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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know about the Browning "salt wood" issue, and some of their rifles rusting from wood salt cured. Stocks made mainly in the mid-sixties.

I read recently this was a problem for other manafacturers, including TRW for M14's.

Has anyone heard of this and how does one avoid the "salt stock", if it exists?
 

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I've never heard of this issue for anything other than Browning rifles and shotguns of a certain period. You can't avoid it at all. Either your rifle or shotgun has it or doesn't. If it does, there's nothing you can do but replace the wood, from what I understand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I've never heard of this issue for anything other than Browning rifles and shotguns of a certain period. You can't avoid it at all. Either your rifle or shotgun has it or doesn't. If it does, there's nothing you can do but replace the wood, from what I understand.

I also read that using silver nitrate on an unexposed section of the stock can tell if it has salt. If it bubbles, or turns white...it has salt.

Further reading on this tells me that california claro walnut was tried to be sold to TRW, but failed the physical test., so it was not used as M14 stock material. Fajen, Bishop and another bought and sold it a semi-inlet.
 

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Guys on the Ruger forums talk about salt wood on old Number 1's from (I believe) the early 70's... I've never seen an example though.
 

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One of my shooting buddies has a Browning .22LR that has a saltwood stock. It's pretty grim, very rusted an pitted under the wood. We tried varathaning the stock interior and it didn't work for beans. Finally he just gave up. Really a shame as the rifle is very nice until you take it out of the stock.
 

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"Salt" wood was still showing up hit-or-miss on High $ Browning Superposed O/U shotguns into the early 1970's. They'd make it good, even if it took replacing the whole gun, but the whole episode was a blow to reputation. Many times today, if you're looking at a Browning from the 60's or 70's, the wood has been replaced and you need to inspect thoroughly for rust. Many have been re-blued, too. Caveat emptor.
 

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My Belgium built Browning BAR .338 Win Mag is an early model and doesn't have the salt wood issue. If there is a problem it would be real evident real quick. Browning is the only manufacturer I'm aware of that had the issue. My gunsmith inspected the rifle just this year and found no sign of corrosion. He also was saying that Browning was the only folks that had the problem.
 
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