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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Question concerning unitizing:

Many years ago I built NM M14s. At the time, we were instructed to stake and epoxy the screws that attached the band to the gas cylinder, and to apply epoxy to the contacting surfaces of the band and gas cylinder. Screws and staking was ok with me however I had questions about the use of epoxy because those in use at that time failed at approx 200f.
My question IS,, do those of you who fix the band and gas cylinder together (unitizing) use any of the high temp. “super glues” or epoxies available today ??

Now a question for you “ordnance types”, is the Bavarian Inn (the BI) still in operation??
 

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The practice of using epoxy and staking the screws still holds. It's done to insure the screws don't shoot loose and it works. The few cylinders I've seen that had loose screws had many thousands of rounds fired and usually wern't staked. It's a simple procedure to epoxy, tighten the screws, and restake if required. This is something that can't be done with welded cylinders which are generally trash when the welds break.
 

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The barrel band typically hangs loosely off the barrel and rattles with every shot into a new location. When you unitize the gas system, you're screwing or welding the band to the gas cylinder.

Ty
 

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I have a "Loaded M1A" that is sub MOA (I was darn lucky with that purchase :D ) Would Unitizing the gas cylinder tighten the groups even more, or should I just not mess with something that works?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Bigchoad
I would be VERY reluctant to mess with a rifle that shoots that well. But if you must there is another benefit of unitizing you might consider. Unitizing can help the rifle “return to zero” after the barrel/action is removed and reinstalled in the stock. Most rifles have this problem but the M1/M14 are more susceptible to this problem than others. Group your rifle then remove it from the stock, reassemble then fire for group once more (same position, ammo, everything the same) see how much your zero changes. If the change is not enough to be a problem to you, LEAVE YOUR RIFLE AS IS. If you still feel your rifle needs improvement, carefully note how the rifle’s gas cylinder is attached, is it shimmed?, how is the gas cylinder Lock installed?, note the Lock’s front and back, and remember hold the gas cylinder when removing the gas cyl. Plug, never the barrel (fitted blocks of wood in a vice or one of the wrenches made for this). The flash suppressor must be removed in order to remove the gas cyl. You will need castle nut pliers to do this, note what notch the setscrew is in and always hold the barrel to remove the flash suppressor. Send your gas cylinder with spindle and band out to be unitized. Remember if the AMU method is used your spindle will be fixed (no more grenade launching). Kuhnhausen has a modification of the USMC method that leaves the spindle free. When you get the unitized gas cylinder back, reassemble everything exactly as it came off. If the gas cyl. is now a bit loose,, peen only the top splineway, lightly. Unitizing should help, however!! do not be too upset if all this makes no improvements at all. At minimum you should have a 10, 20 and a 35 manual. You REALLY SHOULD HAVE a copy of Kuhnhausen’s book.
 
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