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I research the MPBR (maximum point blank range) for the type of ammo I am using. Usually it works out to a 267 yard zero or so and allows me to shoot game without having to do any math in my head up to 300 yards. I still print out a mil/moa chart and tape it to my stock in case I have to shoot further out, then I verify my rifle at the range or out in the desert on paper targets using my rangefinder. My comfort limit is around 400 yards to ethically kill game and not gut shoot it or wound it. Hope this helps though I am definitely not an expert.
 

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Hey scooby_d,

I initially zero each of my rifles at 100 yards. I then shoot at 200 yards, and then 300. I mark the elevation drums for each respectively. At 200, I shoot each of my handloads 125, 155, and 168 grain bullets. I take note of the corrections required for each. I also sometimes shoot some Port. surplus just to record the corrections because I have a pretty decent supply of it. I do this mainly because I shoot highpower, and need to know my elevation settings at each distance. On each of my rifles, 100 yard elevation is marked in white, 200 is blue, 300 is red, and 600 is green paint. I still count clicks, but if I have a braincramp I can look at the elevation knob and know which range it is set for. I tried indexing the lines by the numbers (2 = 200), but it does not necessarily work out with my handloads going from the 2 to the 3 mark. Thats why I paint them. Its simple and works for me.

Ordinarily, the number of elevation clicks is the same for each rifle given the same load. On one M1A and on both Garands I have to add 1 click right when I go from 200 to 300. Not sure why, just happens to be that way.
 

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As mentioned above - it depends on what type of shooting situations you expect.

For bullseye competition shooting you need to actually shoot at the various distances and WRITE DOWN the number of clicks for both elev and windage.
Having those numbers will get you very close, but some fine tuning is still needed for different range sites and weather conditions.

The the elev knob on your rifle has probably NOT been adjusted for actually using the knob to set the elev.
But you can count the clicks between the various marks on the knob to know the typical number of clicks needed to go from distance to distance.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
 

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I keep a log of clicks from bottom but I also adjust my elevation drum so POI matches the distance indicated on the drum. I've found that with my loads, (168gr at ~2600 FPS), the bullet drop matches my distance marks on the drum pretty well. Usually within a click or two.

Tony.
 

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200 Yards has worked well for me.GI2
 
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The only range I have access to now a days is 100 yards, so I am kinda stuck with it. My M1A's irons are set to 200 yards when I was still shooting with Tonyben off and on. I have been meaning lately to find another 200 yard range and confirm the irons before I mess with my Leatherwood ART 1000 again.
 

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Just for fun I'll recount an argument I get into with some folks at the range shooting an M1A. If you zero @ 100yds, do you add or take away a "Click-or Two" to hit the same spot at 200 yards? For example, a SMK 168 in front of 41gn IMR 4895, is the trajectory rising above, or falling below, line of sight between the 100 and 200 yard mark? If you leave your elevation set at your 100 yard zero, and you are an Alvin York class marksman, does your bullet impact at 200 yards high, low, or the same?
 

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50 yds.
 

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Just for fun I'll recount an argument I get into with some folks at the range shooting an M1A. If you zero @ 100yds, do you add or take away a "Click-or Two" to hit the same spot at 200 yards? For example, a SMK 168 in front of 41gn IMR 4895, is the trajectory rising above, or falling below, line of sight between the 100 and 200 yard mark? If you leave your elevation set at your 100 yard zero, and you are an Alvin York class marksman, does your bullet impact at 200 yards high, low, or the same?
bullets start drop as soon as it leaves the barrel. the amount of drop between 100 and 200 is nothing to even argue over. however a .308 smk @2650fps at 300' asl and 90* with 30% humidity will drop around 2moa at 200 yds...
 

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I zero my M-1A as I was taught in the US Army w/ M-14.

@ 25m (1000 inch).

POI is 4.6cm higher then POA w/ 7.62x51 NATO ball ammo.

Gives me a 250m battlesight zero.
You beat me to it.
 
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bullets start drop as soon as it leaves the barrel.
Not sure I agree with you there .... physically speaking, if that were true then rockets would never get off the ground.

As to exactly at what point in the projectile begins its downward trajectory ... that's dependent on many variables.

The 25/250 meter basic combat military zero was implemented 1968 and devised with 52 gr (if I remember correctly) 5.56, out of a full length M16, in mind. It's not exact, but it's close enough for government work with open sights.

It holds-up well, with iron sights, for x51 ... for most moderately skilled shooters.
Big difference between iron sight zeros and scoped zeros IMHO.

Through glass you want to get on paper first, and tighten things up. 25 meters still works well for that. But I like 100 meter zero through glass ... minimum.

I see everything in my mind in terms of trajectory because I'm an old school FDC guy who mixes a little ballistics and physics in as a hobby.

The pill doesn't begin to drop until ... well, a lot of factors come into play such as ...

The projectile's coefficient factor, velocity, MET conditions, earth's rotation, etc, etc, etc.

All of this, of course, is also influenced by the elevation at the muzzle end, of whatever the platform might be, when the projectile exits and is no longer accelerating. Things start happening real fast ... it's a miny big bang - of sorts, except it's not happening in a vacuum and it's a controlled release of energy literally channeled into a specific direction, down a specific path.

When we speak in terms of "flatter trajectories" we are using a misnomer because ... while the holy grail of trajectories is imagined in one's mind as a projectile that, in perfect conditions would hold MOA at 1000 meters ... in essence that pill would be following the exact curvature of the earth for that distance - so there would still be a slight arc in its trajectory.

Different platforms with different projectiles designed with higher ballistic coefficients shoot flat/flatter for longer distances than others ... that goes without saying.

The fact remains that there are plenty of projectiles in various calibers that do not begin to instantly drop the moment they are expelled from the muzzle.
 
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