicator. I have a bore snake and the USGI cleaning kit although I have only used the chamber brush. It gets stuck in the chamber.
I use superlube synthetic grease.
Just got me a Sadlak set of cleaning drill bits and wrench for the gas cylinder.
 

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M10 cleaning rod with case, patch holder, bore brush, combination tool, chamber brush, and an oil/grease container with CLP and Lubriplate 130A or Plasti-lube 3.
 

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After over a decade of sending car, truck, and motorcycle used motor oil samples to Blackstone Laboratories for analysis, I came to a conclusion- rotating lubricants provides the highest level of protection. If one uses a high-quality product, you will get high-quality protection- but each individual product has relative strengths and weaknesses when compared to its direct competitors. So, in order to minimize the weaknesses and maximize the strengths, I chose to "even things out" by using high-quality products in regular rotation- and the test results proved my theory. "Best of all worlds" really can come to fruition by recognizing that variety truly is the spice of life. Diversification works.

I applied this theory to my firearms due to the comparable physical applications and analogous mechanical requirements for cleaning, lubrication, and protection. These are the products currently in my firearm cleaning kit for long guns and handguns:

CLP
RADCOLUBE
Tetra Gun Triple Action

Bore Cleaner
Hoppe's No.9
Wipe-Out Tactical Advantage
ThorroClean/ThorroFlush

Cleaner
Hoppe's No.9
Gun Scrubber
Amsoil Cleaner & Protectant

Lubricant
Amsoil Lubricant & Protectant

Grease
LUBRIPLATE No.130-A
Tetra Gun Grease

Protectant
CLP
Amsoil
Silicone Cloth



I have yet to experience any kind of failure that could be attributed to firearms maintenance...
and that's exactly how I'd like to keep it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
After over a decade of sending car, truck, and motorcycle used motor oil samples to Blackstone Laboratories for analysis, I came to a conclusion- rotating lubricants provides the highest level of protection. If one uses a high-quality product, you will get high-quality protection- but each individual product has relative strengths and weaknesses when compared to its direct competitors. So, in order to minimize the weaknesses and maximize the strengths, I chose to "even things out" by using high-quality products in regular rotation- and the test results proved my theory. "Best of all worlds" really can come to fruition by recognizing that variety truly is the spice of life. Diversification works.

I applied this theory to my firearms due to the comparable physical applications and analogous mechanical requirements for cleaning, lubrication, and protection. These are the products currently in my firearm cleaning kit for long guns and handguns:

CLP
RADCOLUBE
Tetra Gun Triple Action

Bore Cleaner
Hoppe's No.9
Wipe-Out Tactical Advantage
ThorroClean/ThorroFlush

Cleaner
Hoppe's No.9
Gun Scrubber
Amsoil Cleaner & Protectant

Lubricant
Amsoil Lubricant & Protectant

Grease
LUBRIPLATE No.130-A
Tetra Gun Grease

Protectant
CLP
Amsoil
Silicone Cloth



I have yet to experience any kind of failure that could be attributed to firearms maintenance...
and that's exactly how I'd like to keep it.
Have you found a silicon cloth that is better about not shedding/leaving lint behind?
 

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One thing I don't have in my cleaning kit is a jointed cleaning rod. Nor do I recommend cleaning rods with any kind of coated surface. Jointed rods can damage the bore and crown in an M14 barrel. Coated rods collect metal particles that can scratch the bore. My best recommendation is a one piece stainless steel cleaning rod like those made by Dewey. A 25 inch rod is the perfect length for the barrels on M1 and M14 type rifles.

I have to confess that I am a lazy guy when it comes to cleaning my rifles. Instead of having one cleaning rod I have three. One has a loop jag, one has a bore brush, and the last one has a Parker Hale style jag. I use GI type cotton cleaning patches available from Brownell's. I buy them in packages of 1000. It's surprising how fast you can go though 1000 patches. I use Hoppe's No.9 and occasionally Sweet's 7.62 bore cleaner. The loop jag is used just to wet the bore. I run the wet brush through about 10 times. I use the PH jag to push out the dirty solvent followed by a wet patch (about three strokes) and finish with a dry patch. Works for me and only takes four patches. If the wet patch doesn't come out looking clean I'll run another cycle. I sometimes use a Dewey bore guide, but I'm not convinced it is necessary since the flash suppressor makes a pretty good guide itself.
 

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I, too, have noticed a bore guide doesn't seem to provide any more protection than not using one at all. The first time I tried one I felt the rod hang up on the barrel crown- suffice to say I was both shocked and dismayed. I then very gently and carefully guided the rod through the bore guide and successfully avoided the crown. I then tested it with a bit less deliberation- and it again hit the crown. Son of a...

So, I removed the bore guide and carefully inserted the rod through the muzzle device without the bore guide- it went in fine without touching the crown. A few more tries with the same success convinced me to ditch the bore guide altogether- and I haven't hit the crown since. Your results may differ.

BTW- I use segmented brass cleaning rods and haven't experienced any issues with them.

A tool I do find extremely useful is the Possum Hollow Service Rifle Receiver Cleaning Port- it is all kinds of useful for cleaning a M14/M1A/M1 barrel.
 

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I have a pouch that lives in my LBE’s buttpack with .308, .223, and .45ACP boresnakes, a knife sharpener, a rag, and a small tube of automotive grease (Ford/Lincoln/Mercury for my truck) out of the big tub. Also an incomplete USGI cleaning kit in the stock, and I have a bigger pouch with patches, brushes, Hoppe’s no.9, picks, etc in my pack.
 

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What lubes, grease, oil, solvent, etc.. do you use in your kit?... I think most guys are using about the same but curious if anyone has found some magic in a bottle
I think you are using good products, similar to what I have. What I have in my small 'mobile kit' is a little different than what I have on my bench. On my bench I typically use Hoppes 9 (general cleaning of powder residue), followed by Bore Tech Eliminator (for copper fouling), followed by Kroil oil. On the left is the old Plastilube grease I use on M1s and M1As. (For general use the bottle of CLP or Remington Oil works fine). No magic in a bottle, but it works:
454700

For a range cleaning kit that is hardly ever used, I found a used OTIS 7.62 Sniper Rifle cleaning kit that I have sort-of modified for M14/M1A type rifles with the addition of the Muti-tool, etc.
454701

Its for range-based cleaning. CLP oil and a small container of Lupriplate grease. It has a pull-through cable and is only sufficient for a very quick/superficial swapping of the bore before heading home for a proper cleaning.

Note: The steel sectional rods are not used for cleaning, but could be used if needed at the range. (For example, I was at a vintage sniper match a couple of years ago, and the guy beside me shooting a bolt action rifle must have hand-loaded a bullet too long (and/or with improper neck tension). Indeed, as he pulled the bolt back to unload the rifle during a cease fire - the bullet stayed slightly jammed into the throat, where as the unfired brass case came back with the bolt - which spilled approx 40 grains of powder into his action...whopps. A cleaning rod on the firing line quickly inserted down the bore - pushed the barely stuck bullet out of the chamber/lands - and after cleaning out the spilled powder via opening the magazine floorplate and blowing hard into his rifle - he was able to shoot again in about 2 minutes. Caused a short delay and I am sure he was embarrassed, but that cleaning rod saved his day and he completed the match).
454703


My best recommendation is a one piece stainless steel cleaning rod like those made by Dewey. A 25 inch rod is the perfect length for the barrels on M1 and M14 type rifles.....I have to confess that I am a lazy guy when it comes to cleaning my rifles. Instead of having one cleaning rod I have three .
I agree that Dewey's coated rods are great, and my 25" rods in .30 caliber get the most use. I have 5 of them, three are in the .30 caliber with different attachments, and two smaller diameter, but longer rods for my rifles with 6.5mm bores and longish barrels. (The thin blue rod below is actually for .177 caliber air rifles, or I suppose .17 HMR):
454699


A tool I do find extremely useful is the Possum Hollow Service Rifle Receiver Cleaning Port- it is all kinds of useful for cleaning a M14/M1A/M1 barrel.
I agree, I have two of them - and use them every time I clean an M1 or M1A. Great item to have.
 
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