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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a decision to make and it's driving Me nuts...Do I use My H&R walnut stock,or My Winchester Birch stock?I will start off by saying I think Birch is UGLY,and all of My M1's are walnut,but I can't decide here for some odd reason!

My Rifle is an imposter anyway,but it looks at home in the H&R stock with the firing proof and crisp DAS,the other is only marked under the buttplate and triggerguard cutout.Besides the Barreled Receiver all parts are H&R,so that is another positive,but The Birch is so much fatter!

When I'm holding the Birch it feels as if I have a handful,and the Walnut seems awfully slim,I'm just not sure I like that.I also tried a fiberglass stock again and I do not like it.I'll post some pics and look forward to Your input...
Walnut;



Birch

 

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stocks

To Me that birch stock is beautyful... Birch is stronger, you say it is thicker thus stronger. What is the debate? If you want rid of the birch, PM me. 1000m
 

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your birch stock is pretty damn nice, my WW big red birch is basically orange and I just received some stain from Brownell's to try darkening it up to look like yours!
 

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Brudda, da birch bees beautiful. Walnut ain't bad, but the birch is betta.
Semper Fi
 

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Which one feels better when you are firing it? Fatter or slimmer? Which one locks up on your action tighter?

The birch has more character FWIW.
 

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If I were using a wood stock, I'd go Birch, and I'd try really hard for a "tiger striped" Birch. It's such a dang classy look. I almost want to get a cheap airsoft M14, paint the tip black, and find a tiger stripe Birch stock for it and mount it on the wall.

Unfortunately my build is meant to be a completely practical one, so I'm painting on a fiberglass stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The Walnut is tight around the action,but the Birch is SUPER tight.I have to use a dowel and mallet to remove the action when it is in the Birch.I guess my question is kind of lame,and My reason is probably mostly cosmetic as I want it to mimic a service Rifle,and that firing proof and DAS really strike Me.I am collecting WRA parts for a future build and I will probably use the Birch for that in the future,but I want to live in the now ;)
 

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That birch is pretty nice for a birch...but I will be the dissenter....I love walnut.

I bought a REALLY pretty USGI walnut with great grain and sharp stamps for my hopefully in a few weeks, new M1A. If whatever I buy doesn't have a USGI walnut, I am ready...I will ditch any non GI, synthetic or birch stock for sure....at least for my first one!

I am afraid I have been bitten by the bug though, as I also really want to do a Sage EBR now too...
 

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I will also dissent and say that I think the walnut looks better.
 
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If I were using a wood stock, I'd go Birch, and I'd try really hard for a "tiger striped" Birch. It's such a dang classy look. I almost want to get a cheap airsoft M14, paint the tip black, and find a tiger stripe Birch stock for it and mount it on the wall.

Unfortunately my build is meant to be a completely practical one, so I'm painting on a fiberglass stock.
If you would have posted that about three weeks ago... A friend who is big into Airsoft had an M14 that was nothing but problems on the electrical side. After dumping a lot to get it fixed he wanted something more reliable and sold it for a hundred at a pawn shop.
 

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I'm a stock Nut..have 4, and most of the time when I go shooting I use my Hershey Chocolate-brown smooth-side sythetic USGI
 

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If the birch stock is really tight, then shoot it until it loosens up because it WILL LOOSEN UP far sooner than a tight fitting walnut stock. The only way to stop that is to use so much glass bedding, that you basically have a thin veneer of birch over an epoxy base.

Please understand I am not directing this towards any individual, but it is sheer fallacy to think that G.I. birch stocks were or are as good as walnut for gun stocks.

Of course, some people have fallen for an Advertising Campaign started by a person who wanted to sell more G.I. birch stocks. I think that is where this MYTH began.

If you want to use a stock to beat against a rock, yeah, Birch will take a few more whacks before it splits. So what? All that proves is that Birch is SOFTER and WILL COMPRESS MORE EASILY than walnut. That is ALSO why Birch is not nearly as good of wood as walnut for a gun stock.

Birch stocks were made so much larger than walnut because they dent and ding so easily, that the Arsenals wanted to have more wood to RASP OFF the top dented and dinged surfaces and send them back out again.

For anyone who thinks Birch is better, then you might ask yourself WHY Birch was NEVER used on any U.S. Government firearm UNTIL the supply of walnut ran low and prices got so high? MILLIONS of Garands were made in WWII and NOT ONE OF THEM HAD A BIRCH STOCK!!!!

Don't fall for Schlock Advertising Hype, folks. If you want a Birch stock, that's fine. You probably are never going to shoot it enough to realize how much faster it will beat down and shoot loose than walnut. Just know that it WILL beat down faster and shoot loose than walnut.

I hope no one except those Schlock Advertisers trying to sell Birch stocks as better than walnut takes offense to this, but I am REALLY TIRED of hearing or reading that Birch is better than walnut for gun stocks. OK, will now hop down off my soap box.
 

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Use the Walnut and sell me the birch.

I like both, but I would use the one that shoots/feels the best.
 

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the decision is easy.....go with the stock that has the dummy kit. looks great! and even if they both had dummy kits, i'd still go with the walnut. it just looks classic. i agree with what Gus said. walnut is a more rigid wood and anytime i am doing shooting that matters...ie hunting.....i use my best fitting stock which is a walnut. in my experience walnut has just enough "swell" to it that it forms a nice tight fit when i leave my stock on for a long time. dont get me wrong.....im a major sucker for birch, but i find my self collecting birch stocks for their rugged individual character, not their performance. i will say that birch stocks are great platforms for bed jobs though.

i think the best advice i can give you is the same advise i give my self in these situations, and that is: use the stock that allows for better accuracy in your rifle. the best looking rifle is the one that shoots the best! this whole debate about the look of walnut vs birch flies right out window when you are struggling to connect with your target at the range for max accuracy.

i myself like big red birch stocks like yours, to have on scoped rifles. they have a nice stout feel in the grip and seem to "carry" a heavier action well.

having said all that.....i would enjoy the luxury of having two different looking stocks and when you feeling like having a new gun, just swop the stocks. it kinda spices things up when things get stale.ICONWINK
 

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Looks like you got good results on both. I don't know about the marketing side of it. Obviously, whoever was selling birch to USDOD from all the way back to the '60's replacement stocks for the M1 rifle earned a bonus. Just speaking from personal and anecdotal experience, you can expect a sound American straight-grain walnut stock that's snug when new to stay that way through thousands of rounds if you keep it clean of grease, oil, bore solvent, etc. Most of the birch stocks I'm familiar with, mine included, have needed to be glass-bedded to deliver comparable service life.
 

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The decision by the Ordnance Departement to use Birch Stocks as a "Substitute Standard" for walnut was purely an economical and "supply and demand" decision. Walnut in quantity, was extremely hard to get and furniture makers and other wood workers were driving the prices up so much on walnut, that Birch was accepted. I personally believe that was a "stop gap measure" as they were already working on fiberglass stocks.

However, no one should ever doubt that if Walnut HAD been available in quantity and the price of the wood had not skyrocketed, the Ordnance Department would NEVER have accepted birch as a "substitute standard" for rifle stocks.

The problem with any wood stocks as far as DOD was concerned from the late 50's onward, was that you could not effectively clean NBC agents out of the wood easily. This was another reason they developed the fiberglass stocks.
 

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If you would have posted that about three weeks ago... A friend who is big into Airsoft had an M14 that was nothing but problems on the electrical side. After dumping a lot to get it fixed he wanted something more reliable and sold it for a hundred at a pawn shop.
Then I'm glad I didn't speak up sooner, because my wallet been crying for weeks and I just can't get it to stop GI7
 

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I know exactly what you mean brother.
 
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