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Well, they were so impressed with getting their butts kicked, that towards the end of WWII, they developed their own version of the Garand. I just happened to run across this vid:

[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=xUBvrCACNDQ[/ame]

It is a good thing we ended that war sooner than later.
 

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Yeah, this was featured in one issue of The American Rifleman..............last year I think. I'll see if I can dig that issue up. Interesting.
 

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Five countries built M-1 Garands.

While five countries built Garands only two actually manufactured them. The US of course, and Italy before they went to the BM-59. Japan was trying to match the firepower the Garand brought to the battlefield. Korea built an estimated four to seven prototypes of the Garand in the early sixties. It's believed they were attempting to develop a domestic source of the rifle and parts rather than depend on the US or maybe they were being considered as the Asian source of M-1 parts and rifles for those countries adopting the M-1 the same as Italy was picked to supply rifles and parts to those NATO countries that adopted it. BTW, Korea also worked on the M-1 Carbine at the same time probably for the same reasons.

Argentina began work on three rifles to replace the 1909 Mausers that were issue in 1953. The two original competitors were domestic copies of the M-1 and the German StG44. Shortly after work was started they also decided to copy the M-1941 Johnson rifle. Both the M-1 and M-1941 were chambered for the 7.65x53mm, while the StG44 was to stay in its original 7.92x33mm chambering. These rifles were completed and testing started in 1954, but before anything was completed or decided, Argentina adopted the FN-FAL, first buying them from Herstal then manufacturing their own starting in 1960.

One example of the Korean M-1 is at the National Infantry Museum at Ft. Benning, GA, while the only Argentine M-1 is at their National Arms Museum in Buenos Aires.

Information on the Korean and Argentine M-1s came from the Summer 2009 issue of The Garand Collectors Journal.
 

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In the gilded halls of Valhala
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seems like I've seen one that worked just like an american garand , had a octagonal rear sight, and had the imperial flower stamped on the receiver.


anyway heres some museum shots similar to that video i took at the glider museum here in texas.

german guns, ally guns,and my boy shooting the mortar!
 

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Winchester tooling.

The Italian BM-59 tooling was the WWII Winchester tooling. That is why Winchester did not make any M1 Garands during the Korean war.
 

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The first one of these that I saw was about 20 years ago at SARCO over in their old Stirling NJ store. I never knew it existed before that

Had it in a glass case....I recall seeing it and walking toward it thinking "what kind of jived up Garand is this?"

The guy at the counter told me it was the "Japanese Garand" on closer inspection it was in fact quite well made
 
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The first one of these that I saw was about 20 years ago at SARCO over in their old Stirling NJ store. I never knew it existed before that

Had it in a glass case....I recall seeing it and walking toward it thinking "what kind of jived up Garand is this?"

The guy at the counter told me it was the "Japanese Garand" on closer inspection it was in fact quite well made
Half of one, anyway. The stock and bottom metal was missing, IIRC. It was tempting to cobble up the other bits, but it got sold before I worked up the gumption to actually try. Probably a good thing.
 

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This is super cool. I am glad they didnt get it into production before we ended the fight. I guess there is just one more m1 that we can all lust after now
 

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The Italian BM-59 tooling was the WWII Winchester tooling. That is why Winchester did not make any M1 Garands during the Korean war.
Common misconception. Beretta received the tooling, inspected it, rejected/condemned it...and built their own in-house.USN3

I don't think Japan had nearly enough manufacturing capacity left (not in ruins) for them to field their interpretation of the M1 in any significant quantity.
 
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