M14 Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finishing up my EBR build in a Tan M14ALCS/CV. I'm looking at either the Vortex Viper PST 2.5-10x32 or the Viper PST 2.5-10x44. I'd appreciate hearing about the pros and cons of both. Also, anybody know why the x44 is so much less expensive? Thanks. I look forward to hearing your input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
It's probably because of the demand. typically if there is less demand for a certain product it will retail more, even though, the cost of manufacturing should be the same. Sucks but thats how it is...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's probably because of the demand. typically if there is less demand for a certain product it will retail more, even though, the cost of manufacturing should be the same. Sucks but thats how it is...
So why is the 2.5-10x32 so much more popular?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I just purchased a Vortex Viper 6-24X50 PST MRAD for my M25 build. The scope is awesome I love the features and Vortex has awesome customer service. I called and picked their minds and they answered all of my questions. The only problem I had was the high demand for the scope. It took two months to come in but it was well worth the wait. I bought the scope from Scott at Libery Optics I would give him a call.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,118 Posts
Whether to go with an FFP or SFP depends on what you're going to be doing with it. Frankly, for anything other than military Snipers in non-urban environs, I recommend the SFP to all my students (and anyone that asks!).

While it is easier to range with an FFP on any power setting, you can range at any power with an SFP......you just end up adding 1 more step to your mathematical equation.

The reticle on an FFP gets larger or smaller as the power range goes up and down. While this allows one to easily range at any power setting, it does cause one little issue.

If I dial the power down, it usually means that I'm either shooting at something close, something moving, or I'm not at my most stable (for instance, shooting offhand or high kneeling). In these circumstances, I would be better served with a larger, coarser reticle. Instead the FFP gives me the smaller, finer reticle.

If I dial the power up, it usually means that I'm either shooting at something further away, or something very small. In either case, I want a small, fine reticle. Well, the FFP gives me the large, coarse reticle. Backwards.

For military Snipers in places like Afghanistan, where you are rapidly ranging and engaging threats at a wide array of distances, the FFP shines. For anything else, it can be a handicap.

Nowadays, everyone thinks that they want an FFP, mainly because that's what the military is using. They are performing a task that is quite a bit different from the rest of us nowadays, so their tools aren't necessarily the ones that will work best for the rest of us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,532 Posts
I'm thinking about the bell size.

All things being equal...

Yes, we know they aren't equal, but let's pretend they were.

All things being equal a bigger bell should collect more light.

People who are highly likely to do their shooting at dusk or dawn can benefit from this. Deer hunters for instance. Otherwise, it's just a bigger bell without a meaningful benefit, at least in my opinion.


LOOKS wise, I think a smaller bell looks better on an M1a, but that's very subjective. You may feel exactly the opposite.

So, you can add those two items to the factors already mentioned if you think they might help you make a decision.


I'll tell you what might be more important though, just in case you haven't thought about it yet...

Are you more comfortable with MOA or MRAD reticles? Because if you have a preference it might be a factor here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,118 Posts
Both scopes are available in the same MOA and MRAD reticles, both of which are very well designed reticles.

If you don't already have mils engraved into your brain housing group, I would recommend going with the MOA reticle. I've been using mils since USMC Scout/Sniper School in 1991, so I've got 'em down pat. Most of my students are Americans, and by far most of them have an easier time using MOA's than they do mils. Neither are a unit of measurement, MOA's translate easily into the standard system of measurement we use here in the US of A. The adjustments are finer, at .25MOA. The MRAD scopes use .1mil adjustments (1cm @ 100m), which translates to .36MOA, or roughly 1/3MOA.

You can do everything you can do with a mil reticle with an MOA reticle. You can still accurately range targets and use the reticle for holdovers. The reticle designs are nearly identical, as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,957 Posts
The 32mm model has adjustable parallax as well. It's a totally different scope.

FFP in a 2-10 to me is kind of a drag but I will go with an FFP scope if it has a balance of other features that make it worthwhile. The 2-10x32 vortex to my eyes had a better image and it is a very nice all-around package.

For me where FFP really shines is in higher powered scopes for distance shooting where you want to shoot with holds. Lots of times with say a 20x there will be a lot of mirage past 600-800 so with a FFP scope you can dial down to say 14-15x and still use all the same holds for wind and elevation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you everybody. This is a great primer in scope buying for a newbie. I get why the x32 is popular but for range shooting the 44 might be fine for less money. You can't really beat a good illuminated scope scope for under $600.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top