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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've tried just about every method known to clean brass (walnut, corncob, ultrasonic, etc) but I'm thinking stainless steel media might be the best yet. I tried it on a batch of Lake City 67 pull down brass yesterday and I was impressed! It made that 40 year old brass look brand new! It didn't get all the asphaltum mouth sealant out of the necks but still...

Note to self: Clean out the necks with a stiff nylon brush dipped in acetone before tumbling next time.

I'm just a happy customer sharing what I learned with you guys. This level of shine is probably not needed - but the stuff works! Only downside is you need a rotary tumbler.

Got it here (they have instructions too):

http://stainlesstumblingmedia.com/index.php

 

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I have really been considering using this type of media. It really does get the inside clean which is the goal, but man the cost is so high initially. The good thing is the media last forever! Glad to see you have had great results, keep us posted on the long term results. Did you use their recommended method? Or create your own?
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
SingleSotVictor,

I followed their instructions to the letter. Plus, I had all that stuff in the kitchen cabinet anyway. I was using 30mm ceramic beads before, but with them I had to leave the spent primers in place (the beads would get stuck in the primer pocket). The stainless steel rods don't have that problem and they work with all brass - no need to use different sizes for different cases. I'll probably still use ceramic for the initial cleaning of blackpowder fouled 45-70 cases (that's what I got it for initially). Sorry, the media doesn't work with a vibratory tumbler. When you consider the cost of replacement corn cob or walnut media this may be cheaper in the long run. I haven't tried it on .223 Remington cases yet but I'll let you guys know.

P.S. I cleaned a second batch of pull down brass and hit the inside of the necks with acetone and a Dewey Nylon brush (my preferred method). They came out shiney and no black gunk to foul up the loading dies (that stuff gets all over expander buttons)
 
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