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That's pretty interesting Ron, but what is the setup that you're using? I've worked on computer control software for various CNC machines, but have only a passing introduction to the tool itself.

Are you using the lathe as a type of vice? I see the ram that's forcing the grease into the barrel, but I can't see what's between the ram and the muzzle. Is that a commonly used tool or is it a special arrangement made up just for this job?
 

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Very interesting, thanks much for sharing.
Any idea how many PSI was involved there to move that case?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Bullet press

That's pretty interesting Ron, but what is the setup that you're using? I've worked on computer control software for various CNC machines, but have only a passing introduction to the tool itself.

Are you using the lathe as a type of vice? I see the ram that's forcing the grease into the barrel, but I can't see what's between the ram and the muzzle. Is that a commonly used tool or is it a special arrangement made up just for this job?
As far as I know, that is the only tool of its kind in use. I did a lot of research before I built it to see if I could find a yes or no as to if it had been tried or would work but came up with a big fat zero. Common sense told me that it should work, so I built it.

Here's a link that explains how the tool is made and used:

http://www.homegunsmith.com/cgi-bin/ib3/ikonboard.cgi?act=ST&f=3&t=29914
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Psi

Very interesting, thanks much for sharing.
Any idea how many PSI was involved there to move that case?
Well, when I built the thing I looked up the clamping force of the 3/4 x 16 TPI thread in the Machinerys Handbook and according to that the clamping force is 26,000 PSI with grade 8 bolts. So I guess you could apply that to PSI. I have pressed out dozens of bullets and cases with it and so far nothing has beet it.

ADD NOTE:

The only change I have made to the design was to the steel main piston body and the brass piston seal. The main piston body was originally made from O1 tool steel taken to it's full harness and not drawn so that it would not pick up or gall against the barrel of the device. Unfortunately, it couldn't take the force in this state and it split down the center. A new piston was made from Stressproof 1144PH and two seal fits were made and rubber O rings installed to keep it from contacting the barrel. A seal fit was also added to the rear of the brass seal to act as a wiper. I've had no problems since.
 

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As far as I know, that is the only tool of its kind in use. I did a lot of research before I built it to see if I could find a yes or no as to if it had been tried or would work but came up with a big fat zero. Common sense told me that it should work, so I built it.

Here's a link that explains how the tool is made and used:

http://www.homegunsmith.com/cgi-bin/ib3/ikonboard.cgi?act=ST&f=3&t=29914
Very nice indeed! Thanks for posting about your inventive tool.
 

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I have a live .50cal round that's stuck inside a forward half of another .50cal case. Supposedly this was not uncommon on aircraft mounted M-2's and the #1 reason for jams.
 

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I didn't know Norinco makes a .50cal for export, so I had to start looking around.
Do you know if this was a NSG-50 .50, the barrel and receiver doesn't look like the M99/M99B.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
50 bmg

I didn't know Norinco makes a .50cal for export, so I had to start looking around.
Do you know if this was a NSG-50 .50, the barrel and receiver doesn't look like the M99/M99B.
Look-see. Dunno if you Mercans can buy them. I don't think your gubberment and Norinco are playing well together right now.

https://www.canadaammo.com/product/detail/da50-50-bmg-36-upper-receiver/

I think they use a standard AR type lower to make them go bang. $1,500 CAD is around $1,150 USD.
 
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