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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Everybody. I am relatively new to the M14 platform but I have been shooting and collecting old surplus for many years now. I picked up a USGI stock for my Bula Defense M14. When I went to install the fake selector switch I noticed the stock has a crack on the outside running from the stock reinforcement bolt to near the selector cutout. From my research it seems like this is a common area for cracks on the M14 stocks?

I did a little more looking and found there is another crack on the inside of the stock running to and from the same location but it is running on a different plane than the other one. So neither crack goes all the way through the stock? If I push on the area on the outside of the stock above the crack I can just ever so slightly get the outside crack to spread a tiny bit.

My first question is this stock salvageable? If so does anyone on here have any recommendations on how to repair these cracks?
If I were to not repair the cracks I am guessing they would get worse? Or is this in a location that would only affect the hunk of wood that's right in front of the selector cut out?

Thank you all for your help with this. I was excited to get my rifle in some USGI wood so hopefully some of you M14 experts can point me in the right direction. See pictures below of the cracks in question.
Brown Wood Table Floor Window
Wood Bumper Material property Gas Musical instrument accessory
 

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I would repair it, personally, but then I have been called stubborn and hard-headed before. :p I would also probably relegate the repaired and refinished stock to reserve duty, and replace it with an undamaged stock. But that's just me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for your response. Any thoughts on how to go about repairing it? I have seen online people using super glue or warm Acraglas to repair hairline cracks like these?
 

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With the glues that are available today almost anything can be repaired. I think , in this case, I would find a nice thin injectable and a couple of repair pins.
 

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Try to open the crack a bit and clean with mineral spirits. When dry, push in some of the brown colored Araglas. Use rubber furniture clamps to hold it closed.

For extra support, you can bed the liner and screws.
 

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That's not a reinforcing bolt on the sides of the stock. Those are the stock liner screws, they hold the liner in the stock and the liner holds the barreled receiver in it . -Lloyd 🍺
 
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Easiest method I have found is elmer's carpenter's wood glue. It is water soluble and easy cleanup. I fixed 1 similar to yours that was cracked completely in half. I used 1 brass pin and the Elmer's.
Follow the line with the tip while squeezing then push into the crack with your thumb and repeat until filled. You may have to put some on your finger and apply for the inside or it may work it's way all the way through.
Don't worry about mess. It will wash off with water.
You can stain over it with a toothpick. Looks like cherry stain might be the color. Again you can wipe it off it it doesn't match. Or a wipe may blend it in.
The flash makes them show, but in person it's hard to see. I used picobello laminate floor repair to cover the glue, but I have stained Elmer's. This was my first attempt with picobello. I could probably do it better, now
The weep hole is one I did with stain. It was completely cracked from front to sling loop. What looks like a crack is not it. It runs directly through the middle of the hole.
 

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I use threaded brass repair pins to fix stocks but GI pins are hard to find nowadays, I have used 4-40 and 6-32 brass all-thread to fix cracked stocks too, just grind a point on them and drill a pilot hole, I put epoxy on the pin and in the pilot hole best I can too.

eQ
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you all for your responses. I'm thinking the thin expoy and pin would be the best route.

Would I be able to run the pin in from the inside of the stock at an angle across the crack?

I have never done a stock repair like this so if someone could spell out the pinning process that would be much appreciated.

Thanks again
 

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No !! you go from the top edge of the stock down thru the crack ::: find the thickest place on the stock and drill the hole, keep the drill holes about 1/2 inch from the edge of the crack;; I would remove the fake selector and drill one hole their; than move down the line ;; than the top raised edge of the stock I would put number 2 and 3. And when done, you will cut off the screw sticking up with a cut off blade with a Dremel, than file it smooth.
On the inside crack about the best you can do is use some CA glue; it is like water, it will flow into the crack .
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
OK thank you. I understand the process better now. I will give it a shot and let you guys know how it goes. Thanks for all of your help.
 

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I use threaded brass repair pins to fix stocks but GI pins are hard to find nowadays, I have used 4-40 and 6-32 brass all-thread to fix cracked stocks too, just grind a point on them and drill a pilot hole, I put epoxy on the pin and in the pilot hole best I can too.

eQ
The link in my post above is for the GI-style brass pins.
 

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Yes; if you take a toothpick and shave it down you can work the wood glue or what ever you use into the pilot hole ;; just let it drip into the hole.
 

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If you have compressed air handy and the epoxy/glue is thin enough with a good working time, you can sometimes use that to get the glue into the deeper part of the crack if a thinned toothpick, or better yet, a thinned piece of bamboo skewer to work it into the deepest parts of the crack.
 

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I would tape the edges as closely as possible and use a flexible putty knife to push the glue into the crack like patching a drywall joint then wipe the excess with solvent and use a soft jaw clamp to squeeze it closed
 
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