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In 2011 I bought a Special Grade from CMP. It had all 1955 Springfield parts that appeared to be unused, including barrel. It measured .5 at the the muzzle. Since it had a CMP stock, I refinished it with Tung Oil. I paid $895 for it then and I have no idea what it would be worth today. I bought it to shoot it and it does that well.

Wood Table Flooring Floor Hardwood


If you want a shooter in excellent condition for $1100. Look at the Expert Grade here. https://thecmp.org/sales-and-service/m1-garand/ You must be a member of a club or a member of the Garand Collectors Association to purchase. Getting the membership + the price of the gun is a great deal.
 

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In 2011 I bought a Special Grade from CMP. It had all 1955 Springfield parts that appeared to be unused, including barrel. It measured .5 at the the muzzle. Since it had a CMP stock, I refinished it with Tung Oil. I paid $895 for it then and I have no idea what it would be worth today. I bought it to shoot it and it does that well.

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If you want a shooter in excellent condition for $1100. Look at the Expert Grade here. https://thecmp.org/sales-and-service/m1-garand/ You must be a member of a club or a member of the Garand Collectors Association to purchase. Getting the membership + the price of the gun is a great deal.
Last time CMP offered these they were available in the stores for I believe $1500. Bought an SA and HRA(w/LMR barrel) in 2012 for I think $950.....
 

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LRB M14 SA, Criterion Med Wt CL Barrel, all GI parts with basic upgrades.
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My old man has an unissued (1946 or 1947, can’t remember) Springfield with all the original sales paperwork from the depot in the early 1960’s, all original sealed accessories. and the dessicant tube still in the barrel. I’m sure he’d part with it for the right price. 🙄
 

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My old man has an unissued (1946 or 1947, can’t remember) Springfield with all the original sales paperwork from the depot in the early 1960’s, all original sealed accessories. and the dessicant tube still in the barrel. I’m sure he’d part with it for the right price. 🙄
If the rifle is from that time frame, it is likely a rebuilt rifle from a depot or SA. SA was doing rebuilds in your time frame. The last SA built rifles were from 1945. Your Dads rifle sounds like a DCM purchase from the 60's....
 

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I was recently bidding on a unissued Springfield M1 Garand with the foil still on the front and rear sights through the CMP. It was a low 6 million serial #, I’m thinking mid 1970s ? It was a little banged up from storage and was dry as a bone. I thought hey I’d like to have it at a reasonable price. Boy was I in for a surprise. I was floored on how much it actually went for and was outbid almost double. Am I missing something on the value of these? Dont really see much of an investment when you go over $3-4k on a 1970s M1 Garand. I thought even the Korean War era ones were pushing it on value and desire to have. I have always been told the WW2 time frame are the most sought after. Kudos to the guy who won the bid but it was way out of my financial comfort zone.
For those of you who like this sort of trivia:

The Last M1 to be assembled at Springfield Armory was assembled from parts on hand in the form of a presentation M1D with special tiger stripped stock. It was assembled from the receiver serial number 485,083 on May 15, 1967 and was issued with a paper that read, "THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT THE FOLLOWING WEAPON WAS THE LAST RIFLE OF ITS TYPE MANUFACTURED AT SPRINGFIELD ARMORY PRIOR TO ARMORY CLOSURE. THIS RIFLE WAS ASSEMBLED AS A 'SELECT GRADE' OFFICER'S PRESENTATION RIFLE FOR ___, PROJECT OFFICER, SPRINGFIELD ARMORY. THE WOOD ON THIS WEAPON WAS SELECTED FROM THE LAST REMAING STOCKS ON HAND AT THE TIME"
 

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I’m no expert, I thought the last one produced was in 1957. Im sure sure one in here has a lot more knowledge than me in this particular subject.
The receiver for that one was made in 1942. I have a Special Grade with a receiver made in 1955. The last receiver was made in 1957. Some receivers were never made into a complete gun. The one mentioned by mstagg was made from parts that were made earlier. They may have been used before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
This hobby is turning into a slight obsession with all the information and literature on these original American rifles. I find the 1937-1945 SA and Winchester more desirable due to WWII. I’m sure it’s getting harder and harder to assemble or find correct era platforms now. I’ve always wanted a Winchester correct grade.
 

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There are many many better investments than firearms that will actually give a reasonable return. Most guns don’t even keep up with inflation.
Winchester did a comparison between the increase in the value of gold and the increase in the value of their rifles over twenty years and the rifles won hands down. This was several years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Weapons are definitely valuable to collect especially if there is a profit margin. There’s always a threshold though along with desirability and demand. Not only do they hold a monetary value they have an essential value as well unlike paper money in the event of catastrophic events.
 
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