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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Aloha!

I am following up on a previous post that discussed the bottom of the M14 type rifle receivers... I am sure we all checked our rifles, right? Yeah, right... :lol:

Anyway, I have been looking at the USGI stocks that I have and found that many of the stocks, although USGI, have been but or milled differently. Some are cut for the step near the receiver leg and some have been cut for the receivers with the step near the heel.

I took a SA pre-ban (#018,xxx) that I was working on and when I put it in a really nice wood stock, I noticed the back of the receiver (the heel) floating with about 1/16" off the stock. But there was GREAT contact between the forward section of the receiver to stock. Hmmm.. of course this looked odd... but I didn't want to modify my nice wood stock just yet...

So I looked at several of my other stocks, all of the wood ones were cut similar to the way the first one was (I checked 6 woodies). Of course, it would be simple enough to fix, but I wanted to check more...

So now, I took out a "trusty" WhamoCamo stock and "Lo and Behold" it was cut perfect for this receiver. So I left it in the WhamoCamo stock for now...

Unlike most people, I use the woodies for my "everyday" stocks and use my WhamoCamo collection for my "presentation" or picture taking... but this does raise some very interesting thoughts... especially about "receiver fit".

SixT... if you get people noticing that the stocks don't match the receiver perfectly, then its because of what I have been playing around with... receivers and stocks are NOT always cut the same!

I think I will need to ID specific stocks to specific rifles and keep that arrangement after I fit the stock to the receiver. That will insure that each receiver will sit properly, at least, in the stock.

Just some observations.

Aloha and Best Wishes,

Tom O.
 

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Stock fit

This is quite interesting, because I have a Whamo stock, and the heel of my receiver rides high at the rear, just as dighawaii mentioned for his wood ones. Perhaps this could be the result of different vendors providing stocks to the military. The rifle manufacturers may all use different sub-contractors who provide slightly different products. In my line of work (jet engines), it's not uncommon to see slight variations. Just a thought.

Darrell
(dperr)
 

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Just the opposite of what dig had Darrell ... :arrow:

Tom and I have been discussing this scenario and it is "the norm" so to speak altho it upsets some folks in that they feel their "cosmetic appearance" is not correct with a bit of a gap visible here or there. Even though this is quite evident in some cases it does not necessarily mean that ones receiver is not locked down properly and it does not necessarily mean that your accuracy will be greatly affected ... Its basically "the norm" as I said earlier and it is a symmetrical composite thing with various stock manufacturers and receiver models.

Some have bedded these areas as well ...

Thanks for supplying that info Tom ... :wink:

Six
 

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i've have about 8 synthetic stocks only 1 M1a so far. all the stocks have the same markings on the inside and they all fit the same. maybe there were different batches? or is it just the woodies that have the seating issues?
 

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American Rifleman "Armorer's M1A Comments" March,

The March '82 American Rifleman has some interesting M1A comments from Hugh Palmer (Armorer from PA Rifle & Pistol Assn.) that address M1A receiver/stock fit as it affected accuracy in bedded M1A match rifles. A part of this brief article is quoted below:

On the lower right rear of the M1A receiver, a ridge extends from where the selector tang would be located on the M14 forward to the receiver leg. When the M1A receiver is placed in an M14 stock, this ridge contacts the stock before it is fully seated, and a clearance cut must be made to prevent this. It is possible to glass-bed an M1A without making this cut, and all seems to go normally until the trigger guard is partially closed. Then the front of the receiver pivots to the left. This movement can be masked by the barrel-locating fixture, but you still end up with the barrel pointing toward 11 o'clock and all sorts of accuracy problems. I have examined M1As built by others (including some excellent service armorers) that suffered from this same problem.

Mr. Palmer included a diagram shoving the stock the clearance cut described and clearance required. For those who may be interested the complete article is found on pages 70 thru 72 of the March '82 Rifleman.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Aloha,

Dperr: I have discovered that there are many variations of the way stocks were created and with the variations on the receivers, it will be normal to find gaps in the heel (like you have) or between the heel and the receiver legs (looking from the side). I don't know why these variations in the stocks are there and appear in the wood and synthetic stocks.

SixTGunr and I were just discussing last night that this must have also been the case during VN and did not seem to affect "battle field" accuracy and was not even noticed or written about. Of course, in war, you want the enemy to go down when shot and that was all that counted.

However, I think MRJ found some interesting information that he posted. To make a specific stock fit a specific receiver is not a huge task, IHMO, but needs to be thought through and undertaken with care. The ridge that is described in MRJ's post is what I believe causes the heel to lift when using a receiver with the step cut in the heel section not near the receiver leg. Removing this ridge about a 1/16" ridge would allow the receiver heel to sit flat to the stock. This is without "bedding" the stock, just removing the tiny ridge.

According to information that I came across, it is preferred by GunSmiths that bed rifles to have a small visible gap (1-1.5") between the receiver leg and the heel of the rifle, which will allow a fulcrum affect when locking in the trigger group.

So, in any case, if you prefer to have the receiver contact points sit flat to the stock, then some mods may be needed to make this happen...

I hope this helps, good luck and let us know if any of you make these mods...

Aloha and Best Wishes,

Tom O.
 
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