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Discussion Starter #1
Ok I've got 2x 1911 A1 pistols... My oldest one and piece together model has its slide stop spring/plunger assy about to pop off the frame....

My SAI Mil Spec pisto is starting to get loose and I've only had it for 4 years... FYI: I carry it every day... I've put well over 3k rds through it .... all Federal AE / Win USA / S & B...

So I'm assuming I've done something wrong over the years as I clean the pistols... I never remove the spring plunger parts off the wpns so I'm wondering why they are coming loose and about to fall off?

Is there a trick of the trade / little side note I've missed over the 13 years I've had these 2x 1911's? My SAI Mil Spec is only 4 years old... .but I've had the other one for 13 years.... Both good guns and shoot very well and function without any problems minus this new discovery... they've both started showing this problem just in the past 2 months?

Any thoughts?

Regards, Madog
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hey, thanks.... I'll order that tool.... Should I get a new plunger assy??? Or try and use the old one and see if it holds?

Regards, Madog
 

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On the INSIDE of the frame, I usually slighty bevel the hole to give the stake some area to "flow" into. Apply a dab of nuclear weapons strength 620 loctite to the bearing surfaces and stake. Your old assy should be fine, just super clean it.
Link for adhesive:
http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=171860

If when you remove it, you see that it was NEVER staked, then the manufacturer simply loctite'd it from the git go.
 

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I would use a new plunger assembly and go to an auto parts store and get either Permatex or Locktite "Stud and Bearing Mount" adhesive. Disassemble the entire frame and clean everything with something like acetone to insure that it is clean and dry. Apply the locktite and install letting it set for a few hours. Then stake it. If you want to use a small ball end grinder just slightly on the inside of the frame on the holes to insure you get the stake properly, that won't hurt. Once staked let it sit over night but wipe off any excess locktite first. The next day it should be good to go. I use an old pair of pliers that were modified with a slot for the plunger tube and a sharp pointed allen screw for a staking tool. Just squeeze and you're done. I've had them for 40 years and that's what I used when I was in business building Colts. It's the best tool for the purpose I've seen. I think some military armorer used to sell them at local gun shows here.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey, thank you very much guys.... I ordered the tools to do this... since 1911's are my old sidearms I have minus a Colt .45LC 1876 peacemaker and 1851 Navy... I need to know how to maintain and keep these pistols in top working order...

If any other pointers I'm all ears...

Regards, Madog
 

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1. don't use steel cleaning rods or stainless steel brushes to clean them.

2. Always disassemble slides and clean from chamber end.

3. Lube with drops, not glugs, and I like rem oil, many don't
a. 1 drop on hood
b. 1 drop on inside of bushing
c. 1 drop on slide stop
d. 1 drop on each slide rail and then one on each frame rail
e. 1 drop on hammer face
f. 1 drop on spring guide
g. on reassembly run the slide back and forth a dozen
times and wipe of excess off the back of the slide and
load up and you're good to go.
4. Change your recoil spring about every 2 years unless you
aren't shooting much then you may go longer. For spring
tension, I use the factory spring in my Defender and 18.5lb
Wolffs in Governments and 20lb wolffs in commanders,
assuming all are .45's.

5. Keep a spare recoil spring, slide stop, and extractor
around ready to go just in case. If you feel the need, add
a firing pin stop, firing pin and firing pin spring. Those
are the parts that usually break and disable a pistol and
though the breakage isn't real common, neither is it rare.
If the firing pin spring breaks the pin often gets stuck
forward in the firing pin hole and the pin stop falls off and
gets lost at the range in the dirt. I've seen that happen a
lot during competitions. But competition guns get shot a
lot more than normal use pistols. Slide stop breakage
isn't uncommon either. Extractors should be fitted
properly and tested in the gun and then kept in your
kit.

6. Check your mags periodically at the range for function and
lock back when empty. Mark any questionable ones with
a red felt tip with a dot and use those for practice not carry.
Keep in mind that sometimes a bad load even in a factory
round could cause a mag problem so don't mark any that
you haven't checked with a couple of types of ammo that
is not a reload.

Best I can do on short notice and good luck.
 

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once they are properly staked, they will NEVER come loose! you dont need to use any thread locker or any other substance on them either. this is an all too common occurance, and shouldnt be.
 

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Loose plunger tubes are common. I finally started having mine brazed on. They never come loose.
 

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Brownells at least used to carry plunger tubes with slightly extended 'legs,' to allow a little more meat to hold them in place. They also had one that is held in place with screws. And, I recently saw one (though I don't remember where) that has four 'legs' to hold it in place!

FWIW, I wouldn't recommend restaking one that has come loose; it won't stay tight, and they're quite inexpensive.
 
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