M14 Forum banner

Shot second match today!

1209 7
So I shot in my second ever match today. This time I used iron sights as I seemed to be more consistent with them while practicing. With a course of fire of 50 shots, I scored a 392-1X. Disappointing considering I did a 400-5X the first match. However I feel I shot considerably better today than last month. My shots were grouped tightly and consistently, however just not centered on the bull. This was especially disappointing because it held the same zero setting the entire time I practiced, and today it was just impacting elsewhere. I actually improved my sitting rapid fire string (my worst) and also had no misses, which is a good sign. Strangely my best strings from both matches were standing offhand.

Does anyone have suggestions on how to make sure I have the correct zero going into a match? I shot sighters, and felt they were on target, but that was not the case once the real shooting started.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,846 Posts
Congrats on getting out there, I doubt I could do as well. I can't provide any competition-tested recommendations but I will point out that tight groups are usually an indication that the shooter is doing his job pretty well, while being off from the point of aim is usually a problem with the mechanics of the rifle (sights off, loose parts, something putting pressure where it shouldn't, etc.). That's not an absolute but a good rule of thumb to help start identifying what's going on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
It's learn as you go, so keep notes on your zeros. There are many variables that can effect where the group is. You will find that each position (offhand/sitting/prone) will probly have a different zero. Things like different head position, different sling tension, different body postions will manage recoil differently, etc, the list goes on. There is no easy button. The best advise is to shoot more matches and sponge info off the other guys. Bottom line is you have to find what works for you. It's purdy diverse, everybody has there own play book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,884 Posts
Find an ammo and stick with it.

Make sure your positions give you a comfortable head position. If not, change something. You want to be naturally centered up in the aperture. Very important.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,512 Posts
It appears you do not have target pullers, marking each shot as you fire. Does this mean it was a 100 or 200 yard reduced match? If so, a good spotting scope MAY let you see the bullet holes as you shoot them.

Of course when shooting rapid fire, one normally does not use a scope. But, if conditions are right and you are on the ball, you can glance thru your scope after the first 2 rounds, and correct for the last 8.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,037 Posts
Good shooting. Wish offhand were my best scores....

Pay attention to the fundamentals (sight alignment, trigger control and establish your natural point of aim (NPA) often....every slow fire round, every time you sit or go prone from standing and after each magazine/clip change within that string) and you will improve each time out. Establish sight alignment then close your eyes, take a breath and let it out slowly, relax your muscles, and then open your eyes...where are your sights pointed???? Move your position until the sights are aligned on target when you open your eyes. This is NPA. Find it also during the prep periods. You'll improve, especially early, and then plateau once your eyesight, natural concentration level, and equipment become limitations.

I would take a quick peek during the rapids at my first two shots. Then make adjustments. Your point of impact will change at the different positions. I have matches both at 200 and reduced to 100 yards. I can see 30 cal bullet holes at that range with my Barska 20-60x80mm spotting scope. I am sure the Kowa folks can if they have enough magnification.

Good luck and thanks for the post.
 

·
NSRA
Joined
·
2,485 Posts
Congrads on taking up the sport. Always can use a new shooter. Stupid zeros always shifting on you. Keep it up and follow the above advise, and it will all fall into place soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Don't be afraid to change your sights if conditions warrant. I learned from a Master Class shooter yeats ago that you zero is not a static thing, and it can and will change from week to week and especially from range to range. Your zero at your home range may not be the same at an away match, even though the distance is the same. I keep a log book with the zero info for each range I shoot at.
Your rrifle may have its own individual quirks. I had an M1 years ago that would drift right as it heated up. I learned to put 2 clicks of left windage in when I moved from 200 to 300 yds.
Keep practicing. Learn your rifle's behavior. Welcome to a great sport!
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top