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I have the Leupold FX II Scout IER on my Springfield Scout Squad and am very happy with it. A lot of people here seem like the Burris Scout scope and it comes in fixed and variable magnification models. Hindsight being 20/20 I think I would go with the Burris variable magnification model rather than the Leupold but no complaints about the Leupold.
 

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I have read that Leupold offers a variable eXtended eye relief scope but can't find it on the web site. However, I've had great experiences with Leupold's customer service so give 'em a call.

BTW I really like the simplicity of my FX-II Scout IER scope. Very tolerant of eye position and great field of view.
 

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I have the Leupold FX II Scout IER on my Springfield Scout Squad and am very happy with it. A lot of people here seem like the Burris Scout scope and it comes in fixed and variable magnification models. Hindsight being 20/20 I think I would go with the Burris variable magnification model rather than the Leupold but no complaints about the Leupold.
Same here, Leupold FXII Scout scope on my M1A Scout Squad and I have
a Burris scope on my Mini 14. Personally, I prefer the Leupold. It just seems
to be clearer and any distance I want to shoot. Don't get me wrong, the
Burris is a good scope; I just prefer the Leupold.
Dano
 

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I have a Leu 1.5-4 Scout scope but it was kinda pricey, eye relief is quite generous and clarity is top notch
 

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I'm running the Burris 2.75 LER pistol scope and am very happy with it.
 

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I have used in this order:

Leupold FX II fixed 2.5x
Leatherwood Hi-lux 2.5-7x
Burris 2.75x
Nikon Force 2.5-8x

Of all of them, the Leupold had probably the best clarity. The Leatherwood broke. The Burris was fine, but I wanted more magnification. The Nikon does everything I want it to do, and so far I have no problems with it.
 

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I bought a NCstar with no expectation. It has served well, but I would not trust it in a SHTF situation. I also have Leupold M8, and Burris Gunsite Scout Scope. When Don Burris was still alive the quality was above reproach, but when he died, apparently the boys decided to 'take the money and run' and quality went downhill. Caveat Emptor.
 

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So called "scout scopes" are specialized optics intended to be mounted forward of the receiver. They were originally intended to provide a means of mounting a telescopic sight on top ejecting Winchester lever action rifles. I have used such scopes on my Model 94's since they were first introduced in the 1960's, so I know something about them. Jeff Cooper later promoted the use of such scopes on bolt action carbines that he called "scout rifles." A scout scope is better than no scope at all, so if you hunt with a pre-'64 Winchester Model 94, it is a viable alternative to iron sights.

However, forward scope mounting requires extended eye relief and that results in a much reduced field of view, which slows target acquisition for most shooters. Scout scopes manage to combine the worst of both worlds, low magnification (usually about 2x) and a very small field of view. The argument that a forward mounted scope allows shooting with both eyes open is misleading, since (1) most shooters do not keep the off eye open when looking through a scope and (2) even if you keep both eyes open, the natural tendency is to focus your attention on what you see through the scope. With both eyes open you may theoretically see around the scout scope, but your brain tends to ignore peripheral information, particularly under stress.

If your rifle is drilled and tapped for conventional over the receiver scope mounting, that is the best way to go. Avoid the temptation to experiment with a scout scope unless there is no other alternative. An exception might be when scoping a very hard kicking rifle, where the recoil might drive a conventionally mounted scope back into your eyebrow.
 

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I had a HiLux Leatherwood on my m1a Scout. Never could get comfortable with it. Wanted the forward mount so could load with stripper clips. Switched to a Leopold on a Basset mount. Put the Leathwood on aRuger Gunsite Scout. Love it on the Ruger but not the M1a.
 

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Not to get into an argument here, but I was at both Gunsite Scout Scope conferences, and I have watched Carlos Wiedemann break clay birds at trap with a Scout rifle (mine included). The Scout scope has numerous advantages over conventional scopes: 1. it has a 20 mm exit pupil rather than a conventional scopes 5. 2. there is very little on no 'ghost' or dark rings if misaligned. 3. It allows carry at the balance. 4. It allows use of stripper clips, or normal reloading of the M1. 5. It is as rugged as the mount (I stayed busy repairing/replacing Redfields 3-9x on our M21s). The reason for the low power is simple. It prevents the 'what part of the target am I seeing?' It is for close range use, what the (ruffles and flourishes) NRAcalls 'interpersonal confrontation distance. It is for defensive and survival use, not bullseye. Rantoff. dave
PS. Scout, when used in Scout scope, is a proper noun. We didn't trademark IPSC and look where that got us.
 

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Not to get into an argument here, but I was at both Gunsite Scout Scope conferences, and I have watched Carlos Wiedemann break clay birds at trap with a Scout rifle (mine included). The Scout scope has numerous advantages over conventional scopes: 1. it has a 20 mm exit pupil rather than a conventional scopes 5. 2. there is very little on no 'ghost' or dark rings if misaligned. 3. It allows carry at the balance. 4. It allows use of stripper clips, or normal reloading of the M1. 5. It is as rugged as the mount (I stayed busy repairing/replacing Redfields 3-9x on our M21s). The reason for the low power is simple. It prevents the 'what part of the target am I seeing?' It is for close range use, what the (ruffles and flourishes) NRAcalls 'interpersonal confrontation distance. It is for defensive and survival use, not bullseye. Rantoff. dave
PS. Scout, when used in Scout scope, is a proper noun. We didn't trademark IPSC and look where that got us.


i would have to agree with this statement. scout scopes are better suited to, to use an over-used phrase, tactical shooting scenarios at closer ranges, 0 to 300 yds., than conventional scope mounting on the m14 in particular.

this is vs a hunting/bench/sniper mission of a conventionally mounted m14 scope that does preclude use of the stripper clip guide and immediate access to the chamber area.
 

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Just FYI forward mounted scopes were used on Mauser 98s in the later part of WWI if I remember correctly. That would be long before the use of them became popular on the winchester of the 60s. The Mausers were set up that way to allow the use of stripper clips with the optic mounted. The original iron sights were also forward mounted.
 

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I like the Burris in 1.5x. I hunt heavy timber, mostly moving deer at close range. With no magnification I can just swing onto the deer with both eye's open. A Red dot with no power would work for me too.

I tried one in 2.75 and sent it back because the field of view was to tight.
 

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Here is my father's scout rifle a Rem 600 with Redfield Scout scope and mount. The scope is a fixed 2x with horizontal crosshair and heavy post. The rifle is very fast to sight and shoot with both eyes open. The rifle is from the late 1960's. I always carry this rifle still hunting the hardwoods.
 
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