M14 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,113 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to expand my emergency food stash from 45 day supply to as much as I can afford.

I have lots of canned goods and rotate them out every year.
I also have 45 days of Mountain house food, shelf life of 7 years

I would like to expand that amount and would like some input from you guys who do believe in emergency food supply's.

Where do you buy from?
Where are the best deals?
Should I save up and buy 6 months of year supply at once or buy 45 day packs each payday till I reach my goal....

I believe many bad things are coming and I don't want "them" to have my by the %@!!s.

Please advise............

Thanks in advance...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
467 Posts
Take your time, and do the regular, constant amount acquisitions / additions to the stash.

Freeze dried chow, put up in #10 cans, will last 25 years if the can doesn't rust. You can find them filled with portions of pork slices, or roast beast, for example... and with some shopping around you can get them for about 30 bucks. That's alot of meat entrees for the money.

freeze dried veggies... same thing. they don't have to be in the tin cans, as Mountain House also does freeze dried stuff in the mylar bags under strong vacuum.

Similarly, you can buy the 7 mil mylar bags yourself, and along with the oxygen absorbant packs put up your own dried beans and other items, like rice, on the cheap. I recently put away 90 pounds of rice for about $35. It should be still good in 20 years, provided no rats chew into the 5 gallon paint buckets, then through the mylar bags.

Just like dollar cost averaging when you're doing long-term investments (401k stuff) putting away food is a long-term project.

Stick to it, and after a while you'll find you're running out of storage space, which isn't really a bad way to be. I mean... what do you need more: the spare bedroom that gets used one or two nights a year, or a two year supply of food for your family?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,113 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
tks

Several Valid points thank you sir.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,649 Posts
Over the years I've expanded my supply from canned goods to include freeze dried, grains and legumes. The bulk of my supply is good for 20-30 years as long as it remains undisturbed. Also you need a good source for potable water for freeze dried rations so a filtration system or stored water are a must have.

One thing that you want to do is to use some of your storage foods in your daily diet so that you and your family will be used to them should the need arise that these will be you only food resource.

Using your storage foods also gives you experience in preparing meals with them and should prevent wastage in emergency situations. There are some creative food preparation methods that can be used, too. No one said surviving has to be boring!

Usually once a month we do a camp in where we simulate a weekend 'emergency'. This practice really hones your skills in priortizing storage items, emergency gear and survival skills. A weekend doesn't seem like a long time, but you'd be surprised at what you'll learn on these camp ins!
 

·
Rest in Peace
Joined
·
17,536 Posts
Bread is suppose to be the staple of life. With where you are at with your food stores I think I would be looking at getting a handcrank grain mill & some whole hard winter wheat. Along with the other ingredients for making pan bread. The reason I like pan bread is you don't have to try to store yeast which has a fairly short shelf life.

HH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,649 Posts
Bread is suppose to be the staple of life. With where you are at with your food stores I think I would be looking at getting a handcrank grain mill & some whole hard winter wheat. Along with the other ingredients for making pan bread. The reason I like pan bread is you don't have to try to store yeast which has a fairly short shelf life.

HH

Affirmative!! I picked up a couple of handcrank grain mills and a couple of books on how to cook with grains. Several recipes on bread, rolls, cookies, cakes and pemmican. My wife is now wanting an electric bread maker cuz she gets tired of cranking ;-) Now there are adapters so that a bicycle can be used to power a grain mill.......................
 

·
Rest in Peace
Joined
·
17,536 Posts
Hooking up to a bicycle is a PITA as you can't reach to feed the hopper. Now means it takes two people to operate or one person constantly on & off the bicycle. You might think about a mechanical foot treadle.

HH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,649 Posts
Yes, we had planned on ganging up on the operation, but a foot treadle probably makes more sense. Maybe a treadle mechanism off an old sewing machine............of course a foot treadle sewing machine has a value all it's own in a SHTF scemario................
 

·
Rest in Peace
Joined
·
17,536 Posts
I have a foot treadle sewing machine which is why I thought of the idea. Construction wise, I don't think it would be hard to duplicate the mechanism.

HH
 

·
Rest in Peace
Joined
·
2,058 Posts
I stocked up a few of the 6 gal buckets of wheat in mylar a few years back. Plus buckets of corn, beans, sugar, salt, etc. Keep them in closets to maximize storage life. Got a grinder but I really need a second wheel (coarse vs fine). My failing is that I haven't tried to actually use any. I make bread from time to time using store-bought stocks, but SHTF is no time to climb the learning curve on grinding my own.

I also try to keep a good stock of oils on hand - lard or vegetable. And of course yeast and baking powder. You could go the sour dough route to stretch the yeast but you're going to need the oils.

Family members snicker at me when they see the buckets in the closets, but I know whose door they'll be knocking on.

Edit: I got most of my supplies from Waltonfeed.com. The 6 gal buckets have the food in mylar bags w/ oxygen absorbers in the bucket. I also have a supply of the non-hybrid seeds so the food grown will produce viable seeds for continuing the cycle.
 

·
Rest in Peace
Joined
·
2,058 Posts
I don't have any 'storage' yeast. I just keep rotating a supply that I keep in the fridge.
 

·
Rest in Peace
Joined
·
2,058 Posts
I keep it in the fridge just to extend the life; it's not required although the shelf life would fall off here in the south. But your original question got me to thinking. Even if it lasted X number of months/years, I'd be down to sourdough after that if I couldn't find another source. Looks like I have some reading to do.
 

·
Rest in Peace
Joined
·
17,536 Posts
I came up with the same problem & couldn't find a long term solution so for long term bread have set up to do pan bread.

Keep us posted if you find an answer please.

HH
 

·
Rest in Peace
Joined
·
17,536 Posts
Here's something on white rice. You make it using two cups water to one cup rice. Using chicken stock instead of the water adds a great flavor to it. So if stocking white rice you might want to do some cans of chicken broth.

I make my own chicken broth. I bring a half pot of water to boil then turn the heat completely off. Drop some chicken pieces in it & put the lid on it. Allow to sit for atleast an hour. The chicken will not be cooked but you end up with a good broth. I don't use any salt when making broth as salt can be added to whatever later. And the chicken cooked on the grill.

HH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
753 Posts
We don't stock a lot of stuff that isn't part of our daily eating. We usually keep a lot of dried beans, pinto, white, red, blackeyed peas. But we eat that stuff and keep it rotated. We eat brown rice as it has fiber and more nutrients in it. We usually have an unopened 50 pounder. If you get into gardening and canning, it doesn't take long to have many months worth of food just canned up without really thinking about it. Best way to put up deer is to can it as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
I cant believe no one has suggested it yet, but you might want to look into your local LDS cannery or the closest one to your area.

The Mormons (CLDS) run their own canneries and will do 20% of their business with non-church members as part of their mission.

You basically order what you want through them in bulk, they pull it from their inventory, then you go up and can it yourself.

I would say over 50% of my charity is in LDS cannery goods (#10 cans). Flour, Wheat (3 kinds), rice, beans, pasta, sugar, powdered milk, quick oats, drink mix, and more. You do the canning yourself at their facilities so they cut you an at cost rate on the food purchase.

You might want to contact your local church or any Mormon friends you have. They really have their stuff together when it comes to this type of thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts
We don't stock a lot of stuff that isn't part of our daily eating. We usually keep a lot of dried beans, pinto, white, red, blackeyed peas. But we eat that stuff and keep it rotated. We eat brown rice as it has fiber and more nutrients in it. We usually have an unopened 50 pounder. If you get into gardening and canning, it doesn't take long to have many months worth of food just canned up without really thinking about it. Best way to put up deer is to can it as well.
When you go to can a deer,how many jars do you plan on having on hand? I assume they are quart jars?

I have been wondering this for a while now. Deer are plentiful now, but I think the smart thing to do would be to can a couple of up right away in a SHTF type of situation.

Thanks,
HD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,584 Posts
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top