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At the range today, I only put 10 rounds through my M1A. Should I go ahead and clean the bore (solvent and oil)? I hear that more damage is caused by overcleaning, but I've also heard that I should clean the bore and regrease after each trip to the range.

How often should i clean the bore?

Many Thanks,

Jerry
 

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If you want to, sure. Realistically I would only say a cleaning is "needed" after about 200 rounds or if you plan to store the rifle for a long time (90+ days?) before shooting it. Then at 500 rounds clean the gas system, and at 1000 rounds field strip and re-lube. Those are my rules of thumb anyway.

With bore snakes though, it's so easy to just run it through a few times there's almost no reason not to after every range sessions...
 

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I would say clean it every time. Re-lube if it is necessary.

One summer, I was going to the range every Friday. I would set up my paper targets at 200 meters and there was a little square of steel that usta be the base of a chicken silhouette. I figure it was about 2 inch x 2.5 inch. I would set it up on the berm or on one of the posts while I was downrange.

The first shot from a cold clean barrel would be at that little piece of steel. I was able to make upwards of 90% hits (one miss, but the second shot hit it)on it until finally one hit bounced it somewhere that I could not find it again. This tells me that this rifle was very predictable and shot to the same point of aim clean or dirty. I very seldom ran more than 50-100 rounds for the day, so it was never VERY dirty.

This gun has a Shilen barrel. Some guns will shoot to the same place when clean. Some will not. This one did. Make sure you don't leave oil or bore cleaner in it or the first round will certainly fly weird.

Of course YMMV.
- Ivan.
 

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Greetings,

Well, FWIW, I do. That way I know that when I take any of my rifles out the next time, it will be clean, lubed and ready to go. I usually do a "quick clean" before I even leave the range; run a few patches down the bore and use a chamber brush. If things get too busy when I get home, at least it's fairly clean. 10 rounds is nothing to worry about if you don't clean it (unless you've used corrosive ammo), but I think it's a good practice to get used to.

Regards, Jim
 

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if nothing else oil the bore with a good oil not hoppes or wd40. remember when fired the oil is burned off. if you live in the dessert no problem most anywhere else oil it.
 

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If you want to, sure. Realistically I would only say a cleaning is "needed" after about 200 rounds or if you plan to store the rifle for a long time (90+ days?) before shooting it. Then at 500 rounds clean the gas system, and at 1000 rounds field strip and re-lube. Those are my rules of thumb anyway.

With bore snakes though, it's so easy to just run it through a few times there's almost no reason not to after every range sessions...

I normally shoot 50-60 rds a range session. I shoot weekly, but sometimes I'll hit it twice in a week. I'll wipe down the exposed surfaces with CLP and run a boresnake down the barrel. Other than that I pretty much follow the above schedule. dozier
 

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I keep my bore wet with Hoppes then dry patch before firing. Never have used any oil in the bore.
 

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This has come up often on the forum and each time it does it encourages me to do more research on the subject and each time my research codifies my thoughts. My personal opinion is to clean it after it's shot. There are many schools of thought on the subject. I have never read anything that would suggest that you would wear out a barrel by cleaning it, however a muzzle guide should be used to avoid damaging the LANs and grooves at the muzzle and you should never stop in the middle and change direction with the bore brush. If you are that concerned, purchase a nylon brush. I have used one but it takes longer to finish cleaning.
The subject often comes up regarding break in as well and may shrug off the manufactureres recommendation to shoot and clean shoot and clean for the first several rounds. What you should be concerned about more so than carbon is the copper fouling that occurs especially during break in. I used hoppe's Ol number 9 most of my life and a few years ago started using a dedicated copper cleaner as well as an odorless gun cleaning solvent. This coincided with my nuptials, I was getting complaints from the wife about the smell. I recently switched back to using Ol number 9 and was pleasantly surprised to find out that when I shoot under a hundred rounds or so, a stand alone copper cleaner was not nessasary. I would run a patch of the copper cleaner through only to discover Ol number 9 already did the job. I doubt I will be switching to anything else again in the future. So my biggest concern isn't so much the carbon fouling as it is the copper fouling. If you let the copper go to long you won't get it out. It seems that CM barrels have more of an affinity for copper than SS barrels. My SS barrels clean up with less effort than my CM barrels. I can't speak for chrome lined barrels but every barrel fouls. In the military we were never aloud to turn in a weapon that had not been thoroughly cleaned. I'm sure there are more than a few guys on this forum that have been at the gate for the arms room while having there rifles inspected only to have it handed back to them for some obscure minuscule piece of carbon or a spec of sand. That's the way I was trained and it's hard to break good habits. There are many articles on the net from well respected professionals in the industry you can reference. Take a look at some of the recommendations some of the leading barrel manufacturers like Lija Krieger Shelin and Douglas have to say on the subject. Granted not all barrels are made the same. Some will argue that the manufacturers make these recommendations to cover there asses, they all can't be wrong. It seems as though this is one of those subjects that appears often and there is never a definitive answer because what it really comes down to is what makes the individual happy. You know how the expression goes, everyone has an opinion. Find what your comfortable with and roll with it. Personally I'm running Krieger barrels and I clean my investments. I find that I see no difference in accuracy or point of impact shooting it clean or dirty hot or cold. Hot or cold is another story and another thread.
 

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for 10 shots a probably would not clean it unless it was going to be put away for a few weeks. i usually fire 30-50 rounds twice a week and i clean the bore as soon as i get it home, i find fresh dirt comes off quicker and its kind of just habit by now
 

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I keep my bore wet with Hoppes then dry patch before firing. Never have used any oil in the bore.
X2

I run a wet patch every time at the least, no matter how few rounds I shoot
on a particular day.

Been doing that for 40+ years, my first rifle is still in pristine condition
even after sitting for a few years with Hoppes No 9 in the barrel,
some time ago.

Some would even go as far as saying Hoppes No 9 makes for a good
cologne...
DI2

Good luck
 

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The 14s....or for that matter...all weapons in the base armory that were used for marksmanship/ribbon qualification...generally had an average of 500 plus rounds a week fed thru them and were field stipped and cleaned, ready for inspection every Monday at 0700. The weapons used for instruction courses such as SSEW (Shipboard Security Engagement Weapons), SSET (Shipboard Security Engagement Tactics), SRT/ASF/etc...this weapons had 1000's of rounds a month fed thru them...and all were stripped down and cleaned...if not by the course students then by base armorers (junior ones at that....I was there once....ugh)...

All of these weapons continued to perform, with outstanding results. Were they the top shelf Match Grades we used for PACFLEET shoots?....no. But they were field stripped almost daily.....and still had students shooting high scores on ribbon/medal shoots.

I only own a standard SAI rifle. All I need.....and sometimes, well, alot of times....I tear it down just for fun....same for my 1911's....therapy knowing its clean, maintained and ready to rock....just listening to the parts come apart or slide together is satisfaction to me......
 

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you said you shot 10rds? that's almost nothing. get you a boresnake. it's great for casual cleaning. my rifle shoots better with a fouled bore, but you have to decide how often you are going to use your gun and how important pin point accuracy is for your usage. it makes me feel good to clean my barrel after every shooting session of about 100rds......but i like to hunt with my rifle, so if i know i am going to be using it for best accuracy results i will try not to clean the barrel during hunting season. although, when a good rain comes in and there is a lot of moisture in the air, i clean my barrel and leave it wet with Hoppes#9. i do like hunting with a fouled bore though....but if im just going to make a shot at 100yds......clean bore/dirty bore.......it dont matter.
 

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With me its like a conditional reflex, like the drooling Pavlow dog. Every time something goes bang I am looking for a cleaning device. The rifle don`t need it after 10 rounds but I feel better.
Wolf
 

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Bore snake the loose stuff out after any firing. Brush and solvent after ~250, full oil lube express after 1k. Your barrel may need some fouling seasoning to shoot the best.
 

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AS you can tell by all the Different posts, There are a never ending list of Suggestions.
Let me put it to you this Way and ask you this.
Why do I take all 30-06,7.62x51, and 5.56x45 ammo on stripper clips then in cardboard's then in Ammo Cans with desiccant ???
Very Simple it makes me Feel Better
Since it is your Rifle and Yours Alone Pick one of the Suggestions or your Idea on Cleaning that will make you Feel Better and Go For It
 
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Another 2 cents

If you see me @ the range, the first thing I do is run a clean patch thru the barrel.
That's because I generally will runn at least 2 wet patches thru for the ride home.
One of those patches gets stuffed in the chamber and I close the bolt on it
(let it soak for a while) the other goes into the muzzle. It's a chrome lined barrel, so it cleans up pretty easy. I find non-chromed barrels needs more attention.
I run a brush thru it about every other other range trip. I ALWAYS leave a lite film of oil in the bore. (some say that's just anal, maybe so, but its my rifle).
As far as performance at the range with this rifle so far is that it is "boringly"
repeatable. On this one I almost exclusively use GI type surplus. (RG when I can get it). Is this the way to do things??? Dunno, but it works for me. Some of my stuff is fairly old, but you would never know it by the performance of the rifle. It makes me feel good. adds confidence, eliminates a possible problem.
That's just my head, some of the stuff being shot around me is pretty scary as far as filth is concerned. Just not the way I was taught, thats all


Bob R
 

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During your shooting season when you're firing fresh, clean ammo every few days pick a round count - e.g., every 250 rounds - for thorough patching and brushing. In the winter months let your climate conditions drive the cleaning frequency. If it gets cold and damp for days or weeks you don't want powder residue in your barrel accumulating moisture even if you're not doing much shooting. JMHO.
 
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