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Discussion Starter #1
I bought some replacement light bulb sockets ( E12 candelabra bulbs ) for a ceiling fan light kit. They came with a cardboard looking sleeve around the socket?? Is this supposed to stay on the socket during use?

I thought cardboard and heat don't go together but anyway?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It stays to insulate the terminal screws. Yes I am a licensed electrician.
Thanks Brian

The socket is open in a open glass bowl so I really don't need it. Since it was made in %^&*( I wanted to make sure it was't going to eventually catch fire!
 

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It stays to insulate the terminal screws. Yes I am a licensed electrician.
What Brian said and I also am a licensed electrician

Light fixtures have gotten extremely cheesy over the past decade or so, personally I really try not to buy anything electrical from”over there” way to much fakery and counterfeit UL products.
 

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Also a licensed electrician.

The tube will prevent you from making contact with the terminals in case you decide to change the bulb with the switch on.

Not the recommended way to change a bulb, but people do.

Also, with that type of bulb holder the hot wire goes to the button, in the center, and the neutral goes to the shell.

Or if the screws are colored, the hot goes to the brass colored screw and the neutral goes to the silver screw.

What type of wire is used in the fixture?

In most fixture cables the neutral can be identified by a raised Ridge running the length of the cable or it could be easy and the wire is white.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Wires are black and white and I think they are 18gauge. Not sure what wire I tied to what terminal but the lights all worked? I know that black is hot and white is neutral. Did not think it made any difference on a 120VAC light bulb...but if I need to check and change the wire I will?
 

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What Brian said and I also am a licensed electrician

Light fixtures have gotten extremely cheesy over the past decade or so, personally I really try not to buy anything electrical from”over there” way to much fakery and counterfeit UL products.
Yep! Recently replaced a fixture in the ceiling. The internals up in the top were all burnt. Could not see it from the outside or from the floor level. Dang near burned down the house. And I had no idea there was a problem!
 

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Did not think it made any difference on a 120VAC light bulb...but if I need to check and change the wire I will?
The light bulb won't know any difference, but if the wires are reversed you will end up with metal parts of the fixture being hot when they are supposed to be at (or near) ground potential. So if you touch them with one hand and ground with the other, you will quickly become unhappy.

Tim
 

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Wires are black and white and I think they are 18gauge. Not sure what wire I tied to what terminal but the lights all worked? I know that black is hot and white is neutral. Did not think it made any difference on a 120VAC light bulb...but if I need to check and change the wire I will?
Putting the wire on the correct screw is a safety issue and a National Electrical Code requirement.

The NEC was created to establish a "standard" for electrical installations.

A simple two wire 120 volt AC circuit will work with the hot and neutral reversed.

Not the safest thing for the next guy to work on, but it will work.
 

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Yep! Recently replaced a fixture in the ceiling. The internals up in the top were all burnt. Could not see it from the outside or from the floor level. Dang near burned down the house. And I had no idea there was a problem!
This is a common occurrence in many homes I've worked on.

The cause of light fixtures burning up is people don't realize fixtures are rated occurring to the maximum bulb wattage.

Most fixtures are rated for 60 watt bulbs.

Not uncommon to find 100 watt bulbs installed in fixtures.

The increase in wattage increases the heat, so the toasted wires, wire nuts, and damaged sockets are a result of the heat from the higher wattage bulbs.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Putting the wire on the correct screw is a safety issue and a National Electrical Code requirement.

The NEC was created to establish a "standard" for electrical installations.

A simple two wire 120 volt AC circuit will work with the hot and neutral reversed.

Not the safest thing for the next guy to work on, but it will work.
Wiz1997,

I used 120VAC plugs for many decades where both tabs were the same size. I woke up a while back and noticed that one tab is wider now and plug will only go into recepticle ONE way! I guess that fixes your hot and neutral wire direction. Thanks for the education. Sparks and Magic was not my favorite subject in school.
 

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Wiz1997,

I used 120VAC plugs for many decades where both tabs were the same size. I woke up a while back and noticed that one tab is wider now and plug will only go into recepticle ONE way! I guess that fixes your hot and neutral wire direction. Thanks for the education. Sparks and Magic was not my favorite subject in school.
There are plenty of ways to do it wrong.
tumblr_88ff4befdbc13097ae3c05cbe6077e8e_78fe42ee_640.jpg
 

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I woke up a while back and noticed that one tab is wider now and plug will only go into recepticle ONE way! I guess that fixes your hot and neutral wire direction.
Yes, IF (!) the plug was wired correctly (oh, and the breaker that drives it, too).

Every household should have one of these things in its junk drawer:


Just plug it in and see if the correct lights come on. Very useful and foolproof.

Tim
 

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Similar topic, When installing a fixture with stranded wire to the solid wires in my house, I tinned the stranded wires with solder before joining to solid wires with wire nuts. A neighbor said this was a poor practice as they could come apart. Have you guys heard this?
 

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I'm another in the many electrical pros on this site. Wire nuts are designed to be used on bare copper. Many people like to twist the wires before screwing the connectors on, but this is not the suggested way per the manufacturer. That being said, it can be a scary thing when on a ladder and you unscrew a 277v circuit and a hot wire comes jumping out of the group! As for tinning, as long as the tinning is done SPARINGLY it shouldn't present a problem, but I've never felt the need to do it when combining stranded and solid wire. I just twisted the stranded wires a little more tightly before inserting into the wing nut.
 

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Wow, there's sparkies galore in this neighborhood. I'm a RETIRED Electrician (finally).

To the OP, I spent many years telling Apprentices there's no such thing as a stupid question, just an asked one.
 
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Nope, holes flow. :)
Old Navy avionics tech. The only service that taught hole flow over electron flow, I believe. :)
 
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