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Discussion Starter #1
Band new M1A scout, not one round through it yet.

To make an embarrassing story short, due to inexperience, I released the bolt (wasn’t stripped either) and it slammed home on a forester field gauge and went into battery.

How screwed am I?
I know what I did wrong but only AFTERWARDS.
I didn’t see any visible damage to the chamber or bolt or the gauge but that’s not to say there isn’t any that I can’t see.

Anyone see this happen before?
Looking for advise before I do anything else
 

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No to worry, it has happened many times. Just be happy it wasn't your go or no/go gauge.

Remember, in the future, to first remove the op spring and bolt guts before you even put your gauges near the chamber.
 

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Pretty sure the spring is not strong enough to permanently deform any steel surface. Besides, into battery is a relative term. The lug faces have helical surfaces on them, so the bolt sort of 'screws' into battery. If anything were blocking it, it simply would not go completely closed.
 

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Besides the obvious question of why the OP was doing this with a new rifle?
My other question for Art is why would it be more of an issue if using the go or no-go gauges?
 

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Besides the obvious question of why the OP was doing this with a new rifle?

I always check headspace on new rifles. While I was still in the military I got a call from a LGS asking if I could check out a new M1A that they sold and when fired caused case separations with commercial ammo. Military ammo showed extreme stretching marks. Since they knew I was Direct and General Support armorer they figured I could find out what the problem was. After running all my headspace gauges on it I found it would close on a field gauge and still show play fully closed. I started adding shims to the bolt face to see how loose it was. Finally I used a piece of a paper match and the bolt was finally snug as it closed. It was that bad. I filled out a DA Form 2404 for the shop to send with the rifle back to the manufacturer. The rifle was return back to the shop in less then three weeks with a new barrel and bolt. That's why I check headspace on new rifles.GI1
 

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Besides the obvious question of why the OP was doing this with a new rifle?
My other question for Art is why would it be more of an issue if using the go or no-go gauges?
Because the calibration of the Go and No/Go are a more necessary and critical measurement to the safety of a chamber when initially setting one up than a field gauge, in my opinion. Calibration of gauges can be altered by mishandling.
 

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It would seem to the less knowledgeable, me: that slamming the longer field gauge in might be more problematic to the chamber.
 

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I’d say you’re pretty lucky it was a gauge and not your fingertip.
Obtain a stripper clip and place it in the guide whenever you are horsing around and have the bolt back. It will stop the bolt if you hit the release accidentally. M1s are especially dangerous in this respect. I always wire tie mine to the rear sight just in case. Lost a whole fingernail in an M1 years ago.
 

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Things like this is why I don't loan my HS gages out , accidents happen , but I would rather do it to my own Gages .
That was my point, with the field gauge being the least critical of the three. Rarely even use a field. If an action closes on a NO/GO, it's time for some work and or parts changes.
 

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so lemme get this straight? The Field gauge went into battery- closed the bolt on it?

Or the bolt just slammed the Field gauge into the chamber without closing? Not sure how much damage if any but I would not make that mistake again.

Just trying to understand what you did. When I check for headspace, I like the bolt bare and I just operate it by hand w/o the op rod. While you can check headspace w/ the rifle fully assembled, just gotta be extra careful the op rod does not get away from you.

I am just curious if the gauge actually pushed the bevel forward.
 

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If the bolt went completely into battery on a field gauge something is wrong
Not necessarily, depending on how close to field rejection it originally was.

If he dropped the bolt from a fully compressed spring, you can compress the gauge and stretch things. The bolt lugs and receiver are helices, so there is a powerful camming action.
 

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"Hey, good thing I borrowed your gauges, I was still able to close the bolt with a little force".... "Oh, FYI the other gauge rolled off the bench, luckily it didn't drop too high"
"I filed and sanded the dent off of it, so it looks good now"

No, I dont loan gages, precision measuring tools, or any tools out any more. I may offer to do the task for them, but I dont loan tools anymore. I too learned the hard way.
 
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