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So I didn't take my stock all the way down to 150, only 400, and I didn't apply oil in this raw state, I went from 600-1000 alternating dry and wet, with water, then, added teak, so as it I, I have put my initial coat down with a surface prep of 1000 grit, then I decided on the new round to wet sand with teak oil at 600 in hopes to great slurs, which I also dont think is goin on.its currently on it 2nd application of teal oil, and tomorrow will be wet sanded at 800. Should I just start over?
When I refer to wet sanding I am referring to the process shown below which only refers to the use of teak oil (never water). And you start with teak oil when you have the stock sanded and prepped regardless of what your starting point is - 320, 400, 600 etc. Regardless of where you start and stop I.e. You started with 600 and went to 1000 but you need to put 7-8 coats of teak oil on even if you use the same grit when you get to your final grit e.g. 1000, 1500 2000 etc. just keep repeating the process until you get 7-8 coats on.

Here is the process and if you follow my outline in the full posting you should be fine. Sometimes you have to start over - Trust me I made a lot of mistakes and the only way to learn is trial and error. It is a labor of love to do it right.

Next - after filling the grain with the stocks own sawdust, I begin working up the teak oil wet sanding progression. I generally begin by adding a thin coat of teak oil over the entire stock then work up the progression from 320 to 2000"(in my orginal post this was 1000, but I meant 2000). You apply the teak oil, gently wet sand and then take your 2x2 cotton folded up lint free rag and wipe the stock down. You need to let the stock dry overnight, then repeat to the next grit. This is what the stock looks like after wet sanding with teak oil [Still NO Stain at this point]. To follow the entire process you need about 2 weeks and you need patience. Many are not willing to take the required amount of time to use this method as you are talking about 9 days to work up the wet sanding progression.
 

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Thanks

yeah, I understood the difference in the wet sanding with the oil and water. I started cleaning the stock up prior to reading this, with a super limited knowledge of wood work in general. thats why the water was initially being used. and as I have pieced all of this online data together I realized that I had Brought it to a finer grit prior to initial oil application, and was wondering how this would effect the process. I think I have a game plan that will achieve a nice result. Thank you for your help, and excusing the misspelling, it was late and there was a lot of Coors beer involved. I was mainly worried about back tracking in my work, what I am going to attempt to do now that I have 3 full soaks, is do the oil based wet sand at 600 and let the slurry sit, and progressively go from there, there is not enough present I am going to do it at 400. When I finally came to grips how long this was going to take, and how little could be done in a 24 hour period the idea of rushing it and being overly concerned went out the window as well. ill attach a pic of where it is now, because currently I am happy with the progress. Again many thanks for offering help
 

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I was mainly worried about rate of oil uptake at 1000 grit, as thats when it was initially applied, and also the ability to create a slurry to seal grains, late in the game after bringing it to 1000 grit. at this point though....... I think regardless its gonna come out looking pretty nice.
 
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