M14 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
looking for a good medical kit. i have pieced mine together over the years. is there a good one pre-packed that anyone knows about???

i was looking a the HEM-kit from chinook....

want to buy my brother one
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,441 Posts
I've had, and also know other people who've had, medic and EMS-type training and like me they all assemble their own kits- mindful of real life accidents, one cheapskate guy who trained me back in the '80s just stocked his car with Kotex and triangular bandages- but that was some years back and now there's better stuff on the market.

Anyway, if you really want a true SHTF pre-packaged kit, from my own experience I can only recommend the really big expensive ones sold at West Marine stores (they are assembled for off shore blue water cruising and have things like skin staplers)- but I'd take my own kits with Steri-strips and butterfly bandages plus something powerful but over-the-counter in the way of painkillers over any 2 of those.

In the DIY department, get ready for major wound trauma and you've already beat most anything commercially available- big battle dressings such as are available thru Amazon.com (the 'Israeli' versions seem to be a good choice) are my version of a security blanket. Training is the main thing, everyone should get it, basic Red Cross at least. Then get a friend who's had it and you'll be safe yourself!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,382 Posts
A basic starting point may be your next gun show. In Ohio, . . . we regularly see the military first aid (shooting first aid) kits from Viet Nam and shortly after days.

They usually go for 8 to 10 bucks, . . . and can be enough, . . . depending on the "shot" it needs to address. A good point is that it comes in a strong nylon pouch and is in a water resistant plastic box.

I'd recommend a couple needles, . . . thread, . . . and pliers to be inside if you are really going boonieville or anticipating SHTF.

I got one about a month ago, . . . will update it with sutchers, needles, pliers, clotting agents.

May God bless,
Dwight
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
870 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
751 Posts
I noticed a local gun store is stocking a display of Quick Clot Trauma Kits with the First Aid and camping supplies. The kits are only about $20, and I picked one up to keep in my range bag. We had need of one at a recent pistol match when a bullet fragmented on a steel target stand and bounced back to hit a spectator in the neck. One of the RSOs is a paramedic, and we keep the trauma kits in the range first aid kit, so he got the bleeding under control very quickly, and the guy was back shooting the next day. It would have been messier without a fast way to stop the bleeding. Remember the Boy Scout Motto, and Be Prepared. GI1
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Kicks,

I bought the HEM-kit from Chinook about a year ago, went to our Local Tractor supply and bought scaples and sutures along with several different types of hemostats, sissors, forcepts, needles and syringes. I then added a good first aid book; I took all this to the local Red Cross and got some training. Althought the kit is not complete and is no substitue for seeking professional medical help when you can, it is a great starting point. In a real disaster the hospitals are going to overloaded with people and the more you can do for your self and your family the better off you are.

To me the most important thing was to get some training. The Red Cross and my local Fire Dept EMT's made good suggestions for additions to the kit. I am in no way prepared to handle major trauma but I feel generally prepared to handle small things for myself and family.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,441 Posts
I noticed a local gun store is stocking a display of Quick Clot Trauma Kits with the First Aid and camping supplies. The kits are only about $20, and I picked one up to keep in my range bag. We had need of one at a recent pistol match when a bullet fragmented on a steel target stand and bounced back to hit a spectator in the neck. One of the RSOs is a paramedic, and we keep the trauma kits in the range first aid kit, so he got the bleeding under control very quickly, and the guy was back shooting the next day. It would have been messier without a fast way to stop the bleeding. Remember the Boy Scout Motto, and Be Prepared. GI1
I really like those Trauma Kits as well, posted about them one other time. The Adventure Medical version I have is waterproof, compact, has several dressing options, and can always be kept handy, like in a coat pocket, and I strongly hope they will be good for dealing with all major tissue injuries.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,222 Posts
Be careful storing meds. Some of that stuff can go bad prior to their expirations when subjected to trunk-like swings in temperature. Though most often I think drugs past their expiration, "fail gracefully," and just become relatively inert.

Taking a cruise of your local CVS or Sav-On or whatever you have locally, you can get generic drugs for dirt cheap. I made the mistake of buying the mega bottles of a few things and they're a waste of money. Even if you use them constantly, you'll never run through them before they expire--unless you're supplying an entire college football team with ibuprofin. So you figure $20 every 2 years for generics gets you a pretty good supply of basic stuff.

Off the top of my head I'd say some simple basics, though some of this stuff isn't first aid:

ibuprofen--fever, pain, anti-swelling
rubbing alcohol--sterolization, and a futile attempt to teach me to spell
hydrogen peroxide--for that bleach blonde look
listerine--as an antiseptic
petroleum jelly--burns, cuts, healing
sun screen--no use getting sunburn
small thing of bug spray--no use getting west nile
hand sanitizer--does some of the job of rubbing alcohol in like 1/100th the portion size
contact lens solution--if you wear them, you'll need to fight protein build-up
pepto-bismal--diarrhea can kill, or at least kill your underwear
multi-vitamin--supplement any rations, but take cautiously
back-up of any medication you take regularly
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,441 Posts
Be careful storing meds. Some of that stuff can go bad prior to their expirations when subjected to trunk-like swings in temperature. Though most often I think drugs past their expiration, "fail gracefully," and just become relatively inert.

Taking a cruise of your local CVS or Sav-On or whatever you have locally, you can get generic drugs for dirt cheap. I made the mistake of buying the mega bottles of a few things and they're a waste of money. Even if you use them constantly, you'll never run through them before they expire--unless you're supplying an entire college football team with ibuprofin. So you figure $20 every 2 years for generics gets you a pretty good supply of basic stuff.

Off the top of my head I'd say some simple basics, though some of this stuff isn't first aid:

ibuprofen--fever, pain, anti-swelling
rubbing alcohol--sterolization, and a futile attempt to teach me to spell
hydrogen peroxide--for that bleach blonde look
listerine--as an antiseptic
petroleum jelly--burns, cuts, healing
sun screen--no use getting sunburn
small thing of bug spray--no use getting west nile
hand sanitizer--does some of the job of rubbing alcohol in like 1/100th the portion size
contact lens solution--if you wear them, you'll need to fight protein build-up
pepto-bismal--diarrhea can kill, or at least kill your underwear
multi-vitamin--supplement any rations, but take cautiously
back-up of any medication you take regularly
I support the above- where I am you want a giant tub of insect repellant so there are regional issues- and I would add Providone, which is basically an iodine solution used to sterilize skin surfaces. You can buy the stuff quite cheaply in bulk, then fill rather small Nalgene bottles for light weight carry. It makes every wound colourful, but on the positive side that means you can tell where it is. The only drug I can think of that's actually dangerous after expiry is codeine, which allegedly becomes poisonous. That is of course not counting things that are dangerous through inertness- I'm thinking of antibiotics and insulin, things like that which look as if they should work but will actually make the situation worse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,441 Posts
I've also been thinking that it's good to carry come tincture of iodine, the kind used to put on cuts that is mostly frowned upon these days. It's still good for small cuts and also can be uses as a backup, or even a basic, water purfiier. For the best weight-to-usefullness ratio, I try to find max strength 5% solution but mostly only 2.5% is available these days. To remove the iodine afterwards, if you don't like the taste, all you have to do is to add come ascorbic acid powder, ie vitamin C in its pure form (scrape or crush some of those cheap white tablets), and it precipitates right out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,961 Posts
I've also been thinking that it's good to carry come tincture of iodine, the kind used to put on cuts that is mostly frowned upon these days. It's still good for small cuts and also can be uses as a backup, or even a basic, water purfiier. For the best weight-to-usefullness ratio, I try to find max strength 5% solution but mostly only 2.5% is available these days. To remove the iodine afterwards, if you don't like the taste, all you have to do is to add come ascorbic acid powder, ie vitamin C in its pure form (scrape or crush some of those cheap white tablets), and it precipitates right out.
Mercurichrome is the one they frowned on....had Mercury in it. I still use Tincture of Iodine.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,222 Posts
I just realized I need better gear. I live in an old apartment that is easily capable of burning down, in an area that is subject to massive earthquakes, in an officially designated tsunami zone. No kidding.

Here's what I have in my car, but it's getting pretty old. I have a few things added, but I don't want it too heavy, as it is extra weight to carry around. But do I have any glaring omissions?


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Funny that I stumbled across this post, The next thing im looking to buy is some "real" first aid kits, not the crap I have now. I have no idea where to start so this helped a bit.

Anyone have any sites or literature that shows how to stop extreme bleeding and using things like quik-clot? Gunshot wounds is what im mostly worried about. The equipment is probably not too useful without some idea on how to use it.

I want to stow one in my truck, but mainly want to put some stuff in my range bag, ive seen some shady stuff at the range/competition, and id like to be prepared for when someone accidentally shoots thier leg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I've used a lot of different first aid kits in the backcountry, both small kits that can be carried in a back pack as well as bigger kits that take up the whole back back. The best ones in my experience were made by Conterra. They ship with good supplies and you can even get als kits. They typically leave out the stuff that's 'too new' in favor of the tried and true supplies found in most professional kits. My favorite thing, however, was that the construction of the packs themselves is very durable and came with a lifetime warranty. Last I checked, you could order most of their pack with or without supplies pre-packed.

As far as what supplies to keep in the kit, my perspective is to just carry whatever you know how to use... and a crap load of things like 4x4 gauze, triangle bandages, and tape. I've also found that the squeezy bottles of sterile saline solution are great for irrigating deep wounds (as opposed to irrigation syringes). I also saw someone mention sunscreen, which I reckon is pretty important for many environments and often forgotten. Another one that often gets left off is Benadryl (sp?). It's important, though, to keep in mind the scope of the kit. A lot of people have things like bp cuff in their kits, which is pretty big and not actually that useful, while lacking something like asprin or electrolyte tablets, which are very small and generally more important.

Thats my two cents, anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,441 Posts
Mercurichrome is the one they frowned on....had Mercury in it. I still use Tincture of Iodine.
I didn't know that about mercurichrome, just thought it didn't work very well. It was the kid's choice in my day, being painless as opposed to iodine.

Iodine used to be the universal backcountry first aid thing but its use is now discouraged as well, because it damages (kills) tissue in bad injuries. My earliest first aid training had the stuff sounding like it was no better than witch doctor medecine, but of course it works very well in some situations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
thank u all!! and didnt know the mericuchrome had mercury in it either!! wow, now that is a flashback of my grandma"s first aid kit... i still remember that brown bottle, with the skull and bones on it!...
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top