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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got to thinkin about this after lookin' around at all the action with wdi & Ts Enfields in another forum and was curious about the .303 round itself as I do not know that much about it.

Just how does it compare to the ought six (30.06) ... :?:

Accuracy?
Velocity?
Weights?
Modern Time Costs & Availability?

Did one caliber come out before the other and if so which was which or am I correct in assuming that they were kinda born around the same time in different countries ...

In your opinion ... Which round is better or are they somewhat compatible?

TIA

Six
 

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Well there's a lot I can't answer on that but I believe the .303 caliber came out before the 30-06 (though probably not by much of a margin).

I do know that both the .303 British and my 03's are very accurate (in other words they shoot as well as the shooter does).

Costs - 30-06 as a general rule in this country is cheaper (especially where I live). Added to that if it's surplus (the .303) it's bound to be corrosive. Buying non-corrosive .303 is pricey (I pay about $17 a box locally).

When it comes to velocity and that I truly don't have a clue. I do know you can buy .303 ammo in different grains just like 30-06.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks T ...

I have been enlightened ... :idea:

Sounds like they are pretty much equl in a lot of aspects ... :wink:

Six
 

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Thought I'd add what I read here.

IIRC, the .303 started out as the .303 Lee Metford in the 1880s and carried a 220grain LRN bullet over blackpowder (I forget the charge weight). When the Brits changed over to smokeless, they had to change to a 174grain FMJ over cordite (if you pull a bullet on a surplus round, it'll look like spagetti) and then they found they had to change from Metford rifling to Enfield rifling. The Metford rifling used U-shaped grooves whereas Enfield rifling's grooves are square. Later, after WW2, the bullet weight was reduces from 174grain to 150grains.

I've read somewhere- I think it was the 5th Edition Hornady reloading manual, but I'll have to look back to be sure- that the .303 British Service round is on a par powerwise with the US .30-40 Krag round.

Hunting ammo is readily available in my part of the country and a bunch of folks use 'em. I've seen what Winchester's 180grain Powerpoint will do (from a 1918 No.1 Mklll) on a deer. The exit wound in the side of that one deer's head was about as big as my fist was at the time- I was 15, FWIW.

As to available bullet weights, I mentioned 180grain Powerpoint commercially loaded- the Hornady book lists 150grain and a couple of other weights in component bullets.
 

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The power of the 303 is pretty amazing but As far as one being better than the other I would have to say it is a toss up. I have never had a deer or a hog get up after a single shot from either. The 303 though was my first rifles caliber. It was an old p-14. I got my first deer with it and it did it's job for sure. Both are suitable for anything this country has to offer for hunting. Only thing I don't like about the 303 , and it's not really the cartridges fault, is the very large range of bore sizes out there. Even in the brit military rifles I have measured anywhere from .308 to .313. Not very good from a cast bullet handloaders point of view. Not very good for jacketed accuracy either for that matter. You gotta slug the bores on the old war horses.
 

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i've read that 303 is responsible for killing more large game than any other cartridge. if you think about it, it may be true. the brits controlled india and much of africa for a long time.
 

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I can beleive that. Not just in British-controled countries, but here too- there's no telling how many deer, elk, all kinds of bears, cougars (I guess they qualify)... And in British-controled countries, the hunting use of .303 goes all the way back to the 1880s with the Lee-Metford, so...
 
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