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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had a couple of two round bursts today. I guess you could call them slam fires. Pretty amazing, it was so fast and smooth. The ammo was purchased bulk, reloaded LC.

Actually it was a little unsettling, I get a two round burst and just stopped, going Whaaa? I looked around and nobody else on the line even noticed.

I am guessing that they are just sensitive primers. I looked at some of the other ammo and didn't see any primers sticking up.

I think I had a previous slam fire using surplus, but I had thought I just did something loose with the trigger and maybe I did, If you are holding firm with the left hand, I suppose the recoil could cause a bump fire. Today however, it was a fast and smooth burst. I think this is just something that can happen with an M1a. It has never happened just releasing the op rod, thank goodness. It would be so cool to have a selector for three round bursts.

I know the drill about checking out firing pin length and maybe I will get to that. I will fire some other ammo next time and see how it goes.
 

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My bet is it wasn't a "slam fire".
Were you shooting off the bench?
If you squeeze the trigger too easy off the bench it can double.
 

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That was not a slam fire in the true meaning of the term. What you had was called a double tap. It happens when you don't follow through with the trigger and hold the rifle tight to your shoulder. Basically the rifle bounced off your shoulder and it hit your trigger finger causing the rifle to fire again. My nephew got a tripple the first time he shot one of my rifles.
 

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82nd nailed it above . . I got a double in a Highpower match with my Garand last summer in the sitting position and I KNOW it was me riding the trigger . . .

Slam Fires happen when you let the op-rod fly home on the first round in a mag and it goes "Bang"
 

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82nd nailed it above . . I got a double in a Highpower match with my Garand last summer in the sitting position and I KNOW it was me riding the trigger . . .

Slam Fires happen when you let the op-rod fly home on the first round in a mag and it goes "Bang"
Slam fires happen anytime the inertia from the firing pin (without the hammer hitting it) lights off a primer , 1st round, 14th round or last round in mag, doesn't matter...

In regards to the double fire, this can and does happen from milking the trigger (as well as other reasons like mechanical problems with rifle), but essentially its just called a "double", like in "my rifle doubled on me". Its not exactly a "double tap" which is something that is essentially practiced and more combat handgun related than rifle related. Double tapping involves re-acquiring the sight picture very rapidly and purposefully for a follow-up shot..

If the "doubles" keep up, even with proper ammo, then have your rifle looked at by a qualified smith......
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, I was shooting off the bench with a bipod. I take it that the lesson is to be a little firmer on the trigger with follow through. I was trying to ease the trigger and not jerk it. Maybe I was too light.

This double was so incredibly fast and smooth that I didn't think I did it, but maybe I did. Thanks for the comments.
 

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I have found that folks raised in International .22 shooting will often milk a trigger as they got used to such a light trigger. I've also seen them release a trigger too soon as they got used to that with those rifles. This could cause a trigger not to reset.

FWIW, I've seen .22 shooters milk the trigger when they first began to use a North South Skirmish Association approved firearm and it usually involved the sear hitting the half **** notch and screwing up either the half **** notch, face of the sear, or both.

Follow through is extremely important across the shooting spectrum.
 

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How ironic, I got on this website to discuss the same thing and it happened today. I just mounted a 16X SuperSniper on a NM and went to a controlled range and was zeroing in for 100 yds using off the shelf Winchester 147 Gr. and had three doubles in 30 rounds shots. I had previously shot maybe 60 rounds free hand and did not have this problem. I also remember gently milking the trigger and not possibly having the stock fully shouldered tightly. In disgust, I put it away when several other shooters said just send it back to Springfield to fix it. Maybe after reading your discussion I will go back and use a different approach with shouldering and trigger pull. Thanks.
 

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I don't know how anyone can deal with that Zip, when I don't pull firmly into my shoulder...it kicks my bony arm like a mule, I have to in self defense...lol....never had a double.....except Jack Daniels.DI2.....

"Slam fires happen anytime the inertia from the firing pin (without the hammer hitting it) lights off a primer "......This should not and cannot happen with the M14 platform if the system is working correctly, with the receiver bridge and firing pin relationship correct. Inertia of the pin is arrested by the bridge and locked out of full rotation until full battery is achieved.......this is for the newbies...James already knows DI2
 

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You can make almost any semi auto rifle fire multiple rounds if you have pressure on the trigger (and maintain follow through after the trigger breaks) and are somehow pushing forward on the rifle when the shot is fired. Like on the bench if you are leaning into the rifle (anticipating recoil) instead of pulling it into your shoulder. Its called bump firing. All kinds of idiots do videos on Youtube about it. Almost all the simple techniques used keep rearward pressure on the trigger and forward pressure on the rifle.
 

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Slam fires happen anytime the inertia from the firing pin (without the hammer hitting it) lights off a primer , 1st round, 14th round or last round in mag, doesn't matter...
what he ^ said

James, I stand corrected . . I was trying to put it in it's simplest terms, sorry if it sounded mis-informed . . . ;-)
 

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I don't know how anyone can deal with that Zip, when I don't pull firmly into my shoulder...it kicks my bony arm like a mule, I have to in self defense...lol....never had a double.....except Jack Daniels.DI2.....

"Slam fires happen anytime the inertia from the firing pin (without the hammer hitting it) lights off a primer "......This should not and cannot happen with the M14 platform if the system is working correctly, with the receiver bridge and firing pin relationship correct. Inertia of the pin is arrested by the bridge and locked out of full rotation until full battery is achieved.......this is for the newbies...James already knows DI2
No should not happen, but the it can happen even if the weapon is functionally and mechanically sound but the primer cup is very soft or accidentally seated high....

But yes, they should NOT happen and are not a good thing....
 

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I don't know how anyone can deal with that Zip, when I don't pull firmly into my shoulder...it kicks my bony arm like a mule, I have to in self defense...lol....never had a double.....except Jack Daniels.DI2.....

"Slam fires happen anytime the inertia from the firing pin (without the hammer hitting it) lights off a primer "......This should not and cannot happen with the M14 platform if the system is working correctly, with the receiver bridge and firing pin relationship correct. Inertia of the pin is arrested by the bridge and locked out of full rotation until full battery is achieved.......this is for the newbies...James already knows DI2
DI2 Ha Ha! All things being equal, we are talking about a Springfield M1A here, thus the former statement is ... out the window... If the receiver bridge and firing pin relationship were correct, always, the term slamfire should not exist, yet it does. My statement was to convey when they could happen, not that they should happen....
 

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Had a similar problem with mine from the bench just after having the trigger reworked to NM specs. Had a partner with me and having experienced the same situation he advised better trigger follow through and the problem was solved.
 

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i have had a similar "double" experiance with my scout. the difference being it seems to happen while im letting the trigger out to slowly. i ALWAYS hold the trigger back when i break the shot, but if i let out too slowly to reset the sear it can double. if i let it out qickly to the full 1st stage position i dont ever double.

i am assuming this is inconsistant trigger control on my part? and not something mechanical?
 

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I had the same thing happen with a very light trigger. But it continued to happen (on occasion) when I held firm and followed through with the trigger pull. I ended up getting a new hammer, which fixed the problem. I know that not everyone would have done so, but it is a judgment call.
 

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I have had it happen a couple of times on my Garand but not on my M1a. It kinda rocks you.
 

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i have been doing some reading, and while i was cleaning my scout (was at the range on friday) i was checking some causes of the double fire issue.

there seems to be too much space between the sear and the disconnector (hope i am using the right terms). from a frired position while holding back the trigger, if i let out the trigger to reset the sear too SLOWLY the hammer misses the front hooks causing the hammer to fall and light off the next round.

if i release the trigger quickly the hammer catches on the front hooks, leaving only 1 round fired, but i am then left with the trigger in stage 1 fully let out. this is NOT the preferred trigger position as i am only desiring to reset the sear for a follow up shot.

please let me know if this can be adjusted. or if i need to send it back to SA
 

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The correct method is to keep pressure on the trigger all the way back until AFTER the bullet has had a chance to go through the target in slow fire. That's how they used to describe follow through with a Garand or M14.

On rapid fire, you didn't release the trigger tension until you were back in the original position after the recoil of the round you just got done firing. Now, that can be done pretty darn fast, but it allows the trigger mechanism to work properly and keeps you from pulling the trigger again while you are in recoil.

If you can't do that with your trigger as it stands and correcting your trigger control doesn't work, then the trigger does have to be adjusted and/or a little more trigger pull weight has to be put on if there has been a trigger job done to it.
 
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