M14 Forum banner

21 - 37 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,108 Posts
Sounds like a lot of voodoo needed to get this model of EBR to shoot well, that's not something I'd want to deal with when my life depended on it. Heck, the standard SOCOM M1A shoots better than that out of the box.
 
  • Like
Reactions: nf1e

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,677 Posts
M14s are not plug and play unfortunately. They are not hard to tame but require some know how. Not trying to say I know how.
Stock fit is key with any m14 rifle chassis/stock combo. One size does not fit all. Its key to good accuracy. It's the reason all NM rifles are bedded.
Oprods should be fit to their recievers, pistons should be fit to cylinders etc.
Yes you could slap parts together and have a functional rifle, but the little things make for better accuracy and longevity of the parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,492 Posts
M14 stocks are not designed to be dropped in. Because of the misgivings of the trigger assembly lockup, every stock needs to be fitted to the rifle and test fired. This is a Depot or Arsenal level procedure.

SA went so far as put the serial number in the stock channel, to make sure troops weren't swapping stocks and creating non-functional weapons.

Since the EBR chassis is metal, it messes with the harmonics of the rifle. A perfect fit creates precision, anything shy of that can create vibration. A friend had an oprod guide that fit snug on the barrel, so he left out the roll pin. It fired shotgun patterns. He put the pin in everything tightened up nicely.

You also have to make sure the barrel isn't contacting the chassis or cover, anywhere except the guide and the tension screw. I believe the crush washer has better results than shims.

The problem may also lie with the scope mount or rings. It's a complicated ad-hoc setup. The stripper clip guide insert need to be a solid fit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,075 Posts
This may be taken the wrong way , but why wasn't the Rifles tested before the last minute , hopefully there is a good reason . I know how it can get with last minute deployments , but 37 Rifles , interesting .

All I have to say is , stay safe .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,307 Posts
who built them/assembled them? Make sure the scope mounts are installed right and not loose.
Thanks for your service. Stat safe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
Stay safe.
I'll borrow one and get it running. I'm sure there are 36 other plumbers who would be happy to fix the rest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
This may be taken the wrong way , but why wasn't the Rifles tested before the last minute , hopefully there is a good reason . I know how it can get with last minute deployments , but 37 Rifles , interesting .

All I have to say is , stay safe .
COVID Shut all the ranges and everything down until we got permission from a one start general to get out to the range and shoot them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
841 Posts
I just visited the Sage website briefly, which proclaims that it is a "drop-in" conversion and reduces felt recoil. I was flabbergasted that the front of the scope base is connected to the hand guard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
I just visited the Sage website briefly, which proclaims that it is a "drop-in" conversion and reduces felt recoil. I was flabbergasted that the front of the scope base is connected to the hand guard.
That is actually the least of the crazyness. The rear of the scope mount is what holds the receiver into the chassis. The whole system is held together via tension. Weird concept to say the least.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
631 Posts
The EBR chassis used seem to be problematic. If the rear hooks are not grabbing on re-set then maybe the damn thing is too away from the receiver. And if too fat to clamp down, the trigger guard should be too tight to install.

That many rifles malfunctioning tells me the chassis are needing TLCs. Unless that many have trigger issues? Wonder if the hammer hooks are stock?

Also, on some rifle shooting 6 minutes at a hundred yrds - something is tweaking the barrel for sure. The EBR chassis literally should be free-floating forward of the guide block. The guide block may have something to do w/ the odd POI spread. 6 inches is way too much. Have not seen that w/ the loosest wood stock I have ever encountered.

At any rate, these rifles ought to not to be fielded.

Godspeed on the deployment. Everybody comes home.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MuppetMeat4Me

·
Registered
Joined
·
467 Posts
Just wondering, since I and the rest of the EBR Team have been retired for 8 plus years, EBR production was sent to Anniston Army Depot. If these guns were just received, I would be curious as to where they came from. I personally shot well over 3000 of the 6200 EBRs produced at Rock Island and only had one gun fail the accuracy criteria of 1.5 moa at 100 yards. If these rifles came from RIA as old stock from storage there should have been the target that was shot by myself or Doug in the scope box.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
I am willing to bet the receiver is not sitting far enough into the chassis. I have seen this recently with a Smith receiver that wouldn't sit in the receiver completely. It needed finessing... Look at the side of the chassis where the receiver is. if there is a gap there, it is not in far enough. What receiver is in the stock?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,081 Posts
Just wondering, since I and the rest of the EBR Team have been retired for 8 plus years, EBR production was sent to Anniston Army Depot. If these guns were just received, I would be curious as to where they came from. I personally shot well over 3000 of the 6200 EBRs produced at Rock Island and only had one gun fail the accuracy criteria of 1.5 moa at 100 yards. If these rifles came from RIA as old stock from storage there should have been the target that was shot by myself or Doug in the scope box.
Thanks for popping in! Just noticed you posted. Hope all is well with you.

Tony.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,433 Posts
I found that several of the early EBR chassis stocks I installed had problems with the hammer not catching the sear. The cure was to mill about .020" off the rear trigger housing seating surface. This allowed the hammer hooks to properly engage the sear. Later stocks don't seem to have this problem. Of course it's always important that the receiver has the proper contact against the top of the stock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,059 Posts
Just wondering, since I and the rest of the EBR Team have been retired for 8 plus years, EBR production was sent to Anniston Army Depot. If these guns were just received, I would be curious as to where they came from. I personally shot well over 3000 of the 6200 EBRs produced at Rock Island and only had one gun fail the accuracy criteria of 1.5 moa at 100 yards. If these rifles came from RIA as old stock from storage there should have been the target that was shot by myself or Doug in the scope box.
Great thread! Always good to have your expertise so pop in when you can.
 
21 - 37 of 37 Posts
Top