M14 Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the cylinder? Mine seems to have vaccum holding it. It will fall, but it takes it a minute.
Trying to get a few bugs out of the M14
Thanks

Edited to add, gas port is open and does not appear to have blockage.
Rifle will ocasionally short stroke, but I suspected mag spring - all GI mags in test. Won't do it with everyone of them but does it on a fair ammount of them. When it runs it runs like a bat outa hell and then it acts up....

Edited again to add that this all on full auto. Never acts up on semi.
Rifle appears fresh but nothing binding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,929 Posts
Have you cleaned out the gas piston and plug to remove the carbon build-up from shooting? That could certainly cause short stroking & may cause the piston to slide down slower (I think).

Most people clean the carbon out every 300-500 rounds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,167 Posts
Please don't take this as anything but friendly advice from a guy that's had a similar problem. What I'm telling you, my friends here on the Firing Line told me.

In response to your first question - Yes, the gas piston should move freely in the gas cylinder. You should be able to hold your stripped action vertical, with the flash suppressor pointing up, and push the gas piston up with your finger and have it fall back down with little or no resistance.

If it doesn't, then there may be a problem. Here's what I'd do:

1. Make sure turn your rifle upside down when you clean the barrel to prevent solvent, oil, etc. from getting into the gas cylinder via the gas port in the barrel.

2. Clean the gas cylinder thoroghly and make sure there is no residue left in the cylinder (big No-No to have residue left on the inside walls - it will just gum things up.) You won't be able to see this residue - but it's there unless you make absolutely certain it's been cleaned out.

3. Inspect and clean the gas piston (I use Mineral Spirits on the gas cylinder and piston after cleaning to make sure there is no residue left).

4, Don't use any kind of abrasive to clean or shine up the piston. I use "N-72 Fine" Crocus cloth to clean my pistons. You can get it any NAPA auto parts store. Takes a little "elbow grease", but it doesn't remove any metal.

I ruined a piston by using #0000 steel wool to clean off some really stuck on fouling. Don't waste good money or parts making the same mistake I did. 8O 8O 8O

5. If all else fails, check your piston for pitting, etc. Any sign of pitting or damage (especially around the head of the piston), I'd replace it.

Here's the one Bad M1A Piston that was shipped with my SA Loaded after just a few hundred rounds - it was obviously a used part or was shipped damaged. New ones are fairly cheap and you can get them from a bunch of different sources - several of our own member have them for sale.

Hope this helps a little.

db
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the advice.

After thorough cleaning and inspection I'm starting to suspect a few mag springs. These mags I've got, I've had for many years. All of them are USGI mainly BRW marked. The bodies and followers all look great. I've noticed however, that when loading mags known good ones get tight on those last few rounds. Cheap enough to replace about the 10 or so that are in the rifle when it acts up so, I guess that Sarco may still have GI springs or the Wolf spring deal does not look too bad.

With the known good mags it dumps 20 rds in about 2 seconds or less,
so I'm doubting any gas problems really.
Any other thoughts?
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top