M14 Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What purpose does sanding after applying oil serve? I'm finishing a walnut M14 stock from Fred's with teak oil after stripping and coloring with transtint dyes. I'm on my third coat of oil and have wet sanded with 800 after applying each coat. All it seems to be doing is removing the color slightly, each time I sand it with no real change in surface finish. Does the wet sanding change the appearance somehow?

Thanks,
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,257 Posts
I'm not a stock finisher but I am a carpenter and have experience with walnut and other wood finishing. When you apply a wet coating like BLO or sealer or something like that the fibers in the wood at the surface stand up like tiny hairs, this is what you are sanding down, stock will get smoother and smoother and can be glossier. I personally like just a few coats of BLO and no sanding, makes for a flat or dull look, just my personal opinion, which I know you didnt ask for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,896 Posts
Wet sanding is used to seal the grain, as is done on hunting rifles to create a beautiful, durable finish. It creates a slurry, that is force into the open grain as it is wiped off in the direction of the grain.

It does not work well on stained wood, unless the stain is well absorbed into the wood and the first coat or two of oil goes unsanded.

Military stocks were issued with the grain left open, as it allowed for a better grip. The downside is that the grain eventually fills with dirt, lubricants, etc.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,396 Posts
The purpose is to apply the teak oil as the median and when you wet sand it creates a slurry (part wood, part teak oil) and as you lightly sand and let that slurry dry on the stock it begins to fill the wood grain. It fills the grain as it drys - and in the end when your done buffing and waxing you get a deep reflective, filled look.

I start by using the sand paper grit that you last used when you sanded the stock i.e. Right before re-staining normally 220 or 320. Then step up (wet sanding the teak oil) to 400, 600, 800, 1000 and 1500. From 800 up I apply light coat using the paper to smooth - not much slurry from 800 up and after smoothing with 800 up I wipe any excess off.

If you started at 800 you likely did not get much slurry as that is a very fine grit so it may not accomplish the objective - you do need to let it dry when you wet sand.

Here is a pic a close up of the rear section of the stocks from the batch I just completed and a full length look too! It is a long process but it does work!

Hope this helps explain!

Rear section of stocks


Full length view
 

·
Very Old Salt
Joined
·
1,904 Posts
+1 to what M1Army said. I do it to get the desired color I want as well as fill the pores. This is especially true with walnut from what I have encountered as it's a less dense wood. Your problem may also be attributed to the kind of teak oil you may be using
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,522 Posts
USMC-1While the stocks I am seeing are done BEAUTIFULLY I still like the feel and look of an unsanded stock. Might have to do with not having the patience
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,950 Posts
You could spray a sealer on it, sand that smooth and then lacquer it too. Personally I just tung oil them, I'm not above painting a wood stock either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,906 Posts
first 1 or 2 passes of oing and sanding is to whisker it, and fill pores. to keep sanding after that IMO is a pure waste of time. after that, just keep rubbing oil in, in very very thin coats until you get it where you like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Ok, that makes sense. Thanks for the replies. Before I started finishing I sanded lightly with 400, 600, and then 800. Then I applied a heavy coat of oil and alowed it to dry. Then I oiled and sanded with 800 3 times. It looks pretty good, I suppose I can apply another few coats of transtint and then more oil and see how it goes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,243 Posts
Ok, that makes sense. Thanks for the replies. Before I started finishing I sanded lightly with 400, 600, and then 800. Then I applied a heavy coat of oil and alowed it to dry. Then I oiled and sanded with 800 3 times. It looks pretty good, I suppose I can apply another few coats of transtint and then more oil and see how it goes.
Think of it this way, you are using the very fine wet/dry sandpaper to apply the oil finish.
If you used BLO or Tung oil you can add a alcohol dye over it if you want but if you used Teak Oil Finish or Tung Oil Finish may not penatrate as is has varnishes in it
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top