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As you learned, the chatoyance is there at the very end. I use 1500 and 2000 grain to finish and that's when it really shows up.

As for wax, I've used Howard's Feed n Wax for mine. Renaissance wax is also popular
 

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Having never worked on wood before I have a couple questions to get some clarification on the steps above.

1. Wet sanding. Does that mean, apply teak oil to the entire surface of the stock, via a lint free rag, and then sand the stock while the teak oil is wet?

After the wet sanding, is the stock wiped down and left to dry 24 hours? I dont follow the filling the grain portion of the descriptions.

2. for the final dye. I see a 50/50 mixture of tobacco brown and vintage amber with some alcohol is used. What is the application process for this dye combination? apply lightly with a lint free rag? Allow to dry? then additional coats until you're satisfied with the look?

Is there any sanding with the dye process? or add the dye, then teak oil and sand the teak oil?


I'm re-reading all the steps over again and maybe I'll finally see it... thanks for your answers in advance.
I usually oil my stock for a few days (let it dry between applications) until it's nicely saturated. After that I start wet standing by oiling a section of the stock and sanding it in small lengths (all the same direction with the grain). After wet sanding I get a bit of oil on my hands and rub the stock hard across the grain with my hands (it was described to me as giving it an "indian burn" from childhood) to force slurry into the pores. Let it dry completely, wipe it down, then wet sand again. I usually do 2 treatments of each sandpaper up to 2000.

I've always left my stocks natural colored so I can't help with the dye question

Gun Tree Wood Recreation Trunk
 

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thanks for the reply!

where I need more clarification - adding the stain.

Do you add the tobacco brown to the dark stripes only via a brush, sit for an hour or day, then remove excess? Then add vintage amber to the light stripes only via a brush sit for a hour or day then remove excess? Repeat until satisfied?

The staining step has me.
There are real experts who will help more than me, but my experience with stain is that you could either mix the stains together and put it on at once over the entire stock, or you can do the stains in separate applications over the entire stock. Always a good idea to try it on a test stock before you do anything on your really nice one too.
 
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