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I just received my Sadlak Op Rod Spring guide. My question is this, am I supposed to put any grease on the spring or op rod spring guide?
 

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I lube all my springs in all my guns with moly. I let no spring run dry in any gun. All my guns are lubed with moly too inside and out on all the metal to metal contact moving parts. On the bolts, bolt carriers when it has a bolt carrier, on the op rods, op rod springs and a little on the gas piston too. Anywhere there is a metal on metal moving part it gets a tad of moly on it.

Moly;

Eliminates all wear
Reduces Friction
Prevents Galling
Stays were we put it.
Doesn't attract dirt.
Fights corrosion

Oil does nothing but maybe prevent rust if that. If your seeing any wear at all your present lube isn't working. I see so many used guns in the racks that have excessive wear and it can be prevented with by using the right lube.

I also see so many shooters lube with oil when a gun grease should be used too. They do offer a grease with moly in it too if you prefer that too. I like to use the moly paste or antiseeze because it has a higher percentage of moly in it. Don't forget to put sme moly on the trigger sear too. It will lessen the trigger pull by up to 50% right away and more as it works into the pores of the metal. The trigger will be smoother too. like an expensive trigger job was just done on it.

Moly my guns never leave home without it. Bigbill
 

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Does any one know if changing the guide rod to sadlak's, shimming to unitize the barrel and gas tube improve accuracy in a sai m1a loaded ? I also recently received a promag archangel precision stock (have not changed the original synthetic stock yet). Since I will be exchanging stocks thought I would change some parts to help make it a bit more accurate. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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Shim it. Changing the spring guide will not enhance accuracy...only smooths out the action. Shimming makes a big difference. I have shimmed 5 rifles and it made a difference in all of them. Then get a trigger mod to clean up and lighten the pull. About all you can do short of bedding it.

Check the stock fit as well. Grease the tip of the ferrule where it contacts the barrel. Make sure the stock is not rubbing the op-rod as it travels. Look for chatter marks on the op-rod and make sure all the parts are properly aligned. The entire endpoint of accurization is to have all the parts in the same place after recoil. Equates to tight groups. Also check that your aperture is free from movement. Peen the track in the base and lap it. If the aperture moves then recoil is going to move it and it will settle in another position. Thanks to Ol' Hook I know about all this stuff.
 

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I grease both the rod and the springs. If you are going to do a light coat on the spring where it rubs across the rod it only makes sense to do both sides for an even coating/contact. IMHO
 

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I'm glad to know this, saves me replacing the oil in my car since it's not reducing friction or preventing wear. GI2
Op rod wear just try some moly on it. Seeing any kind of wear tells me your present lube isn't working. Anyway having any wear at all is unacceptable when it can be prevented with just a lube. (moly)

You can get the moly additive for any application.

www.tsmoly.com

I have nothing to do with the sales or manufacture of moly. I had a buddy who worked for DOW Corning and he told me to try this new stuff back in the 70's. I been testing it in everything application and never a failure yet. I been using it and testing it ever since.

Hint; It also speeds up the cycle timing on any auto/semi -auto too.
 

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oil vs. grease

Grease is just oil (liquid) in a carrier media (solid). If you apply oil to a moving surface it will migrate fairly quickly to live somewhere else in peace and quiet. Grease is a way of keeping oil and any other additives combined with it in the friction zone for as long as possible. For a reciprocating assembly such as the op rod, grease is the way to go. Oil is always the actual lubricant, but it needs to be applied in a manner that is useful. I use Superlube myself, because it get it free and it is super.

John
 

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A few years back a guy on another forum was complaining about the wear on his op rod. He said the finish was gone from it. I spoke up about moly and i sent him a sample to try on it. He reblued his op rod and went shooting. I forget how many rounds he fired but he said the new finish was still present and no wear to be seen on it.

I have a chinese norinco sks from the very first imports its that old. It is in unissued condition when i first got it. I lubed it with moly and the finish on the receiver rails is still new looking with no wear on them at all still to this day.

The russian izhmash saiga's feel kind of rough(actions) when we run the bolt carrier by hand. The trigger isn't that great too. Once the saiga is lubed with moly it feels like a more expensive gun. The action is much smoother and the sear on the trigger feels like an expensive trigger job was done on it too. Plus the saiga cycles faster and smoother too.

I lubed my brand new russian saiga with moly and we(the 4 of us) hammered it non stop just to see how good the ak/akm design really is. When we got home i left my can of moly somehwere(MIA). I wiped out the receiver inside and washed the bore and left it. The next trip to the range we shot the snots out of it again. As we wrapped up shooting i remembered that i forgot to relube the inside of the receiver with moly again. I know once its in the pores of the metal its known to still have the non metal to metal contact present.
Moly gets into the pores of the metal so there is no metal to metal contact the moly actually wears against itself. With me being a worry wart anyhoo i figured the worst when i got home and took off the receiver cover. These was no galling or wear found on any part. Plus the finish was still on the receiver rails just like it was brand new looking again. The moly that was in the pores of the metal saved my butt.

My point is you have to try this moly just once and you'll be hooked on it too. Bill
 

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What the Heck I have a Beater M1 Garand I will give "Moly" a try
Big Bill
the Question which "Moly" product are you recomending
 
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What the Heck I have a Beater M1 Garand I will give "Moly" a try
Big Bill
the Question which "Moly" product are you recomending
www.tsmoly.com I use the ts-70 moly paste or the moly anti seeze because it has a higher percentage of moly in it (%). Its also a learning process on how much moly to apply to your gun too.

Example; On my newly aquired m14 i put moly on the bolt / roller, recoil spring and guide, a little on the gas piston rod, on the receiver grooves and roller plus the op rod. Then the gun may feel tight with the moly first applied in some guns with tighter tollerances. So i run the bolt about 25 to 50 times by hand. If its still tight you have too much moly in it. It should loosen up as the moly works into the pores of the metal. The gun will cycle faster and smoother with the moly in it too.

Put some moly on any trigger sear too. It will lessen the trigger pull by up to 50% right away. In my test on the sear my trigger had 4lb of trigger pull at first and after applying the moly on the sear i had it down to 2lbs right away. That was in 1976 with my new ruger s/s 357mag revolver and today its even smoother too with less pull its probably arounf 1.75 lbs or less right now.

There is a big difference in my ruger, S&W revolvers and my 1911's in performance when there lubed with moly.

I been always wondering why i see so many used 1911's for sale in the gun shops with so much wear at the front section of the frame rails. This wear seems to be the norm and accepted by most of us. I have three new 1911's in the moly test right now looking to see if they get this front wear looseness on the frame rails. My new AO WW2 1911a1 is still tight like it was NIB and it has 500rds thru it right now. One more thought that i have is the recoil spring in the 1911 can bind while the slide is cycling putting a little extreme horizontal force on the frame rails at the front section. It really shows up when we put the stronger 18# recoil spring in it too. Without the FLGR we can hear the spring coiling noise as we pull bacl the slide by hand slowly. The FLGR eliminates this coil binding and noise. At the sametime i hope using moly eliminates the excessive wear on t6he front of the frame /slide rails. So far with 500rds thru my new AO there is no wear or looseness seen yet.

You have to try this stuff, this is the lube we all been looking for. My fight is seeing used guns wornout way before there time when jut a lube can prevent it. I plan on leaving my guns to the next generation of my family. They should last to be handed down to many of the future generations of my family too. Bill
 

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Big Bill
Thank you. AS I said I have an old Beater M1 that I will soon Rebuild I will try it . The worst that will happen is I may not like it and Then I may and will report back
 
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Moly is FAR too expensive for a mid-20th Century battle rifle. Opinions are like you know what.

Lubriplate No. 2 works fine on my M14, as well as, my other firearms. Other lubricants work well too... such as Lithium and motor oil.

In this era of fiscal conservancy, I won't be spending my money on an expensive moly grease when Lubriplate itself is a moly grease and is FAR CHEAPER. GI7
 
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