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Discussion Starter #1
Springfield Armory is discouraging me from removing the action from the stock on my new NM to preserved the glass bedding contact, yet the directions say to clean off the factory grease and oil and re-lube. How do I lube the bolt, bolt roller and other metal to metal surfaces without field stripping the rifle?
Thanks John
 

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When I have to take a glass-bedded rifle apart I turn it over and pull the trigger group, then lightly tap loose the barreled action from the stock with a block of 1x4" lumber. Grease the barreled action, particularly the op rod spring and op rod where it rides in it's guide and at the connector with the receiver. A little grease on the bottom of the bolt and the bolt raceway in the receiver rear. Wipe the stock's and receiver's bedding surfaces clean with acetone on a rag. Put the stock back onto the barreled action the same way it came off. Dab a little grease on the pins, hammer spring, locking lugs, and magazine catch in the trigger group. Put it back in. You can grease all the topside receiver lugs, rails, and bolt roller without taking the rifle apart. You won't ruin the bedding if you're careful and you don't take the rifle apart all the time.
 

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Short answer is you can't do it with a bolt roller tool unless you remove the action and then the bolt from the receiver. I followed there instructions as well with my sm. I had regrets doing so. You will discover that the gas and carbon that escapes from the gas cylinder, if left on the barrel will cause the barrel to start pitting in short order. I had to send my action back for a soft bolt. When it was there they changed the barrel at my request because if the pitting and thankfully they did. So from hear on out I will be removing my bedded actions from the stocks to clean the carbon. The bedding will not get screwed up and the rifle will settle back into the stock after a few rounds. The bedding compound is pretty sturdy stuff. It may be a little stiff coming out.
 

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I have to add that I won't be removing the action after each range session but I will be probably at 300 round intervals. What I do to lube the roller is use a small brush. It's one of those cheapo paint type brushes I think it's an acid brush. It has a metal handle and about 3/8 of and inch of bristles. I just open the action a bit and smear the grease in there with the brush. Aside from that I clean the chamber and bore and the bolt face. That's about it.
 

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Don't be afraid to...

use wooden-shafted Q-tips (strong, don't fall apart). Clean the raceways. You can also use them to clean the bottom of the bbl where the op rod may contact the bbl. You can also grease the op rod shaft, raceways and bolt lug areas as well. From the left side of the receiver, looking across at the bolt roller, pull the op rod back a bit and grease the roller and the internal surfaces of the op rod. You can drop the trigger group occasionally and make sure the bottom of the bolt is cleaned and lubed from time to time. Remember, the more grease you use, the more products of combustion and small brass particles and dust and dirt you pick up and leave in the receiver when you shoot. A lot of ranges don't have perfect grass but have sand, loose soil and blowing dust.

I have never seen pitting on a bbl from gas and carbon (on the outside). But I haven't seen everything, that's for sure. I've had 2 NM rifles with thousands of rounds down range and rarely disassembled. One was a CMP (DCM) issued M14, the other my M1A. Gas cylinder maintenance (about every 3-500 rounds, reaming the plug and piston), cleaning the bore (from the breech using a bore guide) when you think you need to, using the chamber brush wrapped with a cleaning patch with some bore cleaner on it, and other normal maintenance are all you need. You should be able to go much more than 300 rounds before you need to take the action out of the stock.

None of this is foolproof, but you get into a routine. Use a shooting log so you know what you did when, what you modified, what sight changes are necessary for bright light, clouds, wind, different ranges as well.

Bruce
 

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Since it's new, pull it apart carefully and clean and lube well. after that a detail strip and clean isn't necessary after each shoot, just check the chamber and bore, make sure your lube is in place(you can touch it up without dissassembly) and see that the piston is free. I usually detail my rifles at the close of shooting season(early November in the Indiana icebox winter) to get them ready for next year. Depending on how much you shoot a complete detail strip/clean/lube may not be necessary even then. You'll discover pretty quickly what you're comfortable with.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks to everyone who replied. Sounds like good advise.
I appreciate your help.

John
 

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When you take it apart, remove the trigger group and use a wooden dowel to gently tap the action out while manipulating the stock and barrel. Easy does it. Clean and lube to spec.

Prior to re assembling, spray the bedding surfaces with food grade PTFE (Teflon) dry lube such as Super Lube Dry. (food eqipment grade will not break down anything, let alone wood or epoxy) Your action will pop in and out with minimal effort and little if any degradation to the bedding. Give her a spray every time you break it down.
 

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I've got one that's bedded, also. A few years back I adopted some advice from one of Glen Zediker's books - roughly 800 rounds is where I pull out the action to clean what I can't get to otherwise.
 

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As far as the lube goes, there is a bunch of good stuff. SAI ships with a clear PTFE base grease by Super Lube from the factory. I use this on all my weapons. It's clear properties let me see what is in the stuff I'm cleaning off, and it's lubrication characteristics are outstanding. The only other oil I use on guns (sparingly) is Mobil 5-30 synthetic motor oil. UZIs love it, as does the 1911/HiPower family.
 

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As a newbie to M1A/M14 culture this type of thread is fantastic! I appreciate the time and effort you guys put in to your responses.
 

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While SAI's recommendation of not pulling apart a bedded rifle is sound; this does not include a complete take down when receiving a new rifle. This is a good chance to learn how your rifle operates. Check smoothness of operation, look for any defects, etc. I'll clean the bore/chamber and remove any factory dirt/grease left from manufacturing. Coat the rifle exterior liberally with like Eezox or another rust preventative. I'll let it sit overnite so the steel pores can soak up as much of the oil as possible. Wipe off the excess oil the next day. Liberally grease up the receiver rails/bolt/op rod spring/bolt roller/and any moving sliding parts where metal contacts metal. Reassemble. After the rifle is broken in (4-500rds), I would do a basic field stripping and check for any signs of abnormal wear on parts. Clean and re-fresh your grease and re-assemble. If you are satisfied that there is no abnormal wear after the break-in period, you can limit pulling the stock/action apart. dozier
 

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New guy question: what kind of grease are you guys using? This is the first rifle I've had that used anything put oil. Please advise.
 

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Grease...

Here's what I've used for 37 years. Plastilube



It's difficult to find in a can, but you can find it in the little yellow screw cap grease pots. Scott Duff http://www.scott-duff.com/ShooterAcc.htm sells 2 oz for $9.00. Here's a comical link to an eBay auction where a case of the grease pots (100) is listed at...get this...$325.00. http://cgi.ebay.com/M1-GARAND-M1-CARBINE-US-GI-CASE-GREASE-POT-WWII-/310282786874?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item483e4b983a But the good news is that it's the "Buy it Now" price. He'd make more if he sold it in smaller lots. Of course shipping is extra, but you get the idea what the pots look like. If you look in the PX or BX you may find some, there's 10 available on eBay right now for $10 (buy it now)...search under M1 or M14 grease. This one's a good deal.

Some people use Lubriplate, common with Garand shooters, some use Tetra-lube (I think that's what it's called) and there are others.

The key is a grease that has staying power. I've heard of people using bearing grease and other generic lubes. Don't over grease but don't run it dry unless you are in the far north of Alaska or Canada.

HTH

Bruce
 

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As far as the lube goes, there is a bunch of good stuff. SAI ships with a clear PTFE base grease by Super Lube from the factory. I use this on all my weapons. It's clear properties let me see what is in the stuff I'm cleaning off, and it's lubrication characteristics are outstanding. The only other oil I use on guns (sparingly) is Mobil 5-30 synthetic motor oil. UZIs love it, as does the 1911/HiPower family.
This stuff? I love it and it's what I've been using on mine. Believe it or not China-mart (aka Harbor Freight) handles it in a handy 3oz tube. (Super Lube is made in the USA though)

 

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Super Lube

+1 on Super Lube, been using it for years, on the M1A and my semi auto pistols (great for slide rails on 1911s)
 

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I just picked up some of the Super Lube last week from Harbor Freight but have not used it yet, looks like it will work well and the cost is pretty good
 
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