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super glue and baking soda

1106 Views 15 Replies 13 Participants Last post by  jkv45
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Duct tape, grey paint, and caulking. If it works for NASCAR, it's gudd enuff for this guy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i wonder if it can be used on body parts?
 
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How ya doing MAC. I remember reading the history of super glue. It was designed for battlefield casualties so the medic/e.r's. could glue skin closed. This would help prevent infection and the casualty from bleeding out compared to stuffing leaking bandages in the wound. Later paramedics and e/r's used it in car crashes and other traumatic injuries.

In '07 I was sideswiped by a car while riding my bicycle to a trailhead from a parking lot. The a-hole drove off and left me. It opened up a "V" shaped tear under my right arm between the wrist and elbow. Even though no vein was torn, blood just ran out. I usually carried a small stack of shop paper towels, so I placed the stack on the tear, and used the belt from my hydration pack to secure it, and started riding to my van, which was parked in an a small airfield parking lot. I also called 911 to have paramedics meet me at my van in said parking lot. They showed up about about 2 minutes after I arrived. The cleaned it up, and as no vein or artery had been cut, ( I wouldn't have made it there if they were cut), the paramedic used superglue to glue most of it closed, then put a light bandage over it. Since I was feeling okay, with not much loss of blood, I did not take the ambulance ride, but was able to get to my house about 2 miles away and have the wife drive me to E.R. for 18 stitches. The tear was V shaped with about 5-1/2" in length. I now have a scar that looks like my E-2 private stripe, under my right arm!!
 
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What’s considered medical grade super glue? Where can you buy it?
Medical grade mainly means it has been sterilized for use in or on the body. The chemical compositions aren't much different from commercial grade cyanoacrylics. We used two different types of "superglue" when I worked as an O.R. Nurse (37-year career). One was a skin adhesive and works just like any superglue you buy and get on your fingers. The glue reacts with moisture in your skin and bonds to it. It replaces skin sutures and reduces scarring significantly, no "stitch scars" once the skin has healed and the glue falls off. This is a more recent use for this type adhesive than the other type we used.

The other "super glue" is a bone cement used in total joint replacements, called methyl methacrylate. It is a two-part glue, sort of like epoxy, and has a very specific working time before it gets hard, to allow insertion of the artificial joint components and to manipulate them into proper position. The components are a powder and a liquid, and once mixed makes a whitish putty that is very thin while being mixed but then becomes the consistency of play-dough after about a minute. Temperature affects the set time somewhat, so we cooled the room when mixing and applying it, you had about 5-6 minutes once mixed to apply it and get the components in place. It gets hot when it cures (exothermic reaction), enough so that it is uncomfortable to hold in your hand but not enough to burn or damage tissue. It goes from pliable to rock-hard in about 30 seconds, and if you make a ball out of it and throw it to the floor, it bounces and sounds like a billiard ball. You can hit the ball extremely hard with a hammer and not crush it. It bonds to bone like you wouldn't believe, and has many of the properties of bone once cured. Bone cement has a couple of different formulations for specific uses in orthopedic and neurosurgery, mainly having to do with consistency and working time. I've taken packages home that were out of date and would have been otherwise thrown away and made stuff from them, much like Jim Horton mentioned. Once cured, you can carve it with a Dremel tool and carbide cutter. This stuff has been around over 40 years.
 

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During the Vietnam War It was found that wounded with shattered kidneys needed something to hold the kidneys together until they could be transferred to to hospitals that could better take care of them. It was found that medical super glue from Sweden was the answer. While it's use was frowned on, doctors in the field continued to use it and it saved many lives and in some cases the kidneys actually healed as a result of this.
 
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