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Growing up in So.Cal.in the early '60s, we used to see them all. The XB-70, and several others. However, the one that transfixed us all was the X-15. You followed the X-15 by sound (sonic booms) and the vapor trails. Sonic booms also as it passed over us gliding back to to Edwards AFB. What a time to be growing up. :ARM34: - Lloyd BEERCHUG1
 
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Back in about 1973( remember cause my dad had a new 1973 Ford LTD) we went to the Air Force museum. Got to go in the XB-70(was parked outside at the time), went all over Wright Patterson base. Got to do this as my dad's brother( my uncle) was a full bird colonel at the time stationed at Wright Patterson. He did 50 missions in B-17 in 1944/45 as a navigator. He was at one time the navigator in the B-36 that is on display at the museum. Loved watching all the B-52 bombers taking off and landing.
 

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The Mig-25 was built to shoot it down and is STILL in service. It is the fastest aircraft in the world and STILL holds the absolute worlds altitude record and numerous time to height records as well. That is as amazing as the Valkyrie which inspired it.
Nearly of the Russian MiG-25s have been retired in favor of the MiG-31s (MUCH better aircraft). The turning radius of a Foxbat at speed was 150 MILES. Its skin was stainless steel alloy and titanium because aluminum would melt at speed(same as the B-58 Hustler and XB-70). The SR-71 STILL holds the absolute speed record 25 years after its retirement. The Soviets would work feverishly to develop a record challenging aircraft. The "Habu" jockeys would just crack the throttles a little bit more....
 

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http://tacairnet.com/2014/10/27/crash-of-the-valkyrie/

I read the survivor story in Reader's Digest at the time. Apparently the clam-shell escape module sheared off his elbow when closing for ejection...ugghhUSN3 Never forgot that for some reason.
Al White's arm wasn't even broken, but it was caught in the clam-shell doors and pretty bruised up, but he managed to free it before he ejected from the aircraft.

His most serious injury was a back injury. The air bags did not inflate properly and when it hit the ground it subjected White to an estimated 43 gs.
 

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I recall the sign on a large hangar adjacent to LAX (?) that read "HOME OF THE XB-70" and it really was impressive at night when it was lighted. This was around 1966 or 1967. Anyone else remember it?
 
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