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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My great nephew got a S&W 5906 9MM for Christmas and wanted me to show him how to shoot.

After a safety talk, I started him this afternoon with my Kimber 1911 22. I started him up real close so he could see his mistakes. When he begin to pick up the basics; breathing, sight alignment, trigger control, follow thru, I let him switch to his 9MM. After a few shots and learning the benefit of a consistant grip, he begin to get some decent groups. I then had him try my F.E.G. Hi-power. It is very accurrate but with a very rough trigger pull. Once he got the feel for it and some decent groups, he went back to his pistol and shot it like a champ. He would swap some between my Kimber and his 5906, improving all the time. I let him try my Colt 1911 and he loved it. He wound up shooting 10 shot groups with 6-8 almost in a ragged hole out to 25ft. He's wanting to know when we can shoot again.

With new shooters, I like to start them with good hearing protection and at a range of only a few feet. It's discourging for them to miss the entire target, so I move them where they can't miss at first. Also on hearing protection, the muzzle blast does more to induce finch than anything.

Looks like I have a new shooting partner.

Joe A.
 

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Good post, nice to see new faces being brought into this great sport.
I think if we don't bring the new faces in, that we might be seeing our numbers shrink till we no longer have a loud voice in the political system. :cry:

I'll get off the soapbox. Good to see you had a great time with your
great nephew. :D
 

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Congrats Joe :!: I agree with your teaching technique, because I use the same approach whether it's a youngster or adult. Seems like your great nephew has an excellent teacher :)
 

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great

My son will hit the 1 year old mark in another few days, and I'm already thinking about the days when I can teach him how to shoot. Also thinking about what weapons I will get/give to him when he is older.

I can't wait to start him on his first pellet gun , .22 rifle/pistol, Mini 14, and then the big boy M14 (LRB/TRW EBR) that is on its way.

Ain't life grand!
 

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Hey There, Mitch. :D

Please wish your son a big Happy Birthday from his Firing Line friends when the day comes. We'll be here waiting for his first range report when you get him all set up with his M14. \:D/

I kind of envy you, my friend. :D Some of the best times I ever spent doing anything, were teaching my kids gun safety, target shooting, then hunting. My son got his first .22 rifle when he was 11 because that's when I got mine. In fact, it was the same rifle.

Now, my grand-daughter is going to get it when she's 11, her Dad's gonna teach her how to shoot - with grandpa's old Model 1906 Winchester single-shot .22 rifle. Of course, I had the gun checked and reconditioned when I gave it to my boy and he'll send it back to the gunsmith when it's Sara's turn to shoot it. \:D/

Have a good one.

db
 

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Great going Joe :p 22 is the perfect choice of weapon to start the youngsters on. One mistake I see in a lot of parents is they wont let them handle a firearm till they are old enough. I think this is wrong. kids are courious. You can telll a kid not to touch the stove because it could be hot. Will they listen no. Sooner or later they will get burnt, just because they have to find out for them selvs. Need to take that curiostiy out of the kids early. When my son inquired for the first time what I was holding (maybe age three or four) I unloaded the pistol and let him hold it. As he got older and comprehended more I would show him what I was doing before I handed it over and he should do the same. By the time he was old enough to shoot he wasnt afraid of the pistol and new the basic safty precausions of a handgun like to check to see if loaded, point in a safe direction etc. and the curiosity of just wanting to pick up that pistol was long gone.
 

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I started my girls (now 14 and 12) on the same Glenfield .22 rifle I learned on at the same age I learned to shoot - 4 yrs. old. They can recite the safety rules from memory, as they were not allowed to look at any of my guns until they told me "the rules".

Now they are both crack shots with the .22 single shot rifles and with the addition of a Ruger 22/45 they have become quite good with the pistol. My oldest is scared of the 1911A1 .45ACP, but the youngest loves it!

Neither one of them have expressed much interest in the M14 :cry: as they think it's too heavy.
 

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These posts made my wk. !!

Gentlemen your posts have made my wk. :D :D :D
Over 55 yrs ago,my Father & Grandfather, introduced & trained me in the use of firearms ( Sanders, your "RULES" sound like those I heard then. THE RULES DO NOT CHANGE.)
Over the years, I became aware of a VERY SAD fact, IE: the majority of the youth of today DO NOT have the mentors we had, for 1 reason or another.A couple of yrs ago, I became semi- retired & decided to use my experience, training & certs. to assist in addressing the problem. ( in addition to my existing NRA certs ( civilian - the others weren't applicable ) I picked up a couple of others, incl. a WA ST Hunter Ed. cert. ( over 60% taking HE are youth. ) My MAJOR projects for this year are a W.WA BSA training camp, for adult NRA Instr. cert ( Sm. bore rifle, shotgun, & muzzle loading rifle ) $ WA ST. HE Instr. cert. Also 2 WA St. HE Jamborees in W.WA ( expected Attendees = 300+ youth ) later this summer.
Do I still train adults ? Yup, But the rewards from training youth FAR exceed those of training the adults TRY IT YOU"LL LOVE IT :lol:
Am I bragging, NO !! I am humbly posting this to say thanks to the above & others who take the time to pass on the TRADITIONS of our sport & to encourage others to do the same.

The Proffesor 8O :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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I have seven and eight years left until I take each of my girls to the range to take care of their first shots through a .22.

I'm so anal about gun safety that when my oldest got a squirt gun, I pitched it in the trash when she wasn't looking. Call me nuts, but I don't want her ever confusing a firearm with a toy.

One of the funniest things has been when my three-year-old would run into our bedroom at 8 a.m. on Saturday mornings, pull me out of bed and say, "Daddy! Time for your boomstick show!" My wife put her up to that. :D Too bad History Channel recently moved "Tales of The Gun" from its 8 a.m. CST slot.

I was just thinking the other day about the first time I shot a Garand when I was 12. It was almost 22 years ago, and the "Old Salt" who caught me eyeballing it at the range did all the right things: said I could shoot it if my Dad said I could, showed me its operation before putting a round in, and watched me like a hawk when I lined it up for the first shot. Still have that first piece of .30-06 brass layin' around somewhere. That was one of my best shooting memories...

Spike
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Spike,

One thing I did with my 2 children once they got up from the toddler stage was to carry them out with me and show them what a shotgun would do to a sapling and a watermelon at close range. That made quite an impression on them and they could then realize the danger. I explained to them that once that shot is fired, it can never be called back and for them to imagine if that watermelon was someone.

I never told my 2 children not to touch any of my firearms. That just raises curiousity. I told them if they wanted to handle one my firearms, to always tell me and I would make sure it was safe for them. It worked for me and my 2. That was the days before gun safes were availiable like they are now.

Also, a person must be aware about their children's friends.

Joe A.
 

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I've started two sons, a daughter, and two step-daughters on the way to enjoying shooting. The sons and daughter were all in the 7-8 range, and the step-daughters in the 12-13 range ( I hadn't met their mother prior to that).

Safety was discussed prior to ever setting foot on the range. My sons could even point out the differences in cartridges. Shooting was at 5-7 yards. I was more interested in the proper handling at first, but all were concentrating on sught picture by the end of the first lesson. We used an indoor range that first trip, as about all the time needed was an hour. After that, they were exposed to my DoD Clubs shoots. :D
 

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Joe A. said:
Spike,

One thing I did with my 2 children once they got up from the toddler stage was to carry them out with me and show them what a shotgun would do to a sapling and a watermelon at close range. That made quite an impression on them and they could then realize the danger. I explained to them that once that shot is fired, it can never be called back and for them to imagine if that watermelon was someone.

I never told my 2 children not to touch any of my firearms. That just raises curiousity. I told them if they wanted to handle one my firearms, to always tell me and I would make sure it was safe for them. It worked for me and my 2. That was the days before gun safes were availiable like they are now.

Also, a person must be aware about their children's friends.

Joe A.
Hey Joe. Thanks for the feedback, sir.

Honestly, I'm going to hold off on the "live fire demonstration" 'til they're a bit older. My eldest is very sensitive, and I think the sound alone will scare the wits out of her.

I know about "forbidden fruit" only raising their curiosity, and am trying to keep it in check. She's shown little more than passing interest (once she saw me at in my in-laws' basement cleaning my Beretta and she said, "Daddy's giving his boomstick a bath").

We live in an area where guns are not prevalent (my stuff, as many of the Board members know, is in Indiana), so we have limited possibility of her encountering one. But that being said, when she gets a bit older, we'll talk about the dangers and what to do when she's alone at a friend's house and encounters what a friend might pull out of their parents' drawer...

Spike
 
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