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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently purchased a "new" (spare) firing pin (aka "striker") for my U.S. Model of 1917 from a reputable company. Upon inspection, I notice that the tip of the spare firing pin is squared off (similar to a drive pin punch) rather than rounded. I confirmed that the diameter of the tip is .075" (i.e., proper for a M1917).

I noticed, too, that the length of the purchased spare is slightly longer than the rifle's existing firing pin. With the bolt removed from the rifle at half ****, the tip of the spare is precisely flush (no protrusion) with the bolt face. In the same half **** condition, the tip of the old, existing, firing pin is slightly below the level of the bolt face (i.e., not flush).

I have dry fired the rifle with the spare firing pin using a new A-Zoom snap cap and note the primer indent is well define, but it does not appear excessive compared to that made by the rifle's existing (used) firing pin.

The spare firing pin is marked "R" (Remington). I understand that some firing pins were marked "X" and required fitting by a field armorer. My spare firing pin, however, does not show any "X" marking.

My questions:

Is my newly acquired spare firing pin one of those that requires "fitting" to be serviceable (and safe) or is it normal for a new firing pin to have a flat tip? I thought all issued firing pins had rounded tips?

What is the risk, if any, of leaving the tip flat and flush with the bolt face (at half ****) rather than rounded and slightly below flush?

Is there any increased risk for piercing cartridge primers using a flat tip firing pin when firing the rifle?

I've attached a photo of the two firing pins. The "new" spare pin is on the right. Note the squared off tip and the comparatively long protrusion.
 

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could have been an upgrade to prevent piercing primers,or different maker

ww1 vs ww2
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Update... I measured the spare firing pin protrusion and found it measured 0.076" (average of several measurements). That's a little outside the original specification I found in my research (0.058" to 0.068"). I've modified the tip so that protrusion is now 0.068", and I've lightly chamfered the edge of the tip so that it now has a somewhat more rounded profile. I think I'm good to go.
 

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Might be a firing pin meant for a British P-14. Might be aftermarket.

The US Rifle of 1917 was a continuation of the British P-14. The original British contract did not have the parts interchangeability requirements of the US Ordnance board. In fact , the 3 makers had a hell of a time 'getting on the same page' as it were. There was a firing pin protrusion gage so the pins could be fitted to each bolt.
 

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