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So my brand new Scout Squad comes in a couple days ago and I ran 20 rounds of Indian .308 97 though it. One of them got jammed and had to use a block of wood and a rock to get the dang thing out. Should I be concerned about any possible damage to the rifle from shooting that stuff? Is it corrosive? Learned my lesson either way.
 

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I lost all of my rifles & handguns in a mishap on Rio Grande when the barge hit a sandbar and sank.
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So my brand new Scout Squad comes in a couple days ago and I ran 20 rounds of Indian .308 97 though it. One of them got jammed and had to use a block of wood and a rock to get the dang thing out. Should I be concerned about any possible damage to the rifle from shooting that stuff? Yes, only if you keep firing the cheap dirty military surplus ammunition. Is it corrosive? No. Learned my lesson either way.
With the listing below it's all good for your rifle but, Czech Republic, [O O] is corrosive, Indian, [ OFV ], & Pakistan, [ POF ].

http://m14forum.com/ammunition/23464-mil-surplus-ammunition-manufactures-7-62x51mm.html

Good luck and keep enjoying your rifle on the firing range.

The 10 Golden Rules of Ammunition:

1) You can never have too much ammo on hand. 1k rounds per battle rifle is a good minimum to start with (fubar).
2) Supplies of good surplus run out before you know it, and usually when you're running low on ammo, so buy plenty while its available.
3) When in doubt about how much ammo you should buy, refer to rule #1.
4) Ammo is meant to be shot, so shoot often.
5) Because of rule #4, ammo must be replenished often as well.
6) When replenishing supply of ammo, refer to rules #1 through #3.
7) You must buy at least twice as much ammo as you shoot (fubar).
8: Always store ammo in a cool dry place (TEA). Or the only time you have too much ammo is when your house is on fire (Slick).
9) If you don't have room in your house to store ammo per rule #8, build a bunker or a cellar in your back yard for storing ammo (TEA).
10) Friends don't let friends buy Indian surplus ammo (TEA). Or Never buy surplus ammo from a country where you wouldn't drink the water (midrat).

DI5
 
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Some of the first ammo I fired through my Socom was some Indian ('83 if memory serves,) back before I knew what it was. It all went bang and, more or less, stayed on the paper, but that was the last of it I'll ever fire. I did get some sweet cloth bandoleers out of it, though!
 
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Friends don't let friends, shoot Indian ammunition from the 90s!!
 
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Don't shoot ammo from countries where you wouldn't drink the water.. :)
 
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There is a sticky posted in the ammunition forum WARNING about that particular ammo. Of course I found it after I purchased 800 rounds of OFV 75. I did not shoot any of it until I did more research and was convinced that it was ok. To my surprise it was very accurate, especially after I popped the neck sealant loose and seated the bullets deeper to a uniform depth. Better yet, the brass is boxer primed and some of the most durable I have ever fired in an M1A. It is very heavy, and I have to reduce my powder charges from what I use with LC brass. Keep in mind, my experience is with headstamp OFV 75, which is when the british ran the ammunition plant in India. Some time later 80's or early 90's they passed the torch to the Indians, and the ammunition quality became suspect to dangerous. Do not fire or reload any of that brass! Lots of bad stories out there and not worth the risk. I would not even use the pulled bullets out of the 90's Indian.
 
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