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Got absolutely no idea who made them or where ...

I just gather them up and paint them but if you could Bill ... I would like to have some idea as to who and/or where the USGI synthetic stocks were produced. I believe that they are poured in a two part (because of the seam) mold of some kind.

Any info you can supply here would be appreciated ... TIA

Six
 

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Six: I guess you are referring to the ones on the market. These are the late design which came out around 67 or 68. The earlier ones were different stocks entirely.

I think General Tire made some of the handguards but the stocks I don't know for sure. Yes you are correct about the stocks being made in two parts. I have seen new stocks where the epoxy was not applied correctly and a parting line line existed that extended for 6 inches or more. That could only happen with a right side and left side process.
 

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There were two basic designs of the fiberglas stock. The early ones circa 1961-62 on. The early stock did not have the checkering near the front fore end and the small of the stock. They were very smooth and slippery due to oil or sweat, a poor design. Everybody in my basic and advance individual (infantry) training in Jan-May of 1964 had those stocks. When I arrived at the 82d in July all the rifles had them too.

The stocks were mostly reddish brown , I did see a few black, quite a few black handguards too. The stocks did not hold up very well on parachute jumps dispite the padded drop cases. The plastic stock had a high failure rate for breaking at the small of the stock. I also remember having to hold the M14 with my right hand down near the butt plate when divinging into the prone and hitting the ground with the butt. Anybody who performed that maneuver holding it near the small of the stock would end up breaking it .

As far as colors go I have a bunch of experimental stocks worked on at Springfield Armory during development. I still have probably five different colors, but I think I sold the white one to an artic collector for very big money years ago.

The GI stock we see on the market today is much heavier, has checkering in the proper places and is far superior. Naturally the older stocks are collectible today.
 
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