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Well, my wife finally decided we needed an new ironing board (she needed, I stopped ironing clothes, mostly, when I got out of the US Army in 1979.)

Our current ironing board is the one I had (in the US Army) before we got married. That means I'd have bought it around 1976 or so.

I'd say we got my money's worth out of it. 44 years. If I take the time to really pay attention to it, when she's got it set up to iron clothes, I can sort of see a younger me standing there with a hand pump spray bottle of starch and water mix spraying it on my fatigues and ironing them dry and stiff as a board.

I'll bet not much gets ironed/starched or spit shined in the military these days. Even in 1st Platoon, Honor Guard Co. The Old Guard.
 

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I was in from '74-'77. Last duty station was in Worms am Rhein from '76-'77. Nice city. I was in a 7th Army photo lab detachment assigned to 5th Signal Command Headquarters. Since it was a headquarters for strategic communications throughout Europe and Africa, we had more officers then enlisted and more staff grade then field grade officers. Majors ran around doing errands like butterbars at regular posts. I used to keep 3 sets of extremely px starched fatigues, permanently in the lab in case of a quick "grip and grin" shoot in one of the O-6 offices or the C.G.'s office. Same with spit polished boots, rank, and belt buckle. All new without a scratch and ready for me to get into in 3-4 minutes. I too was wondering if the e.m.'s still did the spit and polish routine. I think their boots are now suede leather but I don't know about the jump boots. -Lloyd 🍻
 

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Not long before I got out the Army switched to the permanent press fatigues. Looked like dog puke eaten and puked out again.

We tried starching them like we did the older cotton fatigues and it didn't work well at all.

Many of us ran to the PX, clothing sales, surplus places, etc. and bought new/used cotton fatigues in our sizes and put on the necessary name tags, patches, etc. so we could maintain our starched/pressed appearance as long as possible. We'd wear our permanent press fatigues to the field or for training that didn't "require" starched/pressed fatigues. As new people showed up and old guys left that began to fall apart and we were finally told everyone had to wear permanent press. Just another kick in the head (we felt) in a long list of kicks as they (politicians and bean counters) destroyed unit morale and appearance.
 

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I was the sneaky one in Basic who picked up an extra set of BDUs so I could leave the same pressed sets hanging the entire time for locker inspections. It wasn't until the end of cycle that the Drills found out about that. After they found out I walked one of them over to my wall locker and opened the personal drawer. In it contained a second of everything in the top(display) drawer so I never needed to touch any of that as well.

That personal drawer was packed tight.
 

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Gee, I'm nostalgic for that song by Barry Sadler on the Ballads of the Green Berets . What was the name of that song?

I remember now, it was ...... Garet Trooper. He was the one with the starched fatigues and spit shined boots. Oh well, that's long ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was the sneaky one in Basic who picked up an extra set of BDUs so I could leave the same pressed sets hanging the entire time for locker inspections. It wasn't until the end of cycle that the Drills found out about that. After they found out I walked one of them over to my wall locker and opened the personal drawer. In it contained a second of everything in the top(display) drawer so I never needed to touch any of that as well.

That personal drawer was packed tight.
Personal drawers? We had one old metal wall locker with a couple/three shelves and an area to hang up the pants/shirts/coats and an old plywood foot locker. I saw more than one of the foot lockers picked up, turned upside down and all the contents shaken out on the floor (happened to me one time). In AIT I even saw a Drill Sgt. knock a wall locker over. It hit a window (2nd floor) broke it and then he shoved it on out the window to show he was really serious. It was in December at Ft. Polk and I bet those guys nearest the window spent some cold nights till the maintenance guys got around to replacing the window.

Our "personal" stuff went into the little bag/suitcase we arrived in and we did not see it again (in Basic) till we got it back from the locked room at the end of the barracks after we graduated and were getting ready to load up for our trips to our next training post (basic at Ft. Jackson). In AIT they again locked up the bags with our personal/clothes we arrived at Basic wearing. I think we got access to those after our 5th or 6th week of training. I do not remember where we had to keep them at. I never went into town anyway, so I never needed them to wear till I got to Ft. Myer, VA and the Old Guard. We did get some room there for our civilian clothes/stuff in the big wall locker, which also had a little 3 drawer chest in the bottom on one side.

The memories. Glad I did it once. Could not do it again. Used to say I didn't want to do it again. Now I know I physically can't do it again.
 

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Well, my wife finally decided we needed an new ironing board (she needed, I stopped ironing clothes, mostly, when I got out of the US Army in 1979.)

Our current ironing board is the one I had (in the US Army) before we got married. That means I'd have bought it around 1976 or so.

I'd say we got my money's worth out of it. 44 years. If I take the time to really pay attention to it, when she's got it set up to iron clothes, I can sort of see a younger me standing there with a hand pump spray bottle of starch and water mix spraying it on my fatigues and ironing them dry and stiff as a board.

I'll bet not much gets ironed/starched or spit shined in the military these days. Even in 1st Platoon, Honor Guard Co. The Old Guard.
put her in a set of gi shorts and shirt and you can really have a flash back
 

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Personal drawers? We had one old metal wall locker with a couple/three shelves and an area to hang up the pants/shirts/coats and an old plywood foot locker. I saw more than one of the foot lockers picked up, turned upside down and all the contents shaken out on the floor (happened to me one time). In AIT I even saw a Drill Sgt. knock a wall locker over. It hit a window (2nd floor) broke it and then he shoved it on out the window to show he was really serious. It was in December at Ft. Polk and I bet those guys nearest the window spent some cold nights till the maintenance guys got around to replacing the window.

Our "personal" stuff went into the little bag/suitcase we arrived in and we did not see it again (in Basic) till we got it back from the locked room at the end of the barracks after we graduated and were getting ready to load up for our trips to our next training post (basic at Ft. Jackson). In AIT they again locked up the bags with our personal/clothes we arrived at Basic wearing. I think we got access to those after our 5th or 6th week of training. I do not remember where we had to keep them at. I never went into town anyway, so I never needed them to wear till I got to Ft. Myer, VA and the Old Guard. We did get some room there for our civilian clothes/stuff in the big wall locker, which also had a little 3 drawer chest in the bottom on one side.

The memories. Glad I did it once. Could not do it again. Used to say I didn't want to do it again. Now I know I physically can't do it again.
Yup, must have been the same three drawer type chest you had. Top two drawers were display(top was hygiene and middle was clothing) with the bottom drawer being for whatever the overflow was. The top two were opened during wall locker inspection and the bottom was left alone.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I don't mind if we turn this into an inspection thread. I'll bet all of us have some funny stories from those days.

I have a couple right now, but I'll only tell one to start.

Ft. Myer, Va. 1st Plt. of Honor Guard Co. The guys that do the White House jobs, (or did in those days), the Tomb jobs, the Pentagon jobs, the funerals of any important person that died and got a funeral at Ft. Myer/Arlington Cemetary.

You know how inspections go. You're running around (we had rooms, 2 to 4 people per room depending on the size of the room) trying to get your stuff ready, trying to get the room ready, and working on it up to the last minute. The inspection team might be a couple rooms away but until they get to the room next to yours, you're getting ready. Once the get to the room next to yours you stop the cleaning, stand by your bunk and wait at parade rest, till the inspection team arrives.

Well, two rooms down from our room was a 3 person room. The guys are in/out, getting ready. The inspection team gets close, they rush back to their room and take their places. As they are standing there one of them smells something really bad and thinks one of the other guy cut a really nasty fart, but says nothing. Till the smell doesn't go away. Then he accuses one of the room mates of farting and the room mate denies it. Then another room mate smells it. A verbal argument starts about who is farting.

Then, the inspection team arrives at the door, the room mates snap to attention and the inspection team enters the room and starts to examine, everything. Floors, walls, bunks, lockers, overhead lights, you know the routine/thoroughness of those inspections. The smell is just getting stronger. The room mates are looking at each other, but can't say/do anything. Then, the Plt. Sgt. (carrying the clipboard and writing down issues the Plt. Leader finds) suddenly gets a funny look on his face and starts staring at one of the room mates, then the next, then the next. They know what is wrong, but can't say/do anything about it. The Plt. Leader seems oblivious to the smell and continues looking through the wall locker he's concentrating on. The Plt. Sgt. begins to walk around the room, looking for the source of the smell. He walks over to the small OD green room garbage can, looks down and his head snaps up in surprise. He turns to again stare at the room mates and they have no clue what just happened, but they know it's bad.

The Plt. Sgt. gets the Plt. Leaders attention and calls him over to the garbage can. You know, if you've "been there", these garbage cans are taken to the latrine and scrubbed out every morning and especially well scrubbed out and dried prior to a room inspection. The Plt. Leader suddenly becomes "aware" of the awful smell and as he looks into the garbage can he, too, suddenly turns around to stare at the three room mates who are, now, really feeling the stress as they know something is wrong and have no idea what it is - but are beginning to get an idea.

The Plt. Sgt. calls them over to look at the garbage can and (you guessed it), there is a pile of fresh turds in the bottom of that recently washed OD green garbage can.

Horseplay in the barracks. Again, we've all been there, done it, had it done to us.

One of the guys from a couple rooms down (who just happened to be a WV boy from up around Clarksburg) noticed all three room mate were out of the room at the same time and he quickly entered the room, dropped his pants and took a dump in the garbage can and got out without anyone noticing till it was too late.

A classic, in those days. These days that might result in the whole platoon going to some sort of counseling session(s).
 
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