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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This is my mauser bolt action. It's a 1909 Argentine (known as being among the finest Mauser actions built) sporterized, rechambered in 270, and mounted in a stock fitted by Sycamore Hill Design in Rochester. They also did the checkering by hand.

It's certainly a vintage design, but I've handled a bunch of 700s while attending Armorer's school at Remington, and none of them had the personality and character of this rifle. I still have yet to sight it in since it was mounted and bedded, but I expect good results. The optic is an old Redfield 3-9, which I think fits in with the vintage nature of the gun.




 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. This one came from an uncle that passed away, and was originally in a left handed stock.

Someone put a lot of work into this one. Sometimes I worry about shooting a gun that was made by hand over 100 years ago, but since it headspaces fine and shoots without any issues, I plan on enjoying it.
 

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That is a beautiful rifle. The 98 Mauser is a true classic, and the folks that designed and built yours put some real thought and care into the setup. Beautiful stock, high straight comb intended for scope use, scope low and tight to the action.

A 98 Mauser set up like that could go to Africa on big game safari. That rifle will do whatever you need it to do for the rest of your life. Well done sir.

I'd like to see a photo of the left side of the receiver area to see how the smiths dealt with the thumb cut in the receiver for stripper clips. On a sporter like this, it is traditional to just not worry about the stripper clip guide since the scope prevents stripper clip use anyway, and yours is modified in the usual fashion where the raised portion of the clip guide on the receiver is milled away to leave a flat surface for the scope mount. However, the cutaway in the left receiver wall is still there and I'd like to see how your smith/stockmaker handled that.

The 98 Mauser is a fine example of something that was designed over 100 years ago and is so good that it can't be improved upon. A "modern" action like the Rem 700 has its own advantages, but in the "built like a tank and will ALWAYS work" category, the 98 Mauser is still king. GI1
 

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Just the way a "classic custom" should look. Practical & Beautiful.
 

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How does the safety work?

Am I correct to assume only the up position is usable and you can't lock the action?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Correct, due to the optics a two position safety is installed, it's either locked or ready to fire, no locked by able to chamber.

I'll get a picture of the inside of the receiver to show the stripper clip guide area.
 

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Does this pic help with the stripper clip guide question?

Please pardon the dust, I didn't notice it until I saw the photos. Mega Dusty!
Yes it does. They left the stock straight and smooth right over the thumb cut since it is very unlikely to ever be used. Nice.

It actually looks like the smith didn't do any machining at all to the raised clip guide area on the receiver.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I wish I knew which gunsmith sporterized the rifle. I bought the rough-finished stock from a person on the mauser central forum, and Sycamore Hill cut it and bedded it. My uncle passed away before I realized how many guns he had, and this was the gem of the bunch in my eyes (that, and a .222 anschutz). The only hint I have is the "A. Mock" on the barrel, but I haven't found out anything with that info.

Whoever it was, they did a hell of a job.
 

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This is my mauser bolt action. It's a 1908 Argentine (known as being among the finest Mauser actions built) sporterized, rechambered in 270, and mounted in a stock fitted by Sycamore Hill Design in Rochester. They also did the checkering by hand.

It's certainly a vintage design, but I've handled a bunch of 700s while attending Armorer's school at Remington, and none of them had the personality and character of this rifle. I still have yet to sight it in since it was mounted and bedded, but I expect good results. The optic is an old Redfield 3-9, which I think fits in with the vintage nature of the gun.

]
Correction on the model, it is a 1909 Argentine NOT a 1908. 1908 are Brazilian.

Yes they are very desirable actions because of the craftsmanship and the hinged floor plate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I will need to see a range report on that Steel. What a fine job you did.
I wish I could take credit for the whole thing. My aunt gave it to me after my uncle passed away, and of all the guns he had, this is the one that caught my eye. The rest were sold to help her pay the bills. Well, except for a nice S&W 686-3, but that's another story...

The only thing I did was pick out the stock and have Frank work his magic on it. I can't wait to shoot it, I'll report back when I have.

Was this done by Jack hammrick?
I don't know. I don't even know if my uncle knew. The only hint I have is the markings on the barrel, and I can't find out anything about the name on there.

Thanks for all the positive feedback guys. It's funny, without even knowing a thing about Mausers I was drawn to this rifle.
 

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That's one fine looking rifle, steelratt.
 
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