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Discussion Starter #1
Im finally completing my tool kit for my m1a. Ive purchased majority of tools that are needed to break the rifle down completely whether its cleaning between range trips, extended storage, and even the annual head to toe cleaning. I have the otis deluxe military system but stripped the kit of the parts I won't have any use for. My choice of grease, oil, copper solvent, and degreaser is the tetra product line since Ive heard a lot of praise from clint mckee over at fulton armory. I know this topic has kind of been beaten to death with a stick plenty of times, but I thought Id reach out and see what the general consensus is nowadays. Heres my break down of my kit...

Tools:
- Combination Wrench
- Gas Cylinder Wrench
- Handguard Clip Pliers
- Castle Nut Pliers
- Stock Liner Screw Bit
- #15, "O", and "P" Drill Bits
- Assorted Screwdriver Bits
- Assorted Allen Wrenches

Otis System:
- 8" Flexible Cable w/ .30 Cal Eyelet
- 8" Flexible Cable (Chamber Maid)
- 30" Flexible Cable
- Nylon End Brush
- Short Receiver Brush
- .30 Cal Brush (Bore Brush)
- .45 Cal Brush (Chamber Brush)(Chamber Maid)
- 9mm Brush (CA Muzzle Brake)
- T-Handle Base and Bar (Chamber Maid)
- .30 Cal Eyelet
- Brass Scraper
- Curved Locking Lug Pick
- Straight Locking Lug Pick
- Pin Punch
- Female and Male Rod Section
- Thread Connector
- Locking Lug Scraper

Cleaning Supplies:
- Tetra Grease
- Tetra Lubricant
- Tetra Copper Solvent
- Tetra Action Blaster Degreaser
- Tetra .30-.45 Cal Cleaning Patches
- Double Ended Nylon Brush

Now this is where I have a few questions on what else should be added to my list. Because Im not entirely sure if it would make a difference. I was considering on purchasing a handful of bore mops. I know that the .45 cal bore mop is used to get solvent and dirty out of the chamber area prior to cleaning the bore with the bore brush and patches. Would it be a wise idea to pick up some .30 cal bore mops to run through the barrel? Obviously I would only run the bore mop through once. Thats why I was thinking of picking up a few for multiple passes. There was also a tool that I questioned myself about. Is the bolt roller greaser useful? Or am I just better off saving myself the money for additional ammo. Also any other recommendations would be greatly appreciated.
 

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My bolt roller greaser is a .40 s&w case, belled/flared, with the primer punched out and the flash hole drilled to 1/8". I just stick the case over the bolt roller, stuff the tip of the Tetra tube in the primer hole and squeeze til grease gets thru the roller.
Sounds a lot like my collection of M1a stuff, save a BAD T-1 Armorer tool I just lucked into.

Jeff. GlockRocket34
 

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I'm not familiar with the Tetra Grease product you've listed. I've used various high temperature automotive greases on my M14 with great success; hopefully the Tetra stuff you use is high temperature resistant and effective?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Taken from Fulton Armory.

""When I wrote on rec.guns, "Oil is bad for semi's. The robust cycling of the action throws the oil all over the place. Grease is better in almost every situation," I was asked, "Clint, I notice that you also sell Tetra Oil. What's the application for this? Barrels? Revolvers?"

Excellent question!

Tetra oil, or any oil, for that matter, should only be used as a primary lubricant in captivated assemblies, or in assemblies that do not have robust movement. For example, crankcases in engines & motors are sealed, as oil is designed fly around inside them, and thusly lubricate all the moving parts contained within them. Of course, if the crankcase were not sealed, the oil would go everywhere, and drip upon every manner of thing, except that which it was designed to lubricate. The same thing applies to gas guns and recoil operated firearms.

So, use Tetra Oil in any "captivated" assembly (springs, detents, plungers, gears, screws, levers, slides, etc., but only when enclosed in a housing), or in applications where inertial energy will not bleed out its effectiveness. For areas not enclosed, use Tetra Grease, only.

Tetra Oil Tetra Grease Tetra Spray

In addition, Tetra Oil is a fabulous protectant due to its hydrophobicity, impregnation of the treated metal, and corrossion resistance. It also is terrific for treating barrel bores. The active ingredient, PTFE, actually gets imbedded into the metal surface, and makes cleaning up a dream. Black Powder enthusiasts are believers, among many, many others.

Rifle bores, when properly prepared and treated with Tetra Oil, have actually been shown to significantly improve accuracy in all calibers from .22 to .50 cal. Believe it or not. For documentation, contact Tetra Products directly. These tests were performed by independent organizations.

Now, one might reasonably ask, "When should I use Tetra Spray?" Another excellent question!

Tetra Spray is a cleaner and very light oil that does NOT impregnate the metal pores, thus allowing the full benefit of Tetra Grease or Tetra Oil lubrication. Remember, one of the biggest advantages available with the Tetra family of lubricants is that the PTFE particles in all Tetra lubes will impregnate the metal it comes into contact with. So, it works even when it's "gone," but only if the metal is completely cleaned before use, allowing the Tetra Oil or Tetra Grease access to the pores of the metal. If the metal is occluded with old lube, dirt, debris, the particless cannot bond into the pores.

So, use the Tetra spray for cleaning (not degreasing, that is another subject entirely), the Tetra oil for captivated assemblies, or low inertial systems, and grease for everything else.

Oh, and treat your rifle bores with Tetra Oil 1-3 times a year.

Hope this helps.

Clint McKee
"

There is also information posted on tetras website. Link is provided below...

http://www.tetraproducts.com/tech_info.asp
 

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I found Tetra grease to be absolutely useless. It is not high-temp enough to stay put and after 20 rounds its running like a French infantryman. It's just too thin.

Lubriplate 130A or any other NLG2 greases are vastly superior. I never use oils on any parts of my battle rifles. Grease only.

Seems you went a bit nuts with the cleaning supplies.
 

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I've used both Lubriplate and Tetra on my rifles. Both work just fine. Don't over-think it. I bought a tin of Lubriplate from Brownell's so I have a lifetime supply, basically. I use Tetra on all my pistol slides and my stainless 1911.

Just make sure you knead the stuff real good; the same with TW-25B. The bottom line is; you're using grease, which is what you need. For as much money as we spend on our rifles, you can never have too much cleaning supplies. Some things are great to have and some things are not necessary. Sounds like you have what you need.The only thing I don't see in your list is a cleaning port...

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/958472/possum-hollow-service-rifle-cleaning-port-m1a-m1-garand

Tony.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well I possibly did go a bit nuts on the supplies, with majority of them being from the otis cleaning system that I found for a great deal on ebay. Haha, I just couldn't pass it up. Im possibly going to be returning the tetra products anyways. Especially with the quantity thats supplied with purchasing the lubriplate tub. I also forgot that I spoke to tonyben about using sweets 7.62 as a primary copper solvent and denatured alcohol as the degreaser. Ill give those a try instead. And I will admit that I have the tendency of being a bit anal about things like this. I was the same exact way when I use to play tournament paintball for 12+ years. Its probably even worse when it comes down to maintaining my car. >.<
 

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Only 'special' tools I have for my M1A are the USGI chamber brush, castle nut pliers and gas cylinder tool. You can get that stuff off ebay for about 40 bucks. Hoppes 9 and red bearing grease are what I use for cleaning and lubing, sometimes I put a few drops of oil here and there in the trigger group too. They are a bit more labor intensive than an AR to clean and maintain but not by much and it's far from being a complicated task that requires expensive lubricants and tons of time.
 

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Well I possibly did go a bit nuts on the supplies, with majority of them being from the otis cleaning system that I found for a great deal on ebay. Haha, I just couldn't pass it up. Im possibly going to be returning the tetra products anyways. Especially with the quantity thats supplied with purchasing the lubriplate tub. I also forgot that I spoke to tonyben about using sweets 7.62 as a primary copper solvent and denatured alcohol as the degreaser. Ill give those a try instead. And I will admit that I have the tendency of being a bit anal about things like this. I was the same exact way when I use to play tournament paintball for 12+ years. Its probably even worse when it comes down to maintaining my car. >.<
I've been accused of being OCD so don't feel bad, just gets expensive when restoring bikes or cars and end up making them twice as nice as they rolled off the showroom floor brand new. BTW Still using the same can of Lubriplate I bought over 20 years ago. Channel your A-retention in a constructive way start stockpiling ammo .
 
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Its probably even worse when it comes down to maintaining my car. >.<
Bet your car looks great though. I was really just messing with you, except for ditching the Tetra grease. It's garbage as after a 60 round match there was no evidence that the rifle had ever been greased. It all burned off in 60 rounds. Not so with Lubriplate and other proper NLG2 greases. These are the greases designated for use in military service, they are the correct consistency and stay put. Can't do your job if not present. Sure Tetra is OK for pistols, but not battle rifles.
 

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bolt roller greaser
broken case extractor
Flash suppressor alignment tool (optional)
bolt disassembly tool (optional)
 

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I went crazy on tools when new to firearms, after a couple years experience here are my must haves:

1) A very good (read $$$$) 20-150 inch # torque wrench.
2) Any grease that suits your operating environment. Acid brushes.
3) Art Luppinos Chamber wipe/cleaner.
4) A very good (read $$$$) dial caliper.
5) Gas tube wrench.
6) A vise. Not a plastic cleaning caddy.
7) One piece cleaning rod not long enough to slap your open bolt.
8) Hoppe's, cotton patches.
9) Acetone and sandpaper.
10) Ultrasonic (how I clean pistons).
11) Air compressor.

There is a ton of other stuff out there that I use, but the above stuff gets the most use.
 

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I went crazy on tools when new to firearms, after a couple years experience here are my must haves:

1) A very good (read $$$$) 20-150 inch # torque wrench.
2) Any grease that suits your operating environment. Acid brushes.
3) Art Luppinos Chamber wipe/cleaner.
4) A very good (read $$$$) dial caliper.
5) Gas tube wrench.
6) A vise. Not a plastic cleaning caddy.
7) One piece cleaning rod not long enough to slap your open bolt.
8) Hoppe's, cotton patches.
9) Acetone and sandpaper.
10) Ultrasonic (how I clean pistons).
11) Air compressor.

There is a ton of other stuff out there that I use, but the above stuff gets the most use.

I have a few rods I use, my favorite is the one made for me by one of our teachers, but I have some longer ones that work great with the addition of an accessory. I have a 1/4 split collar made for drill bit depth stop I think, that when put on the rod to limit the length, works great. I also have a couple brass devises that do the same thing made by Pro-shot that work great too. The depth stop collar is only about $1 or less at a hardware store, the Pro-shot thing is around $8.
For those without a custom rod, I thought this tip would be helpful. It makes the longer rods more versatile, which equates to saving money "to buy more ammo". Hope this helps.

Here is a link to the Pro-shot brass rod stop. [ame]http://www.amazon.com/Pro-Shot-Rod-Stop-Caliber-Rods/dp/B008PL7Q7G/ref=sr_1_143?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1403566387&sr=1-143[/ame]
 

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I only carried an M14 for about 3.5 years in the US Army.

We never used grease. LSA is what they told us to use and that's what we used.

Not knowing anything about grease, when I got my M1A I used oil on it for about 30 years. The most it ever got shot in a day, or two days, was when I went to my first Appleseed, back in the fall of 2006. Somewhere around 400 rounds in 2 days. Oiled up prior to the start of day one. Cleaned and oiled up prior to the start of day 2. No issues except some screwy SA surplus that shot patterns instead of groups till I realized I had more than one lot of ammo and went back to the truck to grab a couple bags of the previous (accurate) lot of SA.

When I got my first M1 Garand, my M1A started getting grease and has ever since - keep in mind the parts are still almost 30 years old and lubricated with oil (usually 3n1 oil or Hoppe's gun oil) prior to late in the fall of 2006.

My tools for maintenance:
1. A GI cleaning kit with patches

I'll bet I haven't used a chamber brush more a couple times in 35 years or so (I clean from the chamber to the muzzle so the crud leaves the barrel instead of getting pushed into the chamber/receiver. Never any extraction issues.

I've cleaned the gas system (thorough cleaning with brushes, solvent, and a battery operated drill) once since 1978. I wanted to make sure I had no issues when I went to the 2nd Rifleman's Boot Camp conducted in Feb. 2007 at Ramseur.

These days I grease the bolt roller like I do a set of wheel bearings. I put a dab of grease on the heel of my thumb and push the bolt/bolt roller into that dab of grease till the grease comes out between the bolt/roller on the back side.

Yeah, I know, I'm a bad boy. But its always worked for me.

I will say I haven't shot that M1A much the last few years. I bought an raggedy looking rack grade Greek return SA from the CMP that just shoots circles around that M1A so the M1A went into storage and the old M1 became my new "big" .30.
 

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I did not see the M1 buddy or the Possum Hollow chamber insert mentioned. I have both, I use the Possum Hollow insert almost always and it works great at holding the bolt back, protecting the bolt face, and keeping the solvent and crud out of the action. The M1 Buddy will not work with a scoped set-up, plus it does not create a seal in the chamber like the O-ring equipped Possum hollow insert. It helps to keep thing tidy, and is needed even less if your rod is the right length, but I like and use it anyway. There is no need in being messier than you have to be, especially if you have a bedded rifle. If you have bedding, I highly recommend the Possum Hollow insert, it is still nice to have on a standard rifle though.
 
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