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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Troop I was just packing away another 2K M80 rounds and
was thinking that I do not want to burden the bottom cans with to
much weight being stacked on them.

I like to be able to move my cans around some when searching
for something in particular. Having 20mm and 30mm cans full
they, the big 30mm cans with 6 latch downs are to heavy to move
when they are full.

So short of crating again what do you think is the tallest you should
free stack without ruining the rubbers? Or do you free stack then gap
with wood slats and stack again? My pallet racks are hard enough to
reach across so most of the cans are on the basement floor.
 

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USGI ammunition cans are not designed to be stored outside of their wooden crates. DA Pam 385-64 and Army Material Command Drawing 19-48-75-5 dictate that the cans will stay in their crates and the crates will stay above the floor on a pallet. This is to allow air circulation and ensure the integrity of the the cans.

The recesses for handles that are on the bottom of the cans are to allow safe temporary stacking of uncrated cans just prior to use, such as on ranges, issue points or defensive positions.

If you are using the cans for serious long term storage, I recommend arranging them in a manner that metal is not against metal.
 

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I stack my GI 50 Cal cans 4 high at max, but they are not all full. Usually they set individually on a 4x12 wood shelf. Been doing that for 40+ years, no problem.
 

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I have significant quantities of ammo stored ( we are talking 100,000 rds +) - I use pallet racking but built 2x12 shelving in a rack "bay" to stack them. I do not go more than two cans high, but mostly because it seems the can I want is always on the bottom and it is harder to get two cans off the top of it. I also label my cans on top an end . Ammo that is in the orginal crates stays in them as it is easier to stack that way. the large 20mm type cans work ok for bulk belted ammo storage but they are all on the floor level with nothing on top.
 

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I also usually stack my .50 cal USGI ammo cans no more than four high. Although I have around 80 cans that are full and are in storage so I have some stacks that are six cans high. I also have several four can M1 ball HXP cases which I have stacked under a truck bed type tool box that is also full of spam cans of HXP. Hopefully I'll have my ammo storage area built soon and I will be able to bring my supply home. I will probably build an industrial type rack above my large orange truck bed tool boxes to store my . 50 cal cans on........... I'm also installing twin 6" steel beams that I'll set my gun safes on and drill and tap holes to bolt my safes onto.
 
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The M2A1 and M19A1 ammunition cans are fairly sturdy items. The static crush load is upwards of 1000 pounds. The major problem is that they are not very stable when stacked high and are prone to tipping over.

The reason the military like to keep them in the wood crate is not because the wood frame gives so much strength, but 1) a wider base to prevent tipping, and 2) side protection from puncture. They are packed 6 high on a pallet.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have been stacking mine 4 high on the 50 and 30 cans. I have not experienced any failures and check the rubbers when opening the can. Funny thing is that some will suck in air on opening.

I went last Friday to a local surplus outfit that had cans for sale, the 20 and 30mm Navy Mark 1 Model 0 cans are hard to find and they had two that were in great condition. I do not stack the Navy cans if they are full as the crush weight is pretty good if loaded with 30 or 50 caliber, and shotgun buck rounds. When packed with 208 rds of 20mm at 150 pounds, had to be some Stout Sailors handle them. The Navy stacked them in magazines on ship.

I have to ask, is there anyone on the forum that has been in the ships magazine storage lockers and seen how high they stack the mark 1 cans? The last cans I bought were made in 55' and are the newest ones I have.

I don't mind paying 8 or ten bucks on a 50 can but now around here local they are wanting 18 to 20 because they are used Military. New U.S. 50 cans are 20 dollars and now I see chinese ones for 13. I bought 8 used for 80 dollars from the pawn shop and thought I was getting a deal. And maybe I was.
 

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I don't mind paying 8 or ten bucks on a 50 can but now around here local they are wanting 18 to 20 because they are used Military. New U.S. 50 cans are 20 dollars and now I see chinese ones for 13. I bought 8 used for 80 dollars from the pawn shop and thought I was getting a deal. And maybe I was.
You did get a deal....

Last time I saw 8 dollar .50cal cans they were Chinese at wallyworld. My go to LGS usually always has a pallet of used USGI cans sitting on the floor. At $20 each/ (2) for $35 they don't last long thanks to the %#@*&^%^%$##!!!! panic buyers. I was in this past tuesday and they were gone, replaced by two pallets of plastic ones. I don't need more mind you, it was just another casual observation of the goins' on around me.

Thanks to....well....you know.... just pick one or more reasons, it is no longer a matter of getting what you want or need, but getting what you CAN while you still can.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yep the latest hoarding meltdown has bumped the prices on "stuff" again. I keep acquiring as I happen into deals that can not be passed up.

I like to keep 8 or 10 cans empty around when either I feel like reloading or buy ammo at a "fair" price. Not only do I buy them for ammo storage or for pistol, rifle parts but I use them when fishing as they float. Many uses for them in the garage, shop, on the tractors, well they are useful for many purposes.
 
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