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Who knows a no S*** way to refinish a tiger stripe stock without degrading the pattern? I got a pretty decent tiger striped stock that just needs a little work to really look sharp. To strip it I thought I would use “Klean Strip, Klean Kutter”, I tested it near the butt of the stock and it looks like it will take the striping off. Anyone know (as opposed to “think”) a safer way to remove the old finish?
 

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Finish

If you want the springfield arsenal red finish...the one that will undoubtedly make your stock a work of art...you should use the three step stain process that Candyman uses and perfected. I do, and it has never failed me.

Strip with paint stripper....hose it down with high pressure water hose....dry....strip again and scrape stubborn dark spots with putty knife....spray off again with hose...dry a day or two inside.....sand where needed.....stain with Rit Brown water based dye from Wal-Mart....Let sit awhile and wipe evenly and get residue off....I let dry another day.....with plastic glove on, rub boiled linseed oil on it briskly and causing heat in fingertips from friction.....let sit 10-20 minutes and wipe off excess with paper towels.....apply Fiebings Medium Brown for reddish tint, and Dark brown for walnut look, your choice,....I prefer medium brown and the beautiful red tint when finished on Birch...alcohol based dye, with the supplied dauber......wipe off excess.....let dry 24 hours....longer it sits, darker it gets...if not dark enough to suit you, stain again with fiieings acohol based dye.....after it is dry...the next day,,,,if you want to lighten it up, hit with steel wool very lightly....if not, just apply two coats of linseed oil in the next two days....letting sit 10-20 minutes each after rubbing it in...wipe with paper towels......you are done except waxing with a coat of Tom's Mix in a couple days.....Yours will be real nice... I Know....very fine example...good luck....don't be scared.....make a mess, then clean it up......
 

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Went through a hardcore milsurp phase and the stocks were my favorite part. Hung out on Paralaxbills and got a lot of advice from a cabinet maker (Cabinetman)who had the same love of stocks. Best way is to do the minimum. Generally start with the least harsh solvent and work your way up until you have the desired cleaning. If the old finish is oil of sorts, some elbow grease and a rag with laquer thinner is my favorite. Steam out any dings with a wet washcloth and iron, and just use a natural finish to let the beauty of the wood shine. I prefer Behrs #600 tung oil finish but not sure if they make it anymore. Bought a half dozen cans at some point and still working though it. Here is a stock I got from Freds (bought as a tigerstripe but almost black in gunk when received). Above method is what I used:

 

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color

Went through a hardcore milsurp phase and the stocks were my favorite part. Hung out on Paralaxbills and got a lot of advice from a cabinet maker (Cabinetman)who had the same love of stocks. Best way is to do the minimum. Generally start with the least harsh solvent and work your way up until you have the desired cleaning. If the old finish is oil of sorts, some elbow grease and a rag with laquer thinner is my favorite. Steam out any dings with a wet washcloth and iron, and just use a natural finish to let the beauty of the wood shine. I prefer Behrs #600 tung oil finish but not sure if they make it anymore. Bought a half dozen cans at some point and still working though it. Here is a stock I got from Freds (bought as a tigerstripe but almost black in gunk when received). Above method is what I used:

I agree completely with staying as simple and natural as possible and letting the wood dictate your direction of refinishing, but most Birch I have worked with will not accept and display color without a little coaxing...with boiled linseed oil or Tung oil only, they will remain more toward the blonde end of the spectrum, your stock had stain imbedded and was not completely stripped of color, or the tung oil would not have colored it as such....unless it was tung oil finish with additives and not pure tung oil........beautiful stick BTW.
 

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Greetings,

I did a big red stock about two years ago. Though it had a pretty nice grain pattern, the tiger affect was not anywhere near yours.

Anyway, I wanted to be very cautious when doing the clean up prior to finish. I used only acetone with a medium grade scotch brite pad. Just worked it over and over till I got most of the dirt and grit out of the wood. I then wiped the stock down with denatured alcohol to remove the salt deposits that were left over, then did a very light sanding just to even up the wood; probably started with 220grit, then 320 and final with 420.

Here are some pix:

http://www.analogbros.com/private/Fire Arms/M14/Big-Red/


Good luck!

Regards, Jim
 
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