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New guy here trying to catch up on M14 info.

My whole life I've been an info sponge . . . I couldn't build a plastic model of a car without getting curious and researching everything I could about that particular model.

Now, here I am with another project to research . . . M14s!

So what is about TRW parts? It seems from reading here they are top of the line? Is it because there are fewer of them? Are they better quality? They are the most desirable, aren't they?

I've bought a few books already, mostly how to clean, basic info, etc. The Big Bible Book recommended here is out of my price range though.

Any information on TRW will be appreciated. Thanks!
 

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TRW was the last company to join the club, so they had the benefit of learning from the early M14 issues.

They were state of the art at forging steel and brought that level of quality to M14 production. They were the only company besides Springfield Armory to build the original factory National Match rifles.

While they didn't really make a lot of replacement parts, they did receive the final contracts for replacement bolts in 1969-70. Many can still be found New in Wrap.

Most of the their parts that are available today are used or reconditioned, as compared to other manufacturers whose parts may still be available NIP, so it's a trade off as to which folks prefer. Their parts are no more accurate or reliable than any others.
 

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TRW and the Chinese made one piece forged op rods while others used the two part welded method.
TRW replacement bolts tend to be slightly longer dimension, which is a plus when attempting to use a USGI chrome lined barrel on a commercial receiver.
All in all, they met spec and that is what Uncle was looking for. I have managed to put together a few mostly TRW builds over the years. This one sports a Kreiger heavy ss barrel in 1-10 and is nested in a USMC smear stock. Named this one the 1st sgt. because he likes to kick butt and take notes. No question who the pro and con marks belong to.

[URL=https://s1180.photobucket.com/user/nf1e/media/nf1e098/1st%20sgt%20heel.jpg.html][/URL]

[URL=https://s1180.photobucket.com/user/nf1e/media/nf1e195/IMG_3341.jpg.html][/URL]

[URL=https://s1180.photobucket.com/user/nf1e/media/nf1e098/1st%20sgt%20left%20side.jpg.html][/URL]
 

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Discussion Starter #4
TRW and the Chinese made one piece forged op rods while others used the two part welded method.
TRW replacement bolts tend to be slightly longer dimension, which is a plus when attempting to use a USGI chrome lined barrel on a commercial receiver.
All in all, they met spec and that is what Uncle was looking for. I have managed to put together a few mostly TRW builds over the years. This one sports a Kreiger heavy ss barrel in 1-10 and is nested in a USMC smear stock. Named this one the 1st sgt. because he likes to kick butt and take notes. No question who the pro and con marks belong to.
Wow, the Chinese op rods are good to go then?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
TRW was the last company to join the club, so they had the benefit of learning from the early M14 issues.

They were state of the art at forging steel and brought that level of quality to M14 production. They were the only company besides Springfield Armory to build the original factory National Match rifles.

While they didn't really make a lot of replacement parts, they did receive the final contracts for replacement bolts in 1969-70. Many can still be found New in Wrap.

Most of the their parts that are available today are used or reconditioned, as compared to other manufacturers whose parts may still be available NIP, so it's a trade off as to which folks prefer. Their parts are no more accurate or reliable than any others.
Is there a source that explains TRW's coding on the parts? How would one learn how to decipher codes on any and/or all M14 parts?
 

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Is there a source that explains TRW's coding on the parts? How would one learn how to decipher codes on any and/or all M14 parts?
TRW barrels, bolts, oprods, trigger housings and hammers are marked TRW.

Original Winchester parts are marked 66118. Sub contracted parts are marked OM-N. Barrels have the Winchester trademark logo.

Springfield Armory parts are marked SA.

Harrington Richardson barrels are marked HR, oprods HRA. Subcontracted parts will be marked HR-?.

Saco-Lowell barrels and oprods will be stamped SAK.
 

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Wow, the Chinese op rods are good to go then?
Nearly all oprods, USGI or commercial are fine. The only ones I have ever seen break were made by Mercury Tool and Machine, back in the 80's. A small number of them have come apart at the weld. They are marked 24411.

Any operating rod can bend at the arm if you use hot loads.

M14's were rough on operating rod tabs because of the dismount notch. The tab will pretty much last forever on civilian rifles.
 

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TRW barrels, bolts, oprods, trigger housings and hammers are marked TRW.

Original Winchester parts are marked 66118. Sub contracted parts are marked OM-N. Barrels have the Winchester trademark logo.

Springfield Armory parts are marked SA.

Harrington Richardson barrels are marked HR, oprods HRA. Subcontracted parts will be marked HR-?.

Saco-Lowell barrels and oprods will be stamped SAK.
The safety is marked TRW as well...………...
 

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"TRW made only made eleven parts during its M14 rifle production. The rest were all subcontracted out. These eleven parts (rear sight base, receiver, trigger housing, hammer, bolt, operating rod, barrel, connector, gas piston, gas cylinder, and flash suppressor) amounted to a little less than 65 % of the cost to the government.

TRW made safeties for a spare parts contract. They are marked on 2 lines TRW then under it is one of the following HT-A, HT-B, HT-C and HT-D They were not on original factory rifles.
TRW did not mark all the parts they made. Unmarked parts from the list above are the following:
Rear sight base
connector
gas piston
gas cylinder
flash suppressor.
 

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But they were actually made by Handy Tool. They will also have HT-C or HT-D stamped on them.

Handy Tool also made safeties for another company, possibly Rober. I forget.
I have C and D above listed... I believe you are correct about Robar, I seem to remember them having HT and suffix on them too.
 

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The receiver ,bolt and op rod that TRW produced would be superior to any other maker simply due to the advanced steps taken during forging.

Each were rough forged like other USGI makers but they took it one step further and used coining dies to futher press forge to an even closer to final shape than any of the other makers.

The bolts were so close to final shape that only a small amount of material remained and some areas required no machining (top and sides).

They were producing finished bolts at a rate of 190 per hour
 

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The receiver ,bolt and op rod that TRW produced would be superior to any other maker simply due to the advanced steps taken during forging.

Each were rough forged like other USGI makers but they took it one step further and used coining dies to futher press forge to an even closer to final shape than any of the other makers.

The bolts were so close to final shape that only a small amount of material remained and some areas required no machining (top and sides).

They were producing finished bolts at a rate of 190 per hour

I'm not a machinist so please permit me what may be a dumb question. Does the additional forging step by TRW actually make the parts "better", or does it just reduce the amount of machining after forging is completed? If it makes the part "better", how is that accomplished?
 

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The further refinements to the metal grain following the key features of each part just adds a little more strength to the final part and the closer to final shape would save machine time.

The receivers were proven during endurance testing to last longer than other makers .
 

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TRW's claim to fame wasn't so much that they were better than anyone else's parts, it was just that their manufacturing techniques were somewhat more advanced than other makers and they had fewer rejects. In fact, TRW is said to have had no rejects of their finished rifles.

One area of contention between commercial and GI parts is that GI parts are always the best choice because there are a lot of tolerance issues in commercial parts compared to GI parts. I believe this is mainly because GI parts went through a much more vigorous gaging and inspection procedure compared to commercial parts. No one really knows how many GI parts were rejected. Due to economics, commercial parts generally pass inspection if they are "close enough". Notice I didn't say close enough for government work...
 

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Ok, this new format sucks. Why is there a picture of an M-1 Carbine on "M14" Forum at the top? Shouldn't it be an M-14? Asking for a friend...…. Gonna have to get used to this all over again...….

Since this is a TRW parts thread, should a safety for a correct new as-issued TRW be completely unmarked? If not, what markings should it have? What would be correct? Also, what are the chances of the same rifle having a KMT marked op rod spring guide? Thanks for all help.
 
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