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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to load for my rifle using good used military ammo. I know I'll have to do additional prep on the primer pockets, etc., but no problem: I understand it's tougher, thicker brass, etc.

Another related question though: does military brass ever or always require neck turning to ensure an easy fit (and easy chambering) in a possibly slightly tighter commercial chamber?

And: if a person is going to all the trouble to properly prep new brass, would it be a good or reasonable idea to ream the primer pocket just a "thou" or so deeper in my one-time brass prep, along with trimming the cart. OaL to, let's say, the middle of the recommended length (after first-time firing of course...)?

I will be using RCBS's X-Dies to control brass growth, as well as slightly reduced loads. (Why go for your own personal Chernobyl, after all?)

Finally, does anyone here take the time & trouble to anneal their brass after 3 - 4 firings? If I'm going to limit my brass to a maximum cycle of 5 reloads (since this rifle is notoriously hard on brass...*), I'm wondering if annealing is worthwhile It may be: you guys are the experts.

Still looking for CCI #34 mil spec primers. Any other prime maker have a mil-spec large rifle primer?

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* Back then I didn't know any better and owned a match-grade polygonal-bbl'd match-grade H&K G3 up in socialist Kanada. Before the nation-wide recinding of common sense and the banning of that particular rifle, I reloaded it's brass, as I recall, about 8 - 10 times! I didn't anneal (couldn't even spell it!), but did give up on a particular batch of brass when the heads started coming off, primers fell out or the cartridge necks split.

The carbon fluting marks on the brass didn't bother me, and I had one of their rubber ejection port buffers in place, but still: people now say you shouldn't even consider reloading this brass at all, since it goes through such a thermal and physical hell in those rifles!

Sure was an accurate succa though! < 1" always, with most any ammo!). I wonder who has it now, spirited away in their basement awaiting TEOTWAWKI...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
"Raise your hands and drop the ammo!!

I anneal my brass and although many people throw out their cases after 4-5 firings I go by what the brass is telling me. I have at least 7-8 reloads on some brass. I use a jewelers saw and cut a brass case in half to check it. Somebody else just posted their pictures of doing the same thing and they had 10 firings out of them.

I would anneal cases when the anneal marks wear off which would be about two to three re-loadings. A good way to test a case is to drop it from about waist high onto a solid hard floor (Concrete is best) mouth downward. If the mouth hits the concrete and you pick it up and there is no noticeable damage or only very slight out of roundness to the mouth the brass needs to be annealed. An annealed/soft case mouth will easily deform doing this same test.
Very INTERESTING test technique. The Anneal Drop test! I can see the YouTube vid now! Maybe we could also incorporate the sound into it as well, assuming it's dropped from standardized height onto a concrete floor of some pre-measured hardness GI3

"BING!!!!!"

Soon as I receive my several gauges and such, I'll set off in the Grande Reloading Experiment!
 
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