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After annealing several Lith cases that had been fired 6 times they were resized. Checking the case HS after resizing all of the cases were .004" too short. The resizing die was set to produce case HS of I.630 +.001", now the annealed cases are .004" under that, why? Art
 

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Can you cut one of each longways down the case and measure the case wall thickness near/below the shoulder/neck?

Perhaps the softer brass pushed back and stayed there better than the harder (shot/resized more without annealing) brass.
 

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Art,
How are you anealing the cases. I had done some research into it but decided not to do it because I normally don't go beyond four resizings. I know annealing softens the brass and works the grain structure. The Lith. brass is hard and if the heat is getting to the shoulder you may be over softening the cases. This could cause the brass to constrict more than the non-annealed cases.

Glenn
 

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Less springback in the newly annealed cases. I have a 6.5 WSSM Savage bolt gun, and I have to anneal the cases, or the brass just simply isn't workable.

Kevin
 

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Less springback in the newly annealed cases. I have a 6.5 WSSM Savage bolt gun, and I have to anneal the cases, or the brass just simply isn't workable.

Kevin
You answered your own question in your statement.
When you fire a cartridge in the chamber, it is like forging it. You have both heat and pressure which causes the brass to harden.
Annealing is only applying heat to the brass, which softens the brass. That's why it is easier for you to size your cases after annealing.
My concern is Art over heating the brass which is causing more of the case below the neck to soften and attributing to his problem.

Glenn
 

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Why are you playing with 6x cases, I think they have had a good life and its time too move on to the next batch.

There no such thing as little brass slaves in the afterlife.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
This Good

Why are you playing with 6x cases, I think they have had a good life and its time too move on to the next batch.

There no such thing as little brass slaves in the afterlife.
Good answer, wish mine was as good, I think it was an experiment to see how many times it could be fired before any separation. Why do that either? Thanks, I'll move on to something else.. art
 

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You answered your own question in your statement.
When you fire a cartridge in the chamber, it is like forging it. You have both heat and pressure which causes the brass to harden.
Annealing is only applying heat to the brass, which softens the brass. That's why it is easier for you to size your cases after annealing.
My concern is Art over heating the brass which is causing more of the case below the neck to soften and attributing to his problem.

Glenn
I didn't answer my own question, as I didn't post one. I gave an example of the answer I gave to Art. GI2
 

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Good answer, wish mine was as good, I think it was an experiment to see how many times it could be fired before any separation. Why do that either? Thanks, I'll move on to something else.. art
Nothing wrong with a little experimentation. By knowing what brass, for example, can't do, you can further understand what it does do.
 

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Good answer, wish mine was as good, I think it was an experiment to see how many times it could be fired before any separation. Why do that either? Thanks, I'll move on to something else.. art
I like to experiment also. The annealing will make the brass more malleable when you resize the cases. Hence the change in case reading w/o readjusting your resizing die. I've had 8 reloadings with Litho brass using my RCBS SB X-die. I've never had any split necks in the batch, but case head separation started to show up. Since annealing is only done in the neck area, and split necks were never a problem, I've never considered going thru the trouble of annealing. I'm currently chucking my cases after 6 reloadings. dozier
 

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I like to experiment also. The annealing will make the brass more malleable when you resize the cases. Hence the change in case reading w/o readjusting your resizing die. I've had 8 reloadings with Litho brass using my RCBS SB X-die. I've never had any split necks in the batch, but case head separation started to show up. Since annealing is only done in the neck area, and split necks were never a problem, I've never considered going thru the trouble of annealing. I'm currently chucking my cases after 6 reloadings. dozier
Thanks dozier, I was wondering where to start calling it quits with the Litho brass I'm getting close to that with some of mine. Some guys using the x-dies reported getting more than 10 reloadings with some brass. I always thought that was too aggressive but 4 and out was too conservative.

I have never annealed a case for my M14/M1A rifles. The cases are toast before the necks get brittle usually. There is a good article on that zediker page below the "Loading M14 Match" article called "Once Fired Twice FRIED" there are some interesting points worth reading in there.http://www.zediker.com/downloads/oncefired.pdf
 

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great question donker2,

I have just run through my brass once. I would love to here some ideas and methods on keeping track of reload counts on brass.

Thanks
 

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I have a friend who marks them with a felt pen. I am looking for something better.
With a bolt gun its easy. But with the M1A??

I'm not hijacking am I?
 

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I have a friend who marks them with a felt pen. I am looking for something better.
With a bolt gun its easy. But with the M1A??

I'm not hijacking am I?
I used to mark my cases w/a felt tip pen. The problem was that tumbling removed the mark. I now mark my cases with an automatic center punch on the case head. Although it adds an operation and is a little time consuming, I can look at the case head and know exactly how many reloadings that case has had. I will ***** punch the case prior to seating the primer. I also weight sort my Litho cases in three lots for light duty, general purpose, and long range/accuracy. Each of these eventually gets loaded with different powder/bullet weights. Depending on where I make my first punch mark, it tells me what my case weighs, and its above purpose. The big advantage is that you can tumble/resize/trim etc., all in one big batch. A quick look at the case head, when checking that the primer pocket is clear lets me sort the cases into each weight batch. A hassle, but I find it's worth it. At the present, I'll scrap my brass after it has 6 dimples on the case head. dozier
 
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